The Final Mission

The Final Mission

Relates the story of bomber pilot Henry Supchak, who was captured by German soldiers after his aircraft crashed in Austria but received help from a young Austrian boy who secretly brought him food and water, and his reunion eighty years ...

Author: Elizabeth Hoban

Publisher: Westholme Publishing

ISBN: 159416181X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 286

View: 309

Relates the story of bomber pilot Henry Supchak, who was captured by German soldiers after his aircraft crashed in Austria but received help from a young Austrian boy who secretly brought him food and water, and his reunion eighty years later with his Austrian savior.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Final Mission

The Final Mission

In July 1944, bomber pilot Henry Supchak lost control of his aircraft and crashed at the base of an Austrian mountain.

Author: Elizabeth Hoban

Publisher:

ISBN: 1594165467

Category: Bomber pilots

Page: 286

View: 615

In July 1944, bomber pilot Henry Supchak lost control of his aircraft and crashed at the base of an Austrian mountain. Held for days at a small village, Supchak remembered a small boy who would sneak into their holding area with food and water until German soldiers relocated the pilot and his crew to a detention camp. Nearly eighty years later, plagued by nightmares of war, Supchak hopes to reunite his former crewmates to make peace with his life, unaware that half a world away, an Austrian entrepreneuer who barely remembers helping the captured American soldiers is on the same quest.
Categories: Bomber pilots

The Final Mission of Bottoms Up

The Final Mission of Bottoms Up

A World War II Pilot's Story Dennis R. Okerstrom ... The biggest unspoken tension was the fact that Reynolds's wife was obviously pregnant, and Reynolds had quietly passed on to Lamar his certainty that the child could not be his.

Author: Dennis R. Okerstrom

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826219480

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 108

Tells the story of Lieutenant Lee Lamar, copilot of the B-24 "Bottoms Up," after his plane was shot down in 1944, recounting his capture and imprisonment as a POW, the identification of his plane's wreckage sixty years later by a Croatian archaeologist, and his journey back to Croatia with the author in hopes of gaining closure.
Categories: History

The Last Mission of the Wham Bam Boys

The Last Mission of the Wham Bam Boys

Courage, Tragedy, and Justice in World War II Gregory A. Freeman. in Alabama, Rogers went on to flight training at Chatham Field in Savannah, Georgia, now the Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport. He became an Army Air Corps pilot ...

Author: Gregory A. Freeman

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 023012027X

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 505

Before the famed Nuremberg Tribunal, there was Rüsselsheim, a small German town, where ordinary civilians were tried in the first War Crimes Trial of World War II. As the tide of World War II turned, a hitherto unknown incident set a precedent for how we would bring wartime crimes to justice: In August 1944, the 9- man crew of an American bomber was forced to bail out over Germany. As their captors marched them into Rüsselsheim, a small town recently bombed to smithereens by Allies, they were attacked by an angry mob of civilians -- farmers, shopkeepers, railroad workers, women, and children. With a local Nazi chief at the helm, they assaulted the young Americans with stones, bricks, and wooden clubs. They beat them viciously and left them for dead at the nearby cemetery. It could have been another forgotten tragedy of the war. But when the lynching was briefly mentioned in a London paper a few months later, it caught the eye of two Army majors, Luke Rogers and Leon Jaworski. Their investigation uncovered the real human cost of the war: the parents and a newlywed wife who agonized over the fate of the men, and the devastating effect of modern warfare on civilian populations. Rogers and Jaworski put the city of Rüsselsheim on trial, insisting on the rule of law even amidst the horrors of war. Drawing from trial records, government archives, interviews with family members, and personal letters, highly-acclaimed military historian Gregory A. Freeman brings to life for the first time the dramatic story. Taking the reader to the scene of the crime and into the homes of the crew, he exposes the stark realities of war to show how ordinary citizens could be drawn to commit horrific acts of wartime atrocities, and the far-reaching effects on generations.
Categories: History

Fly Boy Heroes

Fly Boy Heroes

“He Just Likes to Hunt—Fiery Ginger's Thunderbolt Ace Pilot Has Ration Trouble Too. ... “Nathan Gordon Won the Medal of Honor for His Heroics during World War II. ... 38th Bomb Group, Final Mission Report, August 18, 1943.

