The German Theatre

The German Theatre

THE HE GERMAN THEATRE has now reached its twentieth number , and the proprietors have infinite reason to be satisfied with the reception the work has experienced : they , at the same time , flatter themselves , that nothing on their ...

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ISBN: MINN:31951002184971Z

Category: English drama

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View: 541

Categories: English drama

Rainer Werner Fassbinder and the German Theatre

Rainer Werner Fassbinder and the German Theatre

the number of stages owned by the theatres had risen almost threefold from 104 to 286.3 Decentralization , like state funding , has important effects . The West German theatre scene has significant centres up and down the country .

Author: David Barnett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521855144

Category: Drama

Page: 300

View: 874

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Categories: Drama

The German Theatre Tr by Benjamin Thompson Esq

The German Theatre  Tr  by Benjamin Thompson  Esq

THE GERMAN THEATRE has now reached its twentieth number , and the proprietors have infinite reason to be satisfied with the reception the work has experienced : they , at the same time , flatter themselves , that nothing on their part ...

Author: Benjamin Thompson

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3138579

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View: 256

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Jews and the Making of Modern German Theatre

Jews and the Making of Modern German Theatre

Young German Jewish intellectuals associated with Hermann Struck—Sammy Gronemann and Hans Goslar, who had served on the Eastern Front during World War I and “discovered” Yiddish Theatre there—later brought part of the Vilna Troupe to ...

Author: Jeanette R. Malkin

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 9781587299346

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 183

While it is common knowledge that Jews were prominent in literature, music, cinema, and science in pre-1933 Germany, the fascinating story of Jewish co-creation of modern German theatre is less often discussed. Yet for a brief time, during the Second Reich and the Weimar Republic, Jewish artists and intellectuals moved away from a segregated Jewish theatre to work within canonic German theatre and performance venues, claiming the right to be part of the very fabric of German culture. Their involvement, especially in the theatre capital of Berlin, was of a major magnitude both numerically and in terms of power and influence. The essays in this stimulating collection etch onto the conventional view of modern German theatre the history and conflicts of its Jewish participants in the last third of the nineteenth and first third of the twentieth centuries and illuminate the influence of Jewish ethnicity in the creation of the modernist German theatre. The nontraditional forms and themes known as modernism date roughly from German unification in 1871 to the end of the Weimar Republic in 1933. This is also the period when Jews acquired full legal and trade equality, which enabled their ownership and directorship of theatre and performance venues. The extraordinary artistic innovations that Germans and Jews co-created during the relatively short period of this era of creativity reached across the old assumptions, traditions, and prejudices that had separated people as the modern arts sought to reformulate human relations from the foundations to the pinnacles of society. The essayists, writing from a variety of perspectives, carve out historical overviews of the role of theatre in the constitution of Jewish identity in Germany, the position of Jewish theatre artists in the cultural vortex of imperial Berlin, the role played by theatre in German Jewish cultural education, and the impact of Yiddish theatre on German and Austrian Jews and on German theatre. They view German Jewish theatre activity through Jewish philosophical and critical perspectives and examine two important genres within which Jewish artists were particularly prominent: the Cabaret and Expressionist theatre. Finally, they provide close-ups of the Jewish artists Alexander Granach, Shimon Finkel, Max Reinhardt, and Leopold Jessner. By probing the interplay between “Jewish” and “German” cultural and cognitive identities based in the field of theatre and performance and querying the effect of theatre on Jewish self-understanding, they add to the richness of intercultural understanding as well as to the complex history of theatre and performance in Germany.
Categories: Performing Arts

The First German Theatre Routledge Revivals

The First German Theatre  Routledge Revivals

The miserable state of German theatre until the final third of the eighteenth century was the result of several factors. Since Germany was divided into 360 states, each with its own laws, currency, measurements and its almost invariably ...

Author: Michael Patterson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317266846

Category: Drama

Page: 219

View: 720

First published in 1990. The book surveys of the development of German theatre from a market sideshow into an important element of cultural life and political expression. It examines Schiller as ‘theatre poet’ at Mannheim, Goethe’s work as director of the court theatre at Weimar, and then traces the rapid commercial decline that made it difficult for Kleist and impossible for Büchner to see their plays staged in their own lifetime. Four representative texts are analysed: Schiller’s The Robbers, Goethe’s Iphigenia on Tauris, Kleist’s The Prince of Homburg, and Büchner’s Woyzeck. This title will be of interest to students of theatre and German literature.
Categories: Drama

Historical Dictionary of German Theater

Historical Dictionary of German Theater

Readers desirous of further inquiries should without hesitation consult Patterson's German Theatre: A Bibliography. Paul Stanley Ulrich's A Preliminary Bibliography of German-Language Theatre Almanacs, Yearbooks, Calendars and Journals ...

