The Birth of a Texas Ghost Town

The Birth of a Texas Ghost Town

The birth of a Texas ghost town: Thurber, 1886–1933 / by Mary Jane Gentry; edited and with an introduction by T. Lindsay Baker; foreword by Larry Gatlin. — 1st ed. p. cm. — (Tarleton State University southwestern studies in the ...

Author: Mary Jane Gentry

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585446292

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 198

In its heyday, Thurber was home to coal miners and brick plant workers from Italy, Poland, and as many as fourteen other European nations, not to mention the many Mexican immigrants who came to the area. In this, her master’s thesis, Mary Jane Gentry, who started the first grade in Thurber and graduated as valedictorian of its high school in 1930, records first-hand memories of the town’s vibrant charm. Now edited and with an introduction by T. Lindsay Baker, Gentry’s lively history of the rise and decline of a Texas coal town provides a unique window into a bygone era. Her narrative of rancorous labor disputes, corporate machinations, and the eventual shuttering of the plants and virtual disappearance of the once-thriving town will allow Thurber to live again, if only in the minds of her readers.
Categories: History

Birth of a Texas Ghost Town

Birth of a Texas Ghost Town

Edited and with an introduction by T. Lindsay Baker; foreword by Larry Gatlin.

Author: Mary Jane Gentry

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781603443975

Category: Brick trade

Page: 205

View: 535

Edited and with an introduction by T. Lindsay Baker; foreword by Larry Gatlin.
Categories: Brick trade

Historic Texas from the Air

Historic Texas from the Air

“Black Diamonds & Vanishing Ruins: Reconstructing the Historic Landscape of Thurber, Texas.” Mining History Journal (1995): 51–62. Mary Jane Gentry. The Birth of a Texas Ghost Town: Thurber, 1886–1933. College Station: Texas A&M ...

Author: David Buisseret

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292719279

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 687

The extremely varied geography of Texas, ranging from lush piney woods to arid, mountainous deserts, has played a major role in the settlement and development of the state. To gain full perspective on the influence of the land on the people of Texas, you really have to take to the air—and the authors of Historic Texas from the Air have done just that. In this beautiful book, dramatic aerial photography provides a complete panorama of seventy-three historic sites from around the state, showing them in extensive geographic context and revealing details unavailable to a ground-based observer. Each site in Historic Texas from the Air appears in a full-page color photograph, accompanied by a concise description of the site's history and importance. Contemporary and historical photographs, vintage postcard images, and maps offer further visual information about the sites. The book opens with images of significant natural landforms, such as the Chisos Mountains and the Big Thicket, then shows the development of Texas history through Indian spiritual sites (including Caddo Mounds and Enchanted Rock), relics from the French and Spanish occupation (such as the wreck of the Belle and the Alamo), Anglo forts and methods of communication (including Fort Davis and Salado's Stagecoach Inn), nineteenth-century settlements and industries (such as Granbury's courthouse square and Kreische Brewery in La Grange), and significant twentieth-century locales, (including Spindletop, the LBJ Ranch, and the Dallas–Fort Worth International Airport). For anyone seeking a visual, vital overview of Texas history, Historic Texas from the Air is the perfect place to begin.
Categories: History

Portrait of Route 66

Portrait of Route 66

... Texas (1975) The First Polish Americans: Silesian Settlements in Texas (1979) Historia najstarszych polskich osad w ... Birth of a Texas Ghost Town: Thurber, 1886– 1933, by Mary Jane Gentry (2008) Gangster Tour of Texas (2011) Texas ...

