The Arsenal of Democracy

The Arsenal of Democracy

Chronicles Detroit's dramatic transition from an automobile manufacturing center to a highly efficient producer of World War II airplanes, citing the essential role of Edsel Ford's rebellion against his father, Henry Ford. 35,000 first ...

Author: Albert J. Baime

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547719283

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 364

View: 919

Chronicles Detroit's dramatic transition from an automobile manufacturing center to a highly efficient producer of World War II airplanes, citing the essential role of Edsel Ford's rebellion against his father, Henry Ford. 35,000 first printing.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Accidental President

The Accidental President

Tightly focused, meticulously researched and drawing on documentation not available to previous biographers, The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during this tumultuous, history-making four months - ...

Author: A J Baime

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473527157

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 233

Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who find themselves facing extraordinary circumstances and, through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history. Chosen as President Roosevelt's fourth term Vice President for his admired work ethic, good judgement and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man from small-town America. That is, until he was thrust in over his head following the sudden death of Roosevelt. With the world still caught up in the inferno of the Second World War, Truman found himself playing the roles of both judge and jury during the founding of the UN, the Potsdam Conference, the Manhattan Project, the German surrender, the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps and the decision to drop the Bomb and bring the war to the end. Tightly focused, meticulously researched and drawing on documentation not available to previous biographers, The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during this tumultuous, history-making four months - when the stakes were high and the challenges even higher . . .
Categories: History

The Automobile and American Life 2d ed

The Automobile and American Life  2d ed

Recent monographs on the topic include A.J. Baime, The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War (New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014); Charles K. Hyde, Arsenal of Democracy: The American ...

Author: John Heitmann

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476669359

Category: Transportation

Page: 291

View: 566

Reviews of the first edition: "The prose is almost flawless, and the writing never feels beleaguered...it is almost like the author enjoyed every topic and every page. Highly recommended. All collections"—Choice "A great starting point for any student of American automotive history and a worthwhile addition to a collector's bookshelf"—Autoweek "Fun, informative, and close to a prewar bull's eye!"—Prewar Auto Notes "Very worthwhile reading"—Hemmings Classic Car "This is an immensely useful work, especially for those of us who want an entertaining and provocative text for our courses...provide teachers with a great opportunity to expand on the text in class...a valuable asset to any teacher who hopes to bring the automobile and automobility into the classroom"—Technology and Culture "Highly recommended"—Enterprise & Society "A deeply thought provoking study"—www.route66infocenter.com. Now revised and updated, this book tells the story of how the automobile transformed American life and how automotive design and technology have changed over time. It details cars' inception as a mechanical curiosity and later a plaything for the wealthy; racing and the promotion of the industry; Henry Ford and the advent of mass production; market competition during the 1920s; the development of roads and accompanying highway culture; the effects of the Great Depression and World War II; the automotive Golden Age of the 1950s; oil crises and the turbulent 1970s; the decline and then resurgence of the Big Three; and how American car culture has been represented in film, music and literature. Updated notes and a select bibliography serve as valuable resources to those interested in automotive history.
Categories: Transportation

Nature at War

Nature at War

1 A. J. Baime, The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014), 210. 2 Ernie Pyle, Brave Men (New York: H. Holt and Co., 1944), 8. 3 James Dunn, “Engineers in ...

Author: Thomas Robertson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108419765

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 511

"World War II was the largest and most destructive conflict in human history. It was an existential struggle that pitted irreconcilable political systems and ideologies against one another across the globe in a decade of violence unlike any other. There is little doubt today that the United States had to engage in the fighting, especially after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The conflict was, in the words of historians Allan Millett and Williamson Murray, "a war to be won." As the world's largest industrial power, the United States put forth a supreme effort to produce the weapons, munitions, and military formations essential to achieving victory. When the war finally ended, the finale signaled by atomic mushroom clouds over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, upwards of 60 million people had perished in the inferno. Of course, the human toll represented only part of the devastation; global environments also suffered greatly. The growth and devastation of the Second World War significantly changed American landscapes as well. The war created or significantly expanded a number of industries, put land to new uses, spurred urbanization, and left a legacy of pollution that would in time create a new term: Superfund site"--
Categories: History

The War on History

The War on History

A. J. Baime, The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War (Boston: Mariner Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015), 285. Julie Zauzmer, “Holocaust Study: Two-Thirds of Millennials Don't Know What ...

Author: Jarrett Stepman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781621579076

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 426

The War on Our History Confederate memorials toppled . . . Columbus statues attacked with red paint. They started with slave-owning Confederate generals, but they’re not stopping there. The vandals are only pretending to care about the character of particular American heroes. In reality, they hate what those heroes represent: the truths asserted in the Declaration of Independence and embodied in the Constitution. And they are bent on taking America down and replacing our free society with a socialist utopia. All that stands in their way is Americans’ reverence for our history of freedom. Which is why that history simply has to go. Now, Jarrett Stepman, editor at The Daily Signal and host of Right Side of History, exposes the true aims of the war on our history: The war on America: World history is full of conquests and suffering indigenous peoples. Why target Christopher Columbus? What they really want to tear down is America. The war on Thanksgiving: World history is full of colonists. Why target the Pilgrims? What they really want to tear down is American freedom and prosperity. The war on the Founding: World history is full of slavery. Why target Thomas Jefferson? What they really want to tear down are the rights endowed by our Creator. The war on the common man: World history is full of victorious generals and populist politicians. Why target Andrew Jackson? What they really want to tear down is democracy. The war on the South: World history is full of civil strife. Why target Confederate heroes like Robert E. Lee? What they really want to tear down is respect for America’s past and the reconciliation that renewed our Union. The war on patriotism: World history is full of national pride. Why target Teddy Roosevelt? What they really want to tear down is the idea of American greatness. The war on the American century: World history is full of bloody wars. What they really want to tear down is America’s defeat of totalitarianism. If America is to survive this assault, we must rally to the defense of our illustrious history. The War on History is the battle plan.
Categories: Political Science

White Freedom

White Freedom

A. J. Baime, The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War (New York: Mariner Books, 2015); Herman, Freedom's Forge; Nelson Lichtenstein, Labor's War at Home: The CIO in World War II (Philadelphia: ...

