The INS on the Line

The INS on the Line

The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954 offers a comprehensive history of the INS in the southwestern borderlands, tracing the ways in which local immigration officials both made and enforced the ...

Author: S. Deborah Kang

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199757435

Category: HISTORY

Page: 282

View: 227

"For much of the twentieth century, Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) officials recognized that the US-Mexico border region was a special case. Here, the INS confronted a set of political, social, and environmental obstacles that prevented it from replicating its achievements at the immigration stations of Angel Island and Ellis Island. In response to these challenges, local INS officials resorted to the law--amending, nullifying, and even rewriting the nation's immigration laws for the borderlands, as well as enforcing them. In The INS on the Line, S. Deborah Kang traces the ways in which the INS on the US-Mexico border made the nation's immigration laws over the course of the twentieth century. While the INS is primarily thought to be a law enforcement agency, Kang demonstrates that the agency also defined itself as a lawmaking body. Through a nuanced examination of the agency's admission, deportation, and enforcement practices in the Southwest, she reveals how local immigration officials constructed a complex approach to border control, one that closed the line in the name of nativism and national security, opened it for the benefit of transnational economic and social concerns, and redefined it as a vast legal jurisdiction for the policing of undocumented immigrants. Despite its contingent and local origins, this composite approach to border control, Kang concludes, continues to inform the daily operations of the nation's immigration agencies, American immigration law and policy, and conceptions of this border today"--
Categories: HISTORY

The President and Immigration Law

The President and Immigration Law

See Immigration Act of 1924, Pub. L. No. 68-139, 43 Stat. 153. 16. S. Deborah Kang, The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the U.S.- Mexico Border, 19171954, at 23–24 (2016) (noting that “the Bureau of Immigration began to ...

Author: Adam Cox

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190694371

Category: Law

Page:

View: 99

Who controls American immigration policy? The biggest immigration controversies of the last decade have all involved policies produced by the President policies such as President Obama's decision to protect Dreamers from deportation and President Trump's proclamation banning immigrants from several majority-Muslim nations. While critics of these policies have been separated by a vast ideological chasm, their broadsides have embodied the same widely shared belief: that Congress, not the President, ought to dictate who may come to the United States and who will be forced to leave. This belief is a myth. In The President and Immigration Law, Adam B. Cox and Cristina M. Rodríguez chronicle the untold story of how, over the course of two centuries, the President became our immigration policymaker-in-chief. Diving deep into the history of American immigration policy from founding-era disputes over deporting sympathizers with France to contemporary debates about asylum-seekers at the Southern border they show how migration crises, real or imagined, have empowered presidents. Far more importantly, they also uncover how the Executive's ordinary power to decide when to enforce the law, and against whom, has become an extraordinarily powerful vehicle for making immigration policy. This pathbreaking account helps us understand how the United States ?has come to run an enormous shadow immigration system-one in which nearly half of all noncitizens in the country are living in violation of the law. It also provides a blueprint for reform, one that accepts rather than laments the role the President plays in shaping the national community, while also outlining strategies to curb the abuse of law enforcement authority in immigration and beyond.
Categories: Law

Border Policing

Border Policing

A History of Enforcement and Evasion in North America Holly M. Karibo, George T. Díaz ... 2011); and Deborah S. Kang, The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the U.S.-Mexico Border, 19171954 (New York: Oxford University Press, ...

Author: Holly M. Karibo

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9781477320679

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 790

An extensive history examining how North American nations have tried (and often failed) to police their borders, Border Policing presents diverse scholarly perspectives on attempts to regulate people and goods at borders, as well as on the ways that individuals and communities have navigated, contested, and evaded such regulation. The contributors explore these power dynamics though a series of case studies on subjects ranging from competing allegiances at the northeastern border during the War of 1812 to struggles over Indian sovereignty and from the effects of the Mexican Revolution to the experiences of smugglers along the Rio Grande during Prohibition. Later chapters stretch into the twenty-first century and consider immigration enforcement, drug trafficking, and representations of border policing in reality television. Together, the contributors explore the powerful ways in which federal authorities impose political agendas on borderlands and how local border residents and regions interact with, and push back against, such agendas. With its rich mix of political, legal, social, and cultural history, this collection provides new insights into the distinct realities that have shaped the international borders of North America.
Categories: History

The U S Mexico Border A Reference Handbook

The U S  Mexico Border  A Reference Handbook

Threshold: Emergency Responders on the U.S.-Mexico Border. Berkeley: University of California Press. Kang, S. Deborah. 2017. The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border. 19171954. New York: Oxford University ...