Author: T. Lindsay Baker

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806156163

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 280

View: 958

By the time Route 66 received its official numerical designation in 1926, picture postcards had become popular travel souvenirs. At the time, these postcards with colorful images served as advertisements for roadside businesses. While cherished by collectors, these postcard depictions do not always reflect reality. They often present instead a view enhanced for promotional purposes. Portrait of Route 66 lets us see for the first time the actual photographs from which the postcards were made, and in describing how the production process worked, introduces us to an extraordinary archival collection, adding new history to this iconic road. The Curt Teich Postcard Archives, held at the Lake County Discovery Museum in Wauconda, Illinois, contains one of the nation’s largest collections of Route 66 images, including thousands of job files for postcards produced by Curt Teich and Company of Chicago. T. Lindsay Baker combed these files to choose the best examples of postcards and their accompanying photographs not only to reflect well-known sites along the route but also to demonstrate the relationships between photographs and their resulting postcards. The photographs show the reality of the locations that customers sometimes wanted "improved" for aesthetic purposes in creating the postcards. Such alterations included removing utility poles or automobile traffic and rendering overcast skies partly cloudy. This book will interest historians of art and design as well as the worldwide audiences of Route 66 aficionados and postcard collectors. For its mining of an invaluable and little-known photographic archive and depiction of high-quality photographs that have not been seen before, Portrait of Route 66 will be irresistible to all who are interested in American history and culture.
Categories: Antiques & Collectibles

Texas Labor History

Texas Labor History

Master's thesis, University of Texas at Austin, 1997. Ferrell, Jeff. ... “East Texas/Western Louisiana Sawmill Towns and the Control of Everyday Life.” Locus 3, No. ... The Birth of a Texas Ghost Town: Thurber, 1886–1933.

Author: Bruce A. Glasrud

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781603449458

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 786

A helpful new source for scholars and teachers who wish to fill in some of the missing pieces. Tackling a number of such presumptions—that a viable labor movement never existed in the Lone Star State; that black, brown, and white laborers, both male and female, were unable to achieve even short-term solidarity; that labor unions in Texas were ineffective because of laborers’ inability to confront employers—the editors and contributors to this volume lay the foundation for establishing the importance of labor to a fuller understanding of Texas history.
Categories: History

Thurber

Thurber

Gordon, TX: Thurber Historical Association, 1999. Ely, Glen Sample, and Ruby Schmidt and the Thurber Historical Association. Boomtown to Ghost Town: Thurber, Texas 1886–1936. DVD video. 1991. Gentry, Mary Jane. The Birth of a Texas ...

Author: Deborah M. Liles

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467105569

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 296

Once a busy industrial town of nearly 10,000, Thurber now boasts a residency of less than 10. For approximately 50 years, from 1886 to 1936, migrants from the United States, Mexico, Russia, Britain, and Eastern and Western Europe mined bituminous coal, manufactured bricks, and provided the labor for all of the residual businesses in an entirely company-owned town. The rich history of Thurber includes big-city investors, Texas Rangers, labor unions, railroads, sports, opera, diversity, tragedy, triumph, and the everyday lives of men, women, and children.
Categories: History

Allie Victoria Tennant and the Visual Arts in Dallas

Allie Victoria Tennant and the Visual Arts in Dallas

Mary Jane Gentry, The Birth of a Texas Ghost Town: Thurber, 1886–1933, ed. T. Lindsay Baker, 83–84. Tennant proved to be popular with most of the townsfolk, who called him Tom. 20. One historical study of Texas women has noted: “Girls ...

Author: Light Townsend Cummins

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781623493288

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 370

Winner, 2016 Liz Carpenter Award for the Research in the History of Women, presented at the Texas State Historical Association Annual Meeting At Fair Park in Dallas, a sculpture of a Native American figure, bronze with gilded gold leaf, strains a bow before sending an arrow into flight. Tejas Warrior has welcomed thousands of visitors since the Texas Centennial Exposition opened in the 1930s. The iconic piece is instantly recognizable, yet few people know about its creator: Allie Victoria Tennant, one of a notable group of Texas artists who actively advanced regionalist art in the decades before World War II. Light Townsend Cummins follows Tennant’s public career from the 1920s to the 1960s, both as an artist and as a culture-bearer, as she advanced cultural endeavors, including the arts. A true pathfinder, she helped to create and nurture art institutions that still exist today, most especially the Dallas Museum of Art, on whose board of trustees she sat for almost thirty years. Tennant also worked on behalf of other civic institutions, including the public schools, art academies, and the State Fair of Texas, where she helped create the Women’s Building. Allie Victoria Tennant and the Visual Arts in Dallas sheds new light on an often overlooked artist.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Ranger Ideal Volume 2

The Ranger Ideal Volume 2

Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1874-1930 Darren L. Ivey ... Rawhide Texas. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1965. The Garza Revolution, 1891–1893: Records of the U.S. ... The Birth of a Texas Ghost Town: Thurber, 1886–1933.