Author: William Grange

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442250208

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 484

View: 687

This second edition of Historical Dictionary of German Theater covers German theater’s history through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Revolution in German Theatre 1900 1933 Routledge Revivals

The Revolution in German Theatre 1900 1933  Routledge Revivals

In addition to the fragmentary and inconclusive nature of these sources there are further reasons why the theatre practice of ... But, uncharacteristically for the Germans, until Piscator and Brecht, most of this brilliant generation of ...

Author: Michael Patterson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317217923

Category: Drama

Page: 244

View: 668

First published in 1981, this book represents the first work in English to give a comprehensive account of the revolutionary developments in German theatre from the decline of Naturalism through the Expressionist upheaval to the political theatre of Piscator and Brecht. Early productions of Kaiser’s From Morning till Midnight and Toller’s Transfiguration are presented as examples of Expressionism. A thorough analysis of Piscator’s Hoppla, Such is Life! And Brecht’s Man show the similarities and differences in political theatre. In addition, elements of stage-craft are examined — illustrated with tabulated information, an extensive chronology, and photographs and designs of productions.
Categories: Drama

Theatre in Europe Under German Occupation

Theatre in Europe Under German Occupation

only due to the quality of German playwriting but also thanks to the superior way of organising and funding the theatre, a system envied by “theatre practitioners in all cultured nations, even the ones presently at war with us”.

Author: Anselm Heinrich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317628866

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 396

The Second World War went beyond previous military conflicts. It was not only about specific geographical gains or economic goals, but also about the brutal and lasting reshaping of Europe as a whole. Theatre in Europe Under German Occupation explores the part that theatre played in the Nazi war effort. Using a case-study approach, it illustrates the crucial and heavily subsidised role of theatre as a cultural extension of the military machine, key to Nazi Germany’s total war doctrine. Covering theatres in Oslo, Riga, Lille, Lodz, Krakau, Warsaw, Prague, The Hague and Kiev, Anselm Heinrich looks at the history and context of their operation; the wider political, cultural and propagandistic implications in view of their function in wartime; and their legacies. Theatre in Europe Under German Occupation focuses for the first time on Nazi Germany’s attempts to control and shape the cultural sector in occupied territories, shedding new light on the importance of theatre for the regime’s military and political goals.
Categories: History

Shakespeare on the German Stage Volume 1 1586 1914

Shakespeare on the German Stage  Volume 1  1586 1914

Professor Williams focuses on the classical period of German literature and theatre, when Shakespeare's plays were first staged in Germany in a relatively complete form, and when they had a potent influence on the writings of German drama ...

Author: Simon Williams

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521611938

Category: Drama

Page: 260

View: 413

Professor Williams focuses on the classical period of German literature and theatre, when Shakespeare's plays were first staged in Germany in a relatively complete form, and when they had a potent influence on the writings of German drama and dramatic criticism.
Categories: Drama

The Problem of the Actress in Modern German Theater and Thought

The Problem of the Actress in Modern German Theater and Thought

24 For him, Reinhardt's position as head of the Deutsches Theater in Berlin denigrated a vital German cultural institution, and he therefore declares: “The German Theater has become an un-German theater” (ibid.).

Author: Sara E. Jackson

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9781640140868

Category: Drama

Page: 246

View: 511

Around 1900, German and Austrian actresses had allure and status, apparent autonomy, and unconventional lifestyles. They presented a complex problem socially and aesthetically, one tied to the so-called Woman Question and to the contested status of modernity. For modernists, the actress's socioeconomic mobility and defiance of gender norms opened space to contest social and moral strictures, and her mutability offered a means to experiment with identity. For conservatives, on the other hand, female performance could support antifeminist convictions and validate masculine authority by positing woman as nothing but a false surface shaped by productive male forces. Influential male-authored texts from the period thereby disavowed female subjectivity per se by equating "woman" and "actress." S. E. Jackson establishes the actress as a key figure in a discursive matrix surrounding modernity, gender, and subjectivity. Her central argument is that because the figure of the actress bridged such varied fields of thought, women who were actresses had a consequential impact that resonated in and far beyond the theater - but has not been explored. Examining archival sources such as theater reviews and writing by actresses in direct relation to canonical aesthetic and philosophical texts, The Problem of the Actress reconstructs the constitutive role that womenplayed on and off the stage in shaping not only modernist theater aesthetics and performance practices, but also influential strains of modern thought.
Categories: Drama