Author: Michael C. LeMay

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440874802

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 734

Comprising seven chapters, The U.S.-Mexico Border: A Reference Handbook surveys the complex topic for students and readers. Chapter 1 discusses the political, social, and economic contexts in which the border came to exist. Chapter 2 discusses problems, controversies, and proposed solutions. Chapter 3 consists of original essays contributed by outside scholars, complementing the perspective and expertise of the author. Chapter 4 profiles major organizations and people who, as stakeholders in border politics, drive the agenda on the issue. Chapter 5 presents data and documents on the topic, giving readers the ability to analyze the facts. Chapter 6 provides additional resources that the reader may wish to consult, such as books, journal articles, and films. Chapter 7 provides a detailed chronology of important events, and the book closes with a useful glossary of key terms used throughout the book and a comprehensive subject index.
Categories: History

Border Towns and Border Crossings A History of the U S Mexico Divide

Border Towns and Border Crossings  A History of the U S  Mexico Divide

“A Border, a Bus, and Then School Begins in New Mexico. ... Pancho Villa and Black Jack Pershing: The Punitive Expedition in Mexico. ... The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the U.S.Mexican Border, 19171954.

Author: Roger Bruns

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440863530

Category: Social Science

Page: 285

View: 207

This is a compelling and revealing look at the history of the U.S.-Mexican border as a place and symbol of cross-cultural melding and a source of growing anxiety over immigration and national security. Explores the creation and development of the border in the late 19th century and the growing industrialization of the region in the early 20th century Examines the cross-border violence during the US Civil War and the Mexican Revolution, the increasing racial hostility and deportation policies in the 1930s and 1950s, and cartel violence Provides an unbiased assessment of the advent of the Chicano movement and politics on the border, NAFTA and border economics, and the increasingly hostile political debate over immigration and demands for a wall Provides critical background and contextual information to the events that have led to a turning point in America: How do we as a nation treat those seeking a new life at the border? Shows how the border has brought out feelings of community and acceptance along the border and at the same time birthed nativist and racial stereotypes Supplements political material with relatable information about the lives of cross-border workers and the blending of cultures along the border as they include food, language, and art
Categories: Social Science

Voices of the Border

Voices of the Border

Testimonios of Migration, Deportation, and Asylum Tobin Hansen, María Engracia Robles Robles. Kang, S. Deborah. The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the U.S.- Mexico Border, 19171954. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017.

Author: Tobin Hansen

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 9781647120849

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 306

Powerful personal accounts from migrants crossing the US-Mexico border provide an understanding of their experiences, as well as the consequences of public policy Migrants, refugees, and deportees live through harrowing situations, yet their personal stories are often ignored. While politicians and commentators mischaracterize and demonize, herald border crises, and speculate about who people are and how they live, the actual memories of migrants are rarely shared. In the tradition of oral storytelling, Voices of the Border reproduces the stories migrants have told, offering a window onto both individual and shared experiences of crossing the US-Mexico border. This collection emerged from interviews conducted by the Kino Border Initiative (KBI), a Jesuit organization that provides humanitarian assistance and advocates for migrants. Based in Nogales, Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora--twin border cities connected by shared histories, geographies, economies, and cultures--the editors and their colleagues documented migrants' testimonios to amplify their voices. These personal narratives of lived experiences, presented in the original Spanish with English translations, bring us closer to these individuals' strength, love, and courage in the face of hardship and injustice. Short introductions written by migrant advocates, humanitarian workers, religious leaders, and scholars provide additional context at the beginning of each chapter. These powerful stories help readers better understand migrants' experiences, as well as the consequences of public policy for their community. Royalties from the sale of the book go to the Kino Border Initiative.
Categories: Political Science

Porous Borders

Porous Borders

Revolution in Texas: How a Forgotten Rebellion and Its Bloody Suppression Turned Mexicans into Americans. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003. ... The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the U.S.-Mexico Border, 19171954.

