The India Office 1880 1910

The India Office  1880 1910

Author: Arnold P. Kaminsky

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313249091

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 261

Categories: History

Financing India s Imperial Railways 1875 1914

Financing India s Imperial Railways  1875   1914

295; Kaminsky, The India Office 18801910, p. 282. 8. Chapter 5 for William Mackinnon and Indian railways; S. Jones, Trade and Shipping: Lord Inchcape 1852–1932 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1989), p. 31. 9. Ibid., p. 43.

Author: Stuart Sweeney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317323778

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 122

The Indian railway network began as a liberal experiment to promote trade and commerce, the distribution of food and military mobility. Sweeney's study focuses on Britain's largest overseas investment project during the nineteenth century, offering a new perspective on the Anglo-Indian experience.
Categories: History

Indians in Malaya

Indians in Malaya

C.O.537 Series : The Colonial Office's Straits Settlements supplementary original correspondence , 1873-1898 ( London ) . ... India Office : Judicial proceedings of the Government of India , 1854 , 18801910 ( London ) .

Author: Kernial Singh Sandhu

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521148138

Category: History

Page: 382

View: 903

Professor Sandhu discusses the Indians who lived in Malaya and the effects on Malayan social and economic development, 1786-1957.
Categories: History

Empire Politics and the Creation of the 1935 India Act

Empire  Politics and the Creation of the 1935 India Act

118 One of the few administrative histories of the India Office is Arnold P. Kaminsky, The India Office, 18801910 (Westport, CT, 1986). Hugh Tinker has noted of the India Office advisers that their “entire career was passed in london, ...

Author: Andrew Muldoon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317144311

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 212

The 1935 Government of India Act was arguably the most significant turning point in the history of the British administration in India. The intent of the Act, a proposal for an Indian federation, was the continuation of British control of India, and the deflection of the challenge to the Raj posed by Gandhi, Nehru and the nationalist movement. This book seeks to understand why British administrators and politicians believed that such a strategy would work and what exactly underpinned their reasons. It is argued that British efforts to defuse and disrupt the activities of Indian nationalists in the interwar years were predicated on certain cultural beliefs about Indian political behaviour and capacity. However, this was not simply a case of 'Orientalist' policy-making. Faced with a complicated political situation, a staggering amount of information and a constant need to produce analysis, the officers of the Raj imposed their own cultural expectations upon events and evidence to render them comprehensible. Indians themselves played an often overlooked role in the formulation of this political intelligence, especially the relatively few Indians who maintained close ties to the colonial government such as T.B. Sapru and M.R. Jayakar. These men were not just mediators, as they have frequently been portrayed, but were in fact important tacticians whose activities further demonstrated the weaknesses of the colonial information economy. The author employs recently released archival material, including the Indian Political Intelligence records, to situate the 1935 Act in its multiple and overlapping contexts: internal British culture and politics; the imperial 'information order' in India; and the politics of Indian nationalism. This rich and nuanced study is essential reading for scholars working on British, Indian and imperial history.
Categories: History

Western Women and Imperialism

Western Women and Imperialism

Frances Hutchins , The Illusion of Permanence : British Imperialism in India ( Prince- ton : Princeton University Press , 1967 ) , 137 , 139 . 17. I first found this quote in Arnold P. Kaminsky , The India Office 1880-1910 ( New York ...

Author: Nupur Chaudhuri

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253207053

Category: Social Science

Page: 294

View: 853

"[Western Women and Imperialism] provides fascinating insights into interactions and attitudes between western and non-western women, mainly in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It is an important contribution to the field of women's studies and (primarily British) imperial history, in that many of the essays explore problems of cross-cultural interaction that have been heretofore ignored." —Nancy Fix Anderson "A challenging anthology in which a multiplicity of authors sheds new light on the waves of missionaries, 'memsahibs,' nurses—and feminists." —Ms. ". . . a long-overdue engagement with colonial discourse and feminism. . . . excellent essays . . ." —The Year's Work in Critical Cultural Theory
Categories: Social Science

Security and Progress

Security and Progress

The English Revolution : British Politics 1880-1939 . London , 1985 . Kaminsky , Arnold P. The India Office 1880-1910 . Westport , Conn . , 1986 . Kilbracken , Lord . Reminiscences of Lord Kilbracken . London , 1931 .

Author: Paul R. Brumpton

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313317526

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 928

Examines the imperial policies of Salisbury and "liberal" notions of empire after the Indian Mutiny.
Categories: History

The British Left and India

The British Left and India

1 Liberal Anti-Imperialism: The Indian National Congress in Britain, 1885–1906 The British regime in India around 1906 is perhaps best characterised as a ... 2 Arnold P. Kaminsky, The India Office, 18801910 (London, 1986), 124–51.

