The Language of Empire

The Language of Empire

His host was something of a scholar of the Lomongo language ; Wallace took notes on local beliefs and customs , picked up a few Congolese words , and got an ...

Author: Robert H. MacDonald

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719037492

Category: English literature

Page: 268

View: 452

The author defines the role of discourse in determining this perception of reality - looking at the construction of Empire through the huge body of popular texts ranging from fiction, poetry and children's stories to history and biography. This study will appeal to readers interested in British imperialism, those engaging in literature and cultural studies as well as to specialists in colonial history.
Categories: English literature

The Language of Empire

The Language of Empire

Rome and the Idea of Empire from the Third Century BC to the Second Century AD John Richardson. with two passages relating to the Roman state rather than ...

Author: John Richardson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521815017

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 425

This book seeks to discover what the Romans themselves thought about their empire by examining the changing meaning of key terms.
Categories: History

Empires of the Word

Empires of the Word

Geographic and persons treatment.

Author: Nicholas Ostler

Publisher: HarperPerennial

ISBN: 0007118716

Category: Historical linguistics

Page: 615

View: 571

Geographic and persons treatment.
Categories: Historical linguistics

Law Language and Empire in the Roman Tradition

Law  Language  and Empire in the Roman Tradition

Democracy, Empire and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens. Cambridge, mass. ... “imperium romanum: Empire and the language Bibliography 159.

Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812204889

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 860

The Romans depicted the civil law as a body of rules crafted through communal deliberation for the purpose of self-government. Yet, as Clifford Ando demonstrates in Law, Language, and Empire in the Roman Tradition, the civil law was also an instrument of empire: many of its most characteristic features developed in response to the challenges posed when the legal system of Rome was deployed to embrace, incorporate, and govern people and cultures far afield. Ando studies the processes through which lawyers at Rome grappled with the legal pluralism resulting from imperial conquests. He focuses primarily on the tools—most prominently analogy and fiction—used to extend the system and enable it to regulate the lives of persons far from the minds of the original legislators, and he traces the central place that philosophy of language came to occupy in Roman legal thought. In the second part of the book Ando examines the relationship between civil, public, and international law. Despite the prominence accorded public and international law in legal theory, it was civil law that provided conceptual resources to those other fields in the Roman tradition. Ultimately it was the civil law's implication in systems of domination outside its own narrow sphere that opened the door to its own subversion. When political turmoil at Rome upended the institutions of political and legislative authority and effectively ended Roman democracy, the concepts and language that the civil law supplied to the project of Republican empire saw their meanings transformed. As a result, forms of domination once exercised by Romans over others were inscribed in the workings of law at Rome, henceforth to be exercised by the Romans over themselves.
Categories: History

The Language of Empire

The Language of Empire

This 2008 book seeks to discover what the Romans themselves thought about their empire by examining the changing meaning of key terms.

Author: John Richardson

Publisher:

ISBN: 0511465335

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 165

This 2008 book seeks to discover what the Romans themselves thought about their empire by examining the changing meaning of key terms.
Categories: History

Empire of Language

Empire of Language

In Empire of Language, Laurent Dubreuil explores the power-language phenomenon in the context of European and, particularly, French colonialism and its aftermath.

Author: Laurent Dubreuil

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801467516

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 963

The relationship between power and language has been a central theme in critical theory for decades now, yet there is still much to be learned about the sheer force of language in the world in which we live. In Empire of Language, Laurent Dubreuil explores the power-language phenomenon in the context of European and, particularly, French colonialism and its aftermath. Through readings of the colonial experience, he isolates a phraseology based on possession, in terms of both appropriation and haunting, that has persisted throughout the centuries. Not only is this phraseology a legacy of the past, it is still active today, especially in literary renderings of the colonial experience-but also, and more paradoxically, in anticolonial discourse. This phrase shaped the teaching of European languages in the (former) empires, and it tried to configure the usage of those idioms by the "Indigenes." Then, scholarly disciplines have to completely reconsider their discursive strategies about the colonial, if, at least, they attempt to speak up. Dubreuil ranges widely in terms of time and space, from the ancien régime through the twentieth century, from Paris to Haiti to Quebec, from the Renaissance to the riots in the banlieues. He examines diverse texts, from political speeches, legal documents, and colonial treatises to anthropological essays, poems of the Négritude, and contemporary rap, ever attuned to the linguistic strategies that undergird colonial power. Equally conversant in both postcolonial criticism and poststructuralist scholarship on language, but also deeply grounded in the sociohistorical context of the colonies, Dubreuil sets forth the conditions for an authentically postcolonial scholarship, one that acknowledges the difficulty of getting beyond a colonialism-and still maintains the need for an afterward.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Language of Empire

The Language of Empire

The revelations since April 2004 of systematic torture and sexual humiliation of Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib have not easily been assimilated into the mythology of the U.S. “war on terror.” The Language of Empire focuses on the ...

Author: Lila Rajiva

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015062900793

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 831

Under the rule of Saddam Hussein, the prison of Abu Ghraib (the Father of the Raven) was a place of ill omen, notorious for horrific suffering and torture and mass executions. After the invasion of Iraq, the U.S. military made Abu Ghraib one of the major detention centers for Iraqis suspected of sympathizing with the resistance. The revelations since April 2004 of systematic torture and sexual humiliation of Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib have not easily been assimilated into the mythology of the U.S. “war on terror.” The Language of Empire focuses on the response to these revelations in the U.S. media, in congress, and in the larger context of U.S. global politics and ideology. Its focus on the media is a prelude to showing how the language of multiculturalism, humanitarianism, and even feminism have been hijacked in the cause of an illegal and brutal imperialist war. The media have colluded with the Bush administration in manipulating images of the U.S. occupation of Iraq in such a way as to present it as a clash between civilization and barbarism, and in selectively using legal and procedural issues to distract from the basic criminality of the invasion itself. The circuitous logic through which U.S. imperialism presents itself as a defender of legality and democracy is exposed for all to see in this important and timely work.
Categories: Political Science

Language Empires in Comparative Perspective

Language Empires in Comparative Perspective

The authors who contributed to this volume concur as to the applicability of the notion of empire to language-related issues.

