The Gothic and the Rule of the Law 1764 1820

The Gothic and the Rule of the Law  1764 1820

This book is the first full-length theoretical and historical study of the relation between early Gothic fiction and an emerging modern rule of law.

Author: Sue Chaplin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230801400

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 183

View: 915

This book is the first full-length theoretical and historical study of the relation between early Gothic fiction and an emerging modern rule of law. The work identifies not only a political and cultural, but also an ontological relation between what critics have conceptualized as 'Gothic' and the nature and function of modern juridical power.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Transatlantic Gothic Novel and the Law 1790 1860

The Transatlantic Gothic Novel and the Law  1790   1860

Although readers may live in “more enlightened times,” the legal system is still full of horrors for the accused innocent and the average citizen. sue chaplin's The Gothic and the Rule of Law, 17641820 (2007) explores the ways that the ...

Author: Bridget M. Marshall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317013723

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 714

Tracing the use of legal themes in the gothic novel, Bridget M. Marshall shows these devices reflect an outpouring of anxiety about the nature of justice. On both sides of the Atlantic, novelists like William Godwin, Mary Shelley, Charles Brockden Brown, and Hannah Crafts question the foundations of the Anglo-American justice system through their portrayals of criminal and judicial procedures and their use of found documents and legal forms as key plot devices. As gothic villains, from Walpole's Manfred to Godwin's Tyrrell to Stoker's Dracula, manipulate the law and legal system to expand their power, readers are confronted with a legal system that is not merely ineffective at stopping villains but actually enables them to inflict ever greater harm on their victims. By invoking actual laws like the Black Act in England or the Fugitive Slave Act in America, gothic novels connect the fantastic horrors that constitute their primary appeal with much more shocking examples of terror and injustice. Finally, the gothic novel's preoccupation with injustice is just one element of many that connects the genre to slave narratives and to the horrors of American slavery.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Britain France and the Gothic 1764 1820

Britain  France and the Gothic  1764 1820

(See Sue Chaplin, The Gothic and the Rule ofthe Law, 17641820 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), p. 56.) Horace Walpole, Preface to the first edition of The Castle of Otranto (1764) (London: 1765), p. 9.

Author: Angela Wright

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107034068

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 231

View: 910

Explores the development of the Gothic through the history of martial, political and literary conflict between Britain and France.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Servants and the Gothic 1764 1831

Servants and the Gothic  1764 1831

Diane Long Hoeveler, Gothic Feminism: The Professionalization of Gender from Charlotte Smith to the Brontës (Liverpool: Liverpool ... Sue Chaplin, The Gothic and the Rule of Law, 17641820 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), p. 77.

Author: Kathleen Hudson

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 9781786833419

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 777

This volume provides readers with a comprehensive literary and historical basis for understanding servant characters and servant narratives in the early Gothic mode. Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, servants were ‘othered’ figures whose voices had the potential to undermine socio-political and personal identity. This study recasts servant characters within the early Gothic mode as ‘narrators’ who verbally or non-verbally perform dialogue, moral insights and folkloric or gossip-based stories. Examining the development of servant narrative within the early Gothic mode, Servants and the Gothic outlines the socio-historical and literary influences which defined the servant voice during the eighteenth century, as well as identifying and expanding upon the ways in which servant narratives contributed to each author’s unique goals. It redefines servant narratives as a Gothic ‘performance’, a self-conscious self-examination of the ways in which a Gothic narrative impacts literary, social and personal identity.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Encyclopedia of the Gothic

The Encyclopedia of the Gothic

A Companion to the Gothic. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 15–26. Williams, A. (1995) The Art of Darkness: The Poetics of Gothic. Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press. FURTHER READING Chaplin, S. (2007) Gothic and the Rule of the Law, 17641820 ...