Author: Nicholas Owen

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191528415

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 237

From the formation of the Indian National Congress in 1885 to the winning of independence in 1947, this book traces the complex and often troubled relationship between anti-imperialist campaigners in Britain and in India. Nicholas Owen traces the efforts of British Radicals and socialists to identify forms of anti-imperialism in India which fitted comfortably with their existing beliefs and their sense of how authentic progressive movements were supposed to work. On the other side of the relationship, he charts the trajectory of the Indian National Congress, as it shifted from appeals couched in language familiar to British progressives to the less familiar vocabulary and techniques of Mahatma Gandhi. The new Gandhian methods of self-reliance had unwelcome implications for the work that the British supporters of Congress had traditionally undertaken, leading to the collapse of their main organisation, and the precipitation of anti-imperialist work into the turbulent cross-currents of left-wing British politics. Metropolitan anti-imperialism became largely a function of other commitments, whether communist, theosophical, pacifist, socialist or anti-fascist. Revealing the strengths and weaknesses of these connections, The British Left and India looks at the ultimate failure to create the durable alliance between anti-imperialists which the British Empire's governors had always feared. Drawing on a wide range of newly available archival material in Britain and India, including the records of campaigning organizations, political parties, the British government and the imperial security services, this book is a powerful account of the diverse and fragmented world of British metropolitan anti-imperialism.
Categories: History

Historical Dictionary of the British Empire

Historical Dictionary of the British Empire

The secretary of state directed the manner in which all busi- ness at the India Office * was conducted , although he was ... REFERENCES : Arnold P. Kaminsky , The India Office , 1880-1910 , 1983 ; Stephen E. Koss , John Morley at the ...

Author: James Stuart Olson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313279179

Category: Great Britain

Page: 672

View: 351

Categories: Great Britain

Anglo Indian Attitudes

Anglo Indian Attitudes

4 H.H. Risley, The People ofIndia (2nd edn, London, 1915); O.H.K. Spate, India and Pakistan (London, 1954). 5 A.P. Kaminsky, The India Office, 18801910 (London, 1986). 6 Hilary Ewing, 'The Indian Civil Service, 1919-42' (unpublished ...

Author: Clive Dewey

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780826432544

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 144

In the years between the Indian Mutiny and Independence in 1947 the Indian Civil Service was the most powerful body of officials in the English-speaking world. About 300,000,000 Indians, a sixth of the human race, were ruled by 1000 Civilians. With Whitehall 8000 miles away and the peasantry content with their decisions, they had the freedom to translate ideas into action. This work explores the use they made of their power by examining the beliefs of two middle-ranking Civilians. It shows, in detail, how they put into practice values which they acquired from their parents, their teachers and contemporary currents of opinion. F.L. Brayne and Sir Malcolm Darling reflected the two faces of British imperialism: the urge to assimilate and the desire for rapprochement. Brayne, a born-again Evangelical, despised Indian culture, thought individual Indians were sunk in sin and dedicated his career to making his peasant subjects industrious and thrifty. Darling, a cultivated humanist, despised his compatriots and thought that Indians were sensitive and imaginative. Brayne and Darling personified two ideologies that pervaded the ICS and shaped British rule in India. This work aims to make a contribution to the history of British India and a telling commentary on contemporary values at home.
Categories: History

Dislocating the Orient

Dislocating the Orient

Kaminsky, The India Office, 18801910. L/R/5/1: F. C. Danvers, “Memorandum of a Central Registry Department for the India Office,” March 30, 1878. Paul R. Brumpton, Security and Progress: Lord Salisbury at the India Office (Westport, ...

Author: Daniel Foliard

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226451336

Category: History

Page: 343

View: 498

While the twentieth century’s conflicting visions and exploitation of the Middle East are well documented, the origins of the concept of the Middle East itself have been largely ignored. With Dislocating the Orient, Daniel Foliard tells the story of how the land was brought into being, exploring how maps, knowledge, and blind ignorance all participated in the construction of this imagined region. Foliard vividly illustrates how the British first defined the Middle East as a geopolitical and cartographic region in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries through their imperial maps. Until then, the region had never been clearly distinguished from “the East” or “the Orient.” In the course of their colonial activities, however, the British began to conceive of the Middle East as a separate and distinct part of the world, with consequences that continue to be felt today. As they reimagined boundaries, the British produced, disputed, and finally dramatically transformed the geography of the area—both culturally and physically—over the course of their colonial era. Using a wide variety of primary texts and historical maps to show how the idea of the Middle East came into being, Dislocating the Orient will interest historians of the Middle East, the British empire, cultural geography, and cartography.
Categories: History