Author: James H. Hallas

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780811771320

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 750

On the morning of December 7, 1941, Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John W. Finn, though suffering multiple wounds, continued to man his machine gun against waves of Japanese aircraft attacking the Kaneohe Bay Naval Station during the infamous Pearl Harbor raid. Just over three years later, as World War II struggled into its final months, a B-29 radioman named Red Erwin lingered near death after suffering horrific burns to save his air crew in the skies off Japan. They were the first and last of thirty U.S. Navy, Army, and Marine Corps aviation personnel awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions against the Japanese during World War II. They included pilots and crewmen manning fighters and dive bombers and flying boats and bombers. One was a general. Another was a sergeant. Some shot down large numbers of enemy aircraft in aerial combat. Others sacrificed themselves for their friends or risked everything for complete strangers. Who were these now largely forgotten men? Where did they come from? What inspired them to rise “above and beyond”? What, if anything, made them different? Virtually all had one thing in common: they always wanted to fly. They came from a generation that revered the aces of World War I, like Eddie Rickenbacker, the civilian flyer Charles Lindbergh, and the lost aviator Amelia Earhart—and then they blazed their own trail during World War II.
Categories: History

The Last Fighter Pilot

The Last Fighter Pilot

The True Story of the Final Combat Mission of World War II Don Brown ... During the war, cigarettes became a popular pastime with many of the pilots. Al was a Lucky Strikes guy; Jerry preferred Chesterfields.

Author: Don Brown

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781621575559

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 815

*A NATIONAL BESTSELLER!* The New York Post calls The Last Fighter Pilot a "must-read" book. From April to August of 1945, Captain Jerry Yellin and a small group of fellow fighter pilots flew dangerous bombing and strafe missions out of Iwo Jima over Japan. Even days after America dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima on August 6 and Nagasaki on August 9, the pilots continued to fly. Though Japan had suffered unimaginable devastation, the emperor still refused to surrender. Bestselling author Don Brown (Treason) sits down with Yelllin, now ninety-three years old, to tell the incredible true story of the final combat mission of World War II. Nine days after Hiroshima, on the morning of August 14th, Yellin and his wingman 1st Lieutenant Phillip Schlamberg took off from Iwo Jima to bomb Tokyo. By the time Yellin returned to Iwo Jima, the war was officially over—but his young friend Schlamberg would never get to hear the news. The Last Fighter Pilot is a harrowing first-person account of war from one of America's last living World War II veterans.
Categories: History

The Final Mission of Bottoms Up

The Final Mission of Bottoms Up

This is the story of the young men who flew Bottoms Up on her final mission, of Lamar’s trip back to the scene of his recurring nightmare, and of a remarkable convergence of international courage, perseverance, and friendship.