Author: Christel Stolz

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 311040818X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 391

View: 143

The articles gathered in Language Empires in Comparative Perspective address language spread and subsequent marginalization of minority languages, language endangerment and revitalization, contact-induced language change, and identity issues, with an emphasis on the dominance of non-Western languages, namely Arabic, Chinese, and Russian.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Empire of Words

Empire of Words

Anyone who is fascinated with words and language will find Willinsky's tour through the OED a delightful and stimulating experience. No one who reads this book will ever feel quite the same about Murray's web of words.

Author: John Willinsky

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400821358

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 755

What is the meaning of a word? Most readers turn to the dictionary for authoritative meanings and correct usage. But what is the source of authority in dictionaries? Some dictionaries employ panels of experts to fix meaning and prescribe usage, others rely on derivation through etymology. But perhaps no other dictionary has done more to standardize the English language than the formidable twenty-volume Oxford English Dictionary in its 1989 second edition. Yet this most Victorian of modern dictionaries derives its meaning by citing the earliest known usage of words and by demonstrating shades of meaning through an awesome database of over five million examples of usage in context. In this fascinating study, John Willinsky challenges the authority of this imperial dictionary, revealing many of its inherent prejudices and questioning the assumptions of its ongoing revision. "Clearly, the OED is no simple record of the language `as she is spoke,'" Willinsky writes. "It is a selective representation reflecting certain elusive ideas about the nature of the English language and people. Empire of Words reveals, by statistic and table, incident and anecdote, how serendipitous, judgmental, and telling a task editing a dictionary such as the OED can be." Willinsky analyzes the favored citation records from the three editorial periods of the OED's compilation: the Victorian, imperial first edition; the modern supplement; and the contemporary second edition composed on an electronic database. He reveals shifts in linguistic authority: the original edition relied on English literature and, surprisingly, on translations, reference works, and journalism; the modern editions have shifted emphasis to American sources and periodicals while continuing to neglect women, workers, and other English-speaking countries. Willinsky's dissection of dictionary entries exposes contradictions and ambiguities in the move from citation to definition. He points out that Shakespeare, the most frequently cited authority in the OED, often confounds the dictionary's simple sense of meaning with his wit and artfulness. He shows us how the most famous four-letter words in the language found their way through a belabored editorial process, sweating and grunting, into the supplement to the OED. Willinsky sheds considerable light on how the OED continues to shape the English language through the sometimes idiosyncratic, often biased selection of citations by hired readers and impassioned friends of the language. Anyone who is fascinated with words and language will find Willinsky's tour through the OED a delightful and stimulating experience. No one who reads this book will ever feel quite the same about Murray's web of words.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Language

Language

... Empire . Ch . 4 , ' The languages of the eastern slopes ' , discusses the
languages of the eastern foothills of the Andes and the Upper Amazon basin ,
territories found in Ecuador , Peru , and Bolivia and which include the Bolivian ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:49015003458610

Category: Comparative linguistics

Page:

View: 555

Categories: Comparative linguistics

Language Empires in Comparative Perspective

Language Empires in Comparative Perspective

Or the promotion of the Arabic language as a factor in the “recovery” of the ... empire. to. a. language. of. domination. Arabic shares with French and ...

Author: Christel Stolz

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110408478

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 404

View: 298

The notion of empire is associated with economic and political mechanisms of dominance. For the last decades, however, there has been a lively debate concerning the question whether this concept can be transferred to the field of linguistics, specifically to research on situations of language spread on the one hand and concomitant marginalization of minority languages on the other. The authors who contributed to this volume concur as to the applicability of the notion of empire to language-related issues. They address the processes, potential merits and drawbacks of language spread as well as the marginalization of minority languages, language endangerment and revitalization, contact-induced language change, the emergence of mixed languages, and identity issues. An emphasis is on the dominance of non-Western languages such as Arabic, Chinese, and, particularly, Russian. The studies demonstrate that the emergence, spread and decline of language empires is a promising area of research, particularly from a comparative perspective.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Grammar of Empire in Eighteenth Century British Writing

The Grammar of Empire in Eighteenth Century British Writing

The book demonstrates the ambivalence at the heart of British linguistic identity, moving from a close analysis of Scottish writers Alexander MacDonald, Adam Smith, Hugh Blair, and Tobias Smollett to a revised understanding of the language ...

Author: Janet Sorensen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521021553

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 332

View: 312

This study explores the complex role of language as an instrument of empire in eighteenth-century British literature. Focusing on the relationship between England and one of its "Celtic colonies," Scotland, Janet Sorensen examines how the expansion of the British empire influenced the formation of a national standard English. The book demonstrates the ambivalence at the heart of British linguistic identity, moving from a close analysis of Scottish writers Alexander MacDonald, Adam Smith, Hugh Blair, and Tobias Smollett to a revised understanding of the language use of Samuel Johnson and Jane Austen.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Empire of Political Thought

Empire of Political Thought

A book about how European colonists in Australia represented the Indigenous peoples they found there, and the tasks of governing them within the terms of Western political thought.

Author: Bruce Buchan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317314646

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 756

A book about how European colonists in Australia represented the Indigenous peoples they found there, and the tasks of governing them within the terms of Western political thought. It emphasises how the framework of ideas drawn from the traditions of Western political thought was employed in the imperial government of Indigenous peoples.
Categories: Political Science