Author: Tyler Stovall

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691205373

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 896

The racist legacy behind the Western idea of freedom The era of the Enlightenment, which gave rise to our modern conceptions of freedom and democracy, was also the height of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. America, a nation founded on the principle of liberty, is also a nation built on African slavery, Native American genocide, and systematic racial discrimination. White Freedom traces the complex relationship between freedom and race from the eighteenth century to today, revealing how being free has meant being white. Tyler Stovall explores the intertwined histories of racism and freedom in France and the United States, the two leading nations that have claimed liberty as the heart of their national identities. He explores how French and American thinkers defined freedom in racial terms and conceived of liberty as an aspect and privilege of whiteness. He discusses how the Statue of Liberty—a gift from France to the United States and perhaps the most famous symbol of freedom on Earth—promised both freedom and whiteness to European immigrants. Taking readers from the Age of Revolution to today, Stovall challenges the notion that racism is somehow a paradox or contradiction within the democratic tradition, demonstrating how white identity is intrinsic to Western ideas about liberty. Throughout the history of modern Western liberal democracy, freedom has long been white freedom. A major work of scholarship that is certain to draw a wide readership and transform contemporary debates, White Freedom provides vital new perspectives on the inherent racism behind our most cherished beliefs about freedom, liberty, and human rights.
Categories: History

The West and the Global Power Shift

The West and the Global Power Shift

The phrase 'Arsenal of Democracy' did not originate with FDR; it had been used sporadically over the preceding two decades by playwrights and ... The arsenal of democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an epic quest to arm an America at war.

Author: Riccardo Alcaro

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137574862

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 937

This book assesses the state of transatlantic relations in an era of emerging powers and growing interconnectedness, and discusses the limits and potential of transatlantic leadership in creating effective governance structures. The authors first resort to theory and history to understand the transatlantic relationship. They then consider the domestic and systemic factors that might set the relationship between the United States and Europe on a different path. Finally, the authors locate the potential for transatlantic leadership in the context of the global power shift. The world of the 21st century displays different power configurations in different policy domains. This changing structure of power complicates the exercise of leadership. Leadership requires not only greater power and authority, but also persuasion, bargaining and moral suasion, all necessary strategies to build coalitions and manage conflicts between great powers.
Categories: Political Science

Detroit in World War II

Detroit in World War II

Baime, A.J. The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm America at War. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014. Bjorn, Lars. Before Motown: A History of Jazz in Detroit, 1920–60. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan ...

Author: Gregory D. Sumner

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625857002

Category: History

Page: 161

View: 796

A history of everyday life in the Motor City during the Second World War and the contributions its citizens made to the war effort. When President Roosevelt called for the country to be the great “Arsenal of Democracy,” Detroit helped turn the tide against fascism with its industrial might. Locals were committed to the cause, putting careers and personal ambitions on hold. Factories were retooled from the ground up. Industrialist Henry Ford, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, aviator Charles Lindbergh, legendary boxer Joe Louis, future baseball Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg and the real-life Rosie the Riveters all helped drive the city that was “forging thunderbolts” for the front lines. With a panoramic narrative, author Gregory D. Sumner chronicles the wartime sacrifices, contributions and everyday life of the Motor City.
Categories: History

The Year of Peril

The Year of Peril

A. J. Baime, The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014), 94–95, 286; Doris Kearns Goodwin, No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt; ...

Author: Tracy Campbell

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300233780

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 765

This fascinating chronicle of how the character of American society revealed itself under the duress of World War II "place(s) today's myriad social traumas and dislocations in perspective." -- George Will, Washington Post The Second World War exists in the American historical imagination as a time of unity and optimism. In 1942, however, after a series of defeats in the Pacific and the struggle to establish a beachhead on the European front, America seemed to be on the brink of defeat and was beginning to splinter from within. Exploring this precarious moment, Tracy Campbell paints a portrait of the deep social, economic, and political fault lines that pitted factions of citizens against each other in the post-Pearl Harbor era, even as the nation mobilized, government-aided industrial infrastructure blossomed, and parents sent their sons off to war. This captivating look at how American society responded to the greatest stress experienced since the Civil War reveals the various ways, both good and bad, that the trauma of 1942 forced Americans to redefine their relationship with democracy in ways that continue to affect us today.
Categories: History

Whose Detroit

Whose Detroit

A. J. Baime, The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War (Boston, Mass., 2014); this book, 55. 2. Robert Caro, Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson III (New York, 2009), 955. 3.

Author: Heather Ann Thompson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501709227

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 299

In Whose Detroit?, Heather Ann Thompson focuses in detail on the African American struggles for full equality and equal justice under the law that shaped the Motor City during the 1960s and 1970s. Even after Great Society liberals committed themselves to improving conditions in Detroit, Thompson argues, poverty and police brutality continued to plague both neighborhoods and workplaces. Frustration with entrenched discrimination and the lack of meaningful remedies not only led black residents to erupt in the infamous urban uprising of 1967, but it also sparked myriad grassroots challenges to postwar liberalism in the wake of that rebellion. With deft attention to the historical background and to the dramatic struggles of Detroit's residents, and with a new prologue that argues for the ways in which the War on Crime and mass incarceration also devastated the Motor City over time, Thompson has written a biography of an entire nation at a time of crisis.
Categories: Social Science