Author: David Punter

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119210467

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 880

View: 718

THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE GOTHIC “Well written and interesting [it is] a testament to the breadth and depth of knowledge about its central subject among the more than 130 contributing writers, and also among the three editors, each of whom is a significant figure in the field of gothic studies ... A reference work that’s firmly rooted in and actively devoted to expressing the current state of academic scholarship about its area.” New York Journal of Books “A substantial achievement.” Reference Reviews Comprehensive and wide-ranging, The Encyclopedia of the Gothic brings together over 200 newly-commissioned essays by leading scholars writing on all aspects of the Gothic as it is currently taught and researched, along with challenging insights into the development of the genre and its impact on contemporary culture. The A-Z entries provide comprehensive coverage of relevant authors, national traditions, critical developments, and notable texts that continue to define, shape, and inform the genre. The volume’s approach is truly interdisciplinary, with essays by specialist international contributors whose expertise extends beyond Gothic literature to film, music, drama, art, and architecture. From Angels and American Gothic to Wilde and Witchcraft, The Encyclopedia of the Gothic is the definitive reference guide to all aspects of this strange and wondrous genre. The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Literature is a comprehensive, scholarly, authoritative, and critical overview of literature and theory comprising individual titles covering key literary genres, periods, and sub-disciplines. Available both in print and online, this groundbreaking resource provides students, teachers, and researchers with cutting-edge scholarship in literature and literary studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women s Authorship and the Early Gothic

Women s Authorship and the Early Gothic

135–49 Chaplin, Sue, The Gothic and the Rule of the Law, 17641820 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007) Chard, Chloe, 'Introduction', in Ann Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest, ed. Chloe Chard (Oxford: Oxford University Press, ...

Author: Kathleen Hudson

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 9781786836120

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 906

This edited collection examines Gothic works written by women authors in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, with a specific focus on the novels and chapbooks produced by less widely commercially and critically popular writers. Bringing these authors to the forefront of contemporary critical examinations of the Gothic, chapters in this collection examine how these works impacted the development of ‘women’s writing’ and Gothic writing during this time. Offering readers an original look at the literary landscape of the period and the roles of the creative women who defined it, the collection argues that such works reflected a female-centred literary subculture defined by creative exchange and innovation, one that still shapes perceptions of the Gothic mode today. This collection, then, presents an alternative understanding of the legacy of women Gothic authors, anchoring this understanding in complex historical and social contexts and providing a new world of Gothic literature for readers to explore.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Palgrave Handbook of Gothic Origins

The Palgrave Handbook of Gothic Origins

Sue Chaplin, The Gothic and the Rule of Law, 17641820 (Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), 44. 35. Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1764–9), vol. 2, 2. 36.

Author: Clive Bloom

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030845629

Category: Fiction

Page: 618

View: 551

This handbook provides a comprehensive overview of research on the Gothic Revival. The Gothic Revival was based on emotion rather than reason and when Horace Walpole created Strawberry Hill House, a gleaming white castle on the banks of the Thames, he had to create new words to describe the experience of gothic lifestyle. Nevertheless, Walpole’s house produced nightmares and his book The Castle of Otranto was the first truly gothic novel, with supernatural, sensational and Shakespearean elements challenging the emergent fiction of social relationships. The novel’s themes of violence, tragedy, death, imprisonment, castle battlements, dungeons, fair maidens, secrets, ghosts and prophecies led to a new genre encompassing prose, theatre, poetry and painting, whilst opening up a whole world of imagination for entrepreneurial female writers such as Mary Shelley, Joanna Baillie and Ann Radcliffe, whose immensely popular books led to the intense inner landscapes of the Bronte sisters. Matthew Lewis’s The Monk created a new gothic: atheistic, decadent, perverse, necrophilic and hellish. The social upheaval of the French Revolution and the emergence of the Romantic movement with its more intense (and often) atheistic self-absorption led the gothic into darker corners of human experience with a greater emphasis on the inner life, hallucination, delusion, drug addiction, mental instability, perversion and death and the emerging science of psychology. The intensity of the German experience led to an emphasis on doubles and schizophrenic behaviour, ghosts, spirits, mesmerism, the occult and hell. This volume charts the origins of this major shift in social perceptions and completes a trilogy of Palgrave Handbooks on the Gothic—combined they provide an exhaustive survey of current research in Gothic studies, a go-to for students and researchers alike.
Categories: Fiction

The Transatlantic Gothic Novel and the Law 1790 1860

The Transatlantic Gothic Novel and the Law  1790   1860

Sue Chaplin's The Gothic and the Rule of Law, 1764-1820 (2007) explores the ways that the Gothic "exposes the impossibility of coherent juridical narratives" (174). Her focus on early Gothic novels in England is enlightening, ...

