The History of Chinese Animation

The History of Chinese Animation

30 Years of China Artistic Animation . Hangzhou : Zhejiang University Press , 2008 . Cheng Jihua , Li Shaobai & Xing Zuwen . History of China Film . Beijing : China Film Press , 1981 . China Animation Association .

Author: Lijun Sun

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000416275

Category: Social Science

Page: 572

View: 303

China has been one of the first countries to develop its own aesthetic for dynamic images and to create animation films with distinctive characteristics. In recent years, however, and subject to the influence of Western and Japanese animation, the Chinese animation industry has experienced several new stages of development, prompting the question as to where animation in China is heading in the future. This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective. In addition, the book focuses on representative works; themes; directions; artistic styles; techniques; industrial development; government support policies; business models; the nurturing of education and talent; broadcasting systems and animation. Scholars and students who are interested in the history of Chinese animation will benefit from this book and it will appeal additionally to readers interested in Chinese film studies.
Categories: Social Science

The History of Chinese Animation II

The History of Chinese Animation II

30 Years of China Artistic Animation. Hangzhou: Zhejiang University Press, 2008. Cheng Jihua, Li Shaobai & Xing Zuwen. History of China Film. Beijing: China Film Press, 1981. China Animation Association. Footprint Reflections (China ...

Author: Lijun Sun

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000740530

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 345

China has been one of the first countries to develop its own aesthetic for dynamic images and to create animation films with distinctive characteristics. In recent years, however, and subject to the influence of Western and Japanese animation, the Chinese animation industry has experienced several new stages of development, prompting the question as to where animation in China is heading in the future. This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective. In addition, the book focuses on representative works, themes, directions, artistic styles, techniques, industrial development, government support policies, business models, the nurturing of education and talent, broadcasting systems, and animation. Scholars and students who are interested in the history of Chinese animation will benefit from this book and it will appeal additionally to readers interested in Chinese film studies.
Categories: Social Science

The History of Chinese Animation I

The History of Chinese Animation I

30 Years of China Artistic Animation. Hangzhou: Zhejiang University Press. 2008. Cheng Jihua, Li Shaobai & Xing Zuwen. History of China Film. Beijing: China Film Press, 1981. China Animation Association. Footprint Reflections (China ...

Author: Lijun Sun

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000740509

Category: Social Science

Page: 326

View: 882

China has been one of the first countries to develop its own aesthetic for dynamic images and to create animation films with distinctive characteristics. In recent years, however, and subject to the influence of Western and Japanese animation, the Chinese animation industry has experienced several new stages of development, prompting the question as to where animation in China is heading in the future. This book describes the history, present and future of China’s animation industry. The author divides the business’s 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective. In addition, the book focuses on representative works; themes; directions; artistic styles; techniques; industrial development; government support policies; business models; the nurturing of education and talent; broadcasting systems and animation. Scholars and students who are interested in the history of Chinese animation will benefit from this book and it will appeal additionally to readers interested in Chinese film studies.
Categories: Social Science

The History of Chinese Animation I

The History of Chinese Animation I

This book describes the history, present and future of China's animation industry.

Author: Taylor & Francis Group

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1032235721

Category:

Page: 326

View: 373

This book describes the history, present and future of China's animation industry. The author divides the business's 95-year history into six periods and analyses each of these from an historical, aesthetic, and artistic perspective while providing a detailed introduction to representative works from the business.
Categories:

Chinese Animation and Socialism

Chinese Animation and Socialism

This paper, published in 1946, was the earliest and most systematic discussion about the theory of animation in the history of Chinese animation. Chang Guangxi also said that the term donghua (or animation) was coined by Qian Jiajun.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004499607

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 300

View: 287

This is the first book in English on Chinese animation and socialism that introduces the insider viewpoints of socialist animators at the Shanghai Animation Film Studio. A timely and useful reference book for researchers, students, animators, and fans interested in Chinese and even world animation.
Categories: Performing Arts

Chinese Animation Creative Industries and Digital Culture

Chinese Animation  Creative Industries  and Digital Culture

The politics surrounding the Chinese School of animation, which I will discuss later, would, without this swing-back ... as Ehrlich implies, are still obstacles that haunt the study of Chinese animation history, they nonetheless lead to ...

Author: Weihua Wu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351611084

Category: Social Science

Page: 194

View: 364

This book explores the development of the Chinese animation film industry from the beginning of China’s reform process up to the present. It discusses above all the relationship between the communist state’s policies to stimulate "creative industries", concepts of creativity and aesthetics, and the creation and maintenance , through changing circumstances, of a national style by Chinese animators. The book also examines the relationship between Chinese animation, changing technologies including the rise first of television and then of digital media, and youth culture, demonstrating the importance of Chinese animation in Chinese youth culture in the digital age.
Categories: Social Science

The New Generation in Chinese Animation

The New Generation in Chinese Animation

In this sense, Guo Li and Jinying Li consider 'the history of Chinese animation, like Chinese film history, witnessed incessant negotiations between animators and film-makers' innovative endeavours and the political and ideological ...