Author: Darren L. Ivey

Publisher: University of North Texas Press

ISBN: 9781574417449

Category: History

Page: 816

View: 227

They say everything is bigger in Texas, and the Lone Star State can certainly boast of immense ranches, vast oil fields, enormous cowboy hats, and larger-than-life heroes. Among the greatest of the latter are the iconic Texas Rangers, a service that has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum continues to honor these legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. While upholding a proud heritage of duty and sacrifice, even men who wear the cinco peso badge can have their own champions. Thirty-one individuals—whose lives span more than two centuries—have been enshrined in the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame. In The Ranger Ideal Volume 2: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1874-1930, Darren L. Ivey presents capsule biographies of the twelve inductees who served Texas in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Ivey begins with John B. Jones, who directed his Rangers through their development from state troops to professional lawmen; then covers Leander H. McNelly, John B. Armstrong, James B. Gillett, Jesse Lee Hall, George W. Baylor, Bryan Marsh, and Ira Aten—the men who were responsible for some of the Rangers’ most legendary feats. Ivey concludes with James A. Brooks, William J. McDonald, John R. Hughes, and John H. Rogers, the “Four Great Captains” who guided the Texas Rangers into the twentieth century.
Categories: History

The Texas Calaboose and Other Forgotten Jails

The Texas Calaboose and Other Forgotten Jails

... of Empire on the Postmodern Frontier Sara L. Spurgeon Undaunted: A Norwegian Woman in Frontier Texas Charles H. Russell Lost Years of William S. Burroughs: Beats in South Texas Robert E. Johnson Birth of a Texas Ghost Town Thurber, ...

Author: William E. Moore

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781623497156

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 161

A calaboose is, quite simply, a tiny jail. Designed to house prisoners only for a short time, a calaboose could be anything from an iron cage to a poured concrete blockhouse. Easily constructed and more affordable for small communities than a full-sized building, calabooses once dotted the rural landscape. Though a relic of a bygone era in law enforcement and no longer in use, many calabooses remain in communities throughout Texas, often hidden in plain sight. In The Texas Calaboose and Other Forgotten Jails, William E. Moore has compiled the first guidebook to extant calabooses in Texas. He explores the history of the calaboose, including its construction, use, and eventual decline, but the heart of the book is in the alphabetically arranged photo tour of calabooses across the state. Each entry is accompanied by a vignette describing the unique features of the calaboose at hand, any infamous or otherwise memorable occupants, and the state of the calaboose at present. Most have been long abandoned, but because many remain on city or town property, some have been repurposed into storage buildings or even government offices. In certain ways, these small jails encapsulate the history of outlying communities during a time of transition from the “Wild West” to the twentieth century. Some of the structures have been preserved and cared-for, but despite the stories they can tell, many more are endangered or have already been lost. This definitive guide to tiny Texas jails serves as a record of a unique and disappearing feature of our heritage.
Categories: History

Nameless Towns

Nameless Towns

64. Block, East Texas Mill Towns and Ghost Towns, 1:215–218. 65. Montgomery, “Before and After the Birth of Wiergate, Texas,” 331. 66. Earl Hines self-interview, 1982. 67. Quoted in Bowman, The 35 Best Ghost Towns of East Texas, 43. 68.

Author: Thad Sitton

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292777262

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 179

Winner, T. H. Fehrenbach Award, Texas Historical Commission Sawmill communities were once the thriving centers of East Texas life. Many sprang up almost overnight in a pine forest clearing, and many disappeared just as quickly after the company "cut out" its last trees. But during their heyday, these company towns made Texas the nation's third-largest lumber producer and created a colorful way of life that lingers in the memories of the remaining former residents and their children and grandchildren. Drawing on oral history, company records, and other archival sources, Sitton and Conrad recreate the lifeways of the sawmill communities. They describe the companies that ran the mills and the different kinds of jobs involved in logging and milling. They depict the usually rough-hewn towns, with their central mill, unpainted houses, company store, and schools, churches, and community centers. And they characterize the lives of the people, from the hard, awesomely dangerous mill work to the dances, picnics, and other recreations that offered welcome diversions.
Categories: History