Author: Dennis R. Okerstrom

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826272676

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 949

On November 18, 1944, the end of the war in Europe finally in sight, American copilot Lieutenant Lee Lamar struggled alongside pilot Randall Darden to keep Bottoms Up, their B-24J Liberator, in the air. They and their crew of eight young men had believed the intelligence officer who, at the predawn briefing at their base in southern Italy, had confided that their mission that day would be a milk run. But that twenty-first mission out of Italy would be their last. Bottoms Up was staggered by an antiaircraft shell that sent it plunging three miles earthward, the pilots recovering control at just 5,000 feet. With two engines out, they tried to make it to a tiny strip on a British-held island in the Adriatic Sea and in desperation threw out everything not essential to flight: machine guns, belts of ammunition, flak jackets. But over Pula, in what is now Croatia, they were once more hit by German fire, and the focus quickly became escaping the doomed bomber. Seemingly unable to extricate himself, Lamar all but surrendered to death before fortuitously bailing out. He was captured the next day and spent the rest of the war as a prisoner at a stalag on the Baltic Sea, suffering the deprivations of little food and heat in Europe’s coldest winter in a century. He never saw most of his crew again. Then, in 2006, more than sixty years after these life-changing experiences, Lamar received an email from Croatian archaeologist Luka Bekic, who had discovered the wreckage of Bottoms Up. A veteran of the Balkan wars of the 1990s, Bekic felt compelled to find out the crew’s identities and fates. Lee Lamar, a boy from a hardscrabble farm in rural northwestern Missouri, had gone to college on the GI Bill, become a civil engineer, gotten married, and raised a family. Yet, for all the opportunity that stemmed from his wartime service, part of him was lost. The prohibition on asking prisoners of war their memories during the repatriation process prevented him from reconciling himself to the events of that November day. That changed when, nearly a year after being contacted by Bekic, Lamar visited the site, hoping to gain closure, and met the Croatian Partisans who had helped some members of his crew escape. In this absorbing, alternating account of World War II and its aftermath, Dennis R. Okerstrom chronicles, through Lee Lamar’s experiences, the Great Depression generation who went on to fight in the most expensive war in history. This is the story of the young men who flew Bottoms Up on her final mission, of Lamar’s trip back to the scene of his recurring nightmare, and of a remarkable convergence of international courage, perseverance, and friendship.
Categories: History

Thunderbolt to War

Thunderbolt to War

These craft would be the saviour of many airmen during the Second World War. ... (Petticrew, via Cross) I flew as a replacement pilot with Bill's Buzz Boys. ... The final mission on the 12th was the last one for the 'Buzz Boys'.

Author: John Anderson

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 144

Thunderbolt to War gives a remarkable personal insight into the structure and operations of a leading USAAF Fighter Squadron in Britain during the Second World War. This theme is explored through the recorded thoughts and feelings of Clint Sperry, a skilled fighter pilot who was seconded to England with the 353rd Fighter Group—the rarely celebrated workhorse of Eighth Fighter Command. Despite the relative anonymity of the Group, the names of its charismatic leaders still resonate today, including the eighteen-victory ace Walter Beckham and the aggressive Glenn E. Duncan. Clint and his colleagues suffered many frustrating and perilous experiences during the war; they encountered enemy fighters, flak, treacherous weather, and mechanical problems throughout the bloody battles over Europe. To survive was a lottery, but Clint’s experience and aptitude served him well. This account follows the soaring successes and devastating traumas that Clint experienced, culminating in a vivid picture of a fighter pilot’s war. He flew 106 missions in his favoured P47 Thunderbolt, and was credited with destroying or probably destroying five enemy aircraft—in addition to destroying many targets on the ground by strafing and bombing. Clint was awarded three DFCs for his courage, and gained the enduring respect of his son, Steve, and his friend, John Anderson. Their richly illustrated account of his life pays tribute to a true American hero. Illustrations: 118 black-and-white illustrations
Categories: History

The Last Mission

The Last Mission

From their base in England, he and his crew fly twenty-four treacherous bombing missions over occupied Europe. The war is almost over and Hitler near defeat when they fly their last mission -- a mission destined for disaster.

Author: Harry Mazer

Publisher: Laurel Leaf

ISBN: 9780307536600

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 192

View: 316

In 1944, as World War II is raging across Europe, fifteen-year-old Jack Raab dreams of being a hero. Leaving New York City, his family, and his boyhood behind, Jack uses a false I.D. and lies his way into the U.S. Air Force. From their base in England, he and his crew fly twenty-four treacherous bombing missions over occupied Europe. The war is almost over and Hitler near defeat when they fly their last mission -- a mission destined for disaster. Shot down far behind enemy lines, Jack is taken prisoner and sent to a German POW camp, where his experiences are more terrifying than anything he'd ever imagined.
Categories: Young Adult Fiction

Bomber Boy

Bomber Boy

It starred Errol Flynn, Basil Rathbone, and David Niven as Royal Flying Corps fighter pilots in World War I. Both films were ... chivalry between combatants (woven around the legend of the 'Red Baron'); and the desperate final mission.

Author: Dereck French

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 9781445684666

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 225

A vivid and insightful account of the early World War Two air war from a bomber pilot's perspective.
Categories: History