Author: Shaopeng Chen

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350118966

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 627

In 1995 Chinese animated filmmaking ceased to be a state-run enterprise and was plunged into the free market. Using key animated films as his case studies, Shaopeng Chen examines new generation Chinese animation in its aesthetic and industrial contexts. He argues that, unlike its predecessors, this new generation does not have a distinctive national identity, but represents an important stage of diversity and exploration in the history of Chinese animation. Chen identifies distinct characteristics of new generation filmmaking, including an orientation towards young audiences and the recurring figure of the immortal monkey-like Sun Wukong. He explores how films such as Lotus Lantern/Baolian Deng (1999) responded to competition from American imports such as The Lion King (1994), retaining Chinese iconography while at the same time adopting Hollywood aesthetics and techniques. Addressing the series Boonie Bears/Xiong Chumo (2014-5), Chen focuses on the films' adaptation from the original TV series, and how the films were promoted across generations and by means of both online and offline channels. Discussing the series Kuiba/Kui Ba (2011, 2013, 2014), Chen examines Vasoon Animation Studio's ambitious attempt to create the first Chinese-style high fantasy fictional universe, and considers why the first film was a critical success but a failure at the box-office. He also explores the relationship between Japanese anime and new generation Chinese animation. Finally, Chen considers how word-of-mouth social media engagement lay behind the success of Monkey King: Hero is Back (2015).
Categories: Performing Arts

Chinese Animation

Chinese Animation

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230641041

Category:

Page: 26

View: 849

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: History of Chinese animation, Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf, AI Football GGO, Xiao Xiao, Astro Plan, Calabash Brothers, Zentrix, Old Master Q, Nezha, 3000 Whys of Blue Cat, The Olympic Adventures of Fuwa, Century Sonny, Cyber Weapon Z, Music Up, Lan Mao, Wanderings of Sanmao, Black Cat Detective, Qin's Moon, Chess Player, Tortoise Hanba's Stories, The Dreaming Girl, The Blue Mouse and the Big Faced Cat, SkyEye, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, List of Chinese animated series. Excerpt: Chinese animation (simplified Chinese: traditional Chinese: pinyin: Huarenzhi donghua) or Manhua Anime, in narrow sense, refers to animations that are made in China. In broad sense, it may refers to animations that are made in any Chinese speaking countries such as People's Republic of China (mainland China), Republic of China (Taiwan), Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, etc. The history of Chinese animation began in 1918 when an animation piece from the US titled Out of the Inkwell landed in Shanghai. Cartoon clips were first used in advertisements for domestic products. Though the animation industry did not begin until the arrival of the Wan brothers in 1926. From the first film with sound The Camel's Dance to the first film of notable length Princess Iron Fan, China was relatively on pace with the rest of the world. Though China's golden age of animation would come to a complete halt when the Chinese Communist Party led by Mao Zedong introduced the Cultural Revolution. Many animators were forced to quit. If not for harsh economic conditions, the mistreatment of the Red Guards would threaten their work. The surviving animations would lean closer to propaganda. By the 1980s, Japan would emerge as the animation powerhouse of the Far East, leaving China's industry decimated in reputation and productivity. Though two major changes...
Categories:

Chinese Independent Animation

Chinese Independent Animation

This trend continues to some extent in the more recent work of Paola Voci's China on Video: Smaller-Screen Realities and Sean Macdonald's Animation in China: History, Aesthetics, Media, as well as more articles from Ehrlich and Jin ...

Author: Wenhai Zhou

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030406974

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 222

View: 881

This study of ‘independent’ animation opens up a quietly subversive and vibrant dimension of contemporary Chinese culture which, hitherto, has not received as much attention as dissident art or political activism. Scholarly interest in Chinese animation has increased over the last decade, with attention paid to the conventional media circle of production, distribution and consumption. The ‘independent’ sector has been largely ignored however, until now. By focusing on distinctive independent artists like Pisan and Lei Lei, and situating their work within the present day media ecology, the author examines the relationship between the genre and the sociocultural transformation of contemporary China. Animation, the author argues, has a special significance, as the nature of the animation text is itself multilayered and given to multiple interpretations and avenues of engagement. Through an examination of the affordances of this ‘independent’ media entity, the author explores how this multifaceted cultural form reveals ambiguities that parallel contradictions in art and society. In so doing, independent animation provides a convenient ‘mirror’ for examining how recent social upheavals have been negotiated, and how certain practitioners have found effective ways for discussing the post-Socialist reality within the current political configuration.
Categories: Performing Arts