Author: Julian Lim

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469635507

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 559

With the railroad's arrival in the late nineteenth century, immigrants of all colors rushed to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, transforming the region into a booming international hub of economic and human activity. Following the stream of Mexican, Chinese, and African American migration, Julian Lim presents a fresh study of the multiracial intersections of the borderlands, where diverse peoples crossed multiple boundaries in search of new economic opportunities and social relations. However, as these migrants came together in ways that blurred and confounded elite expectations of racial order, both the United States and Mexico resorted to increasingly exclusionary immigration policies in order to make the multiracial populations of the borderlands less visible within the body politic, and to remove them from the boundaries of national identity altogether. Using a variety of English- and Spanish-language primary sources from both sides of the border, Lim reveals how a borderlands region that has traditionally been defined by Mexican-Anglo relations was in fact shaped by a diverse population that came together dynamically through work and play, in the streets and in homes, through war and marriage, and in the very act of crossing the border.
Categories: Social Science

Border Land Border Water

Border Land  Border Water

The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 19171954. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Katz, Friedrich. “The Liberal Republic and the Porfiriato, 1867–1910.” In Mexico since Independence, ...

Author: C. J. Alvarez

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9781477319031

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 773

From the boundary surveys of the 1850s to the ever-expanding fences and highway networks of the twenty-first century, Border Land, Border Water examines the history of the construction projects that have shaped the region where the United States and Mexico meet. Tracing the accretion of ports of entry, boundary markers, transportation networks, fences and barriers, surveillance infrastructure, and dams and other river engineering projects, C. J. Alvarez advances a broad chronological narrative that captures the full life cycle of border building. He explains how initial groundbreaking in the nineteenth century transitioned to unbridled faith in the capacity to control the movement of people, goods, and water through the use of physical structures. By the 1960s, however, the built environment of the border began to display increasingly obvious systemic flaws. More often than not, Alvarez shows, federal agencies in both countries responded with more construction—“compensatory building” designed to mitigate unsustainable policies relating to immigration, black markets, and the natural world. Border Land, Border Water reframes our understanding of how the border has come to look and function as it does and is essential to current debates about the future of the US-Mexico divide.
Categories: History

The Trump Presidency

The Trump Presidency

Up Against the Wall: Re-Imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border. ... The Mexican Border: Immigration, War and a Trillion Dollars in Trade. ... The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the U.S.Mexico Border, 19171954.

Author: Mara Oliva

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319963259

Category: Political Science

Page: 258

View: 177

This edited collection delves into the key aspects of the Trump campaign promises around immigration, trade, social and foreign policy, and unpicks how the first year of the presidency has played out in delivering them. It charts his first year from both historical and contemporary political standpoints, and in the context of comparative pieces stacking Trump’s performance against Gold-standard presidents such as Reagan, Kennedy and the last ‘outsider’, Eisenhower. Focusing in on a number of key elements of the presidency in depth, it offers a unique perspective on a presidency like no other, drawing on the overriding themes of populism, nativist nationalism and the battle for disengagement from the neoliberal power generation.
Categories: Political Science

Bootlegged Aliens

Bootlegged Aliens

... Militarizing the Border: When Mexicans Became the Enemy (College Station: Texas A&M Press, 2012); S. Deborah Kang, The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 19171954 (New York: Oxford University Press, ...

Author: Ashley Johnson Bavery

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812297379

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 505

In contemporary discourse, much of the discussion of U.S. border politics focuses on the Southwest. In Bootlegged Aliens, however, Ashley Johnson Bavery considers the North as a borderlands region, demonstrating how this often-overlooked border influenced government policies toward illegal immigration, business and labor union practices around migrant labor, and the experience of being an illegal immigrant in early twentieth-century industrial America. Bavery examines how immigrants, politicians, and employers helped shape national policies toward noncitizen laborers. In the process, she uncovers the northern industrial origins of an exploitative system that emerged on America's border with Canada, whose legacy remains central to debates about America's borders today. Bavery begins in the 1920s to explore how that decade's immigration restrictions launched an era of policing and profiling that excluded America's foreign born from the benefits of citizenship. On the border between Detroit and Windsor, Canada, this process turned certain Europeans into undocumented immigrants, a group the press and policymakers referred to as bootlegged aliens. Over the next decade, deportation and policing practices stigmatized entire communities of ethnic Europeans regardless of their legal status. Moreover, restrictive laws allowed manufacturers to exploit workers in new ways. By the Great Depression, citizenship had become an invisible boundary that excluded hundreds of thousands of laborers from New Deal entitlements. Accepted wisdom suggests that the 1924 Immigration Act had allowed ethnic Europeans to shed ties to their homelands and assimilate into the "melting pot" of American culture by the 1930s. Bavery challenges this perspective, finding that, instead of forging a common culture with their fellow workers, European immigrants coming through Canada to Detroit faced statewide registration drives, exclusion from key labor unions, and disqualification from the Works Progress Administration, the cornerstone of America's nascent welfare state. In the heart of industrial America, Bootlegged Aliens reveals, citizenship was highly contingent.
Categories: History