Author: Professor Bridget M Marshall

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409476320

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 751

Tracing the use of legal themes in the gothic novel, Bridget M. Marshall shows these devices reflect an outpouring of anxiety about the nature of justice. On both sides of the Atlantic, novelists like William Godwin, Mary Shelley, Charles Brockden Brown, and Hannah Crafts question the foundations of the Anglo-American justice system through their portrayals of criminal and judicial procedures and their use of found documents and legal forms as key plot devices. As gothic villains, from Walpole's Manfred to Godwin's Tyrrell to Stoker's Dracula, manipulate the law and legal system to expand their power, readers are confronted with a legal system that is not merely ineffective at stopping villains but actually enables them to inflict ever greater harm on their victims. By invoking actual laws like the Black Act in England or the Fugitive Slave Act in America, gothic novels connect the fantastic horrors that constitute their primary appeal with much more shocking examples of terror and injustice. Finally, the gothic novel's preoccupation with injustice is just one element of many that connects the genre to slave narratives and to the horrors of American slavery.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Representing Place in British Literature and Culture 1660 1830

Representing Place in British Literature and Culture  1660 1830

2 See Cannon Schmitt, Alien Nation: Nineteenth-Century Gothic Fictions and English Nationality (Philadelphia: University ... The Gothic and the Rule of Law, 17641820 (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007); David Collings, ...

Author: Evan Gottlieb

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317065883

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 936

Revising traditional 'rise of the nation-state' narratives, this collection explores the development of and interactions among various forms of local, national, and transnational identities and affiliations during the long eighteenth century. By treating place as historically contingent and socially constructed, this volume examines how Britons experienced and related to a landscape altered by agricultural and industrial modernization, political and religious reform, migration, and the building of nascent overseas empires. In mapping the literary and cultural geographies of the long eighteenth century, the volume poses three challenges to common critical assumptions about the relationships among genre, place, and periodization. First, it questions the novel’s exclusive hold on the imagining of national communities by examining how poetry, drama, travel-writing, and various forms of prose fiction each negotiated the relationships between the local, national, and global in distinct ways. Second, it demonstrates how viewing the literature and culture of the long eighteenth century through a broadly conceived lens of place brings to the foreground authors typically considered 'minor' when seen through more traditional aesthetic, cultural, or theoretical optics. Finally, it contextualizes Romanticism’s long-standing associations with the local and the particular, suggesting that literary localism did not originate in the Romantic era, but instead emerged from previous literary and cultural explorations of space and place. Taken together, the essays work to displace the nation-state as a central category of literary and cultural analysis in eighteenth-century studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Law and Literature

Law and Literature

10 David Durant, “Ann Radcliffe and the conservative Gothic,” Studies in English Literature 1500–1900, 22 (1982), 520. 11 Susan Chaplin, The Gothic and the Rule of the Law, 17641820 (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), p. 2.

Author: Kieran Dolin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108395250

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 179

Law and Literature presents an authoritative, fresh and accessible new overview of the many ways in which law and literature interact. Written by a team of international experts, it provides a multi-focused history of literary studies' critical interest in ideas of law and justice. It examines the effects of law on writers and their work, ranging from classical tragedy to comics, and from East Africa to Elizabethan England. Over twenty chapters, contributors reveal the intricate and multivalent historical interactions between law and literature, both past and present, and trace the intellectual genesis of the concept of law in literary studies, focusing on major developments in the history of the interdisciplinary project of law and literature, as well as the changing ideas of law, and the cultural contests in which it has figured. Law and Literature will appeal to graduates and scholars working on the intersection between law and literature and in key related areas such as literature and human rights.
Categories: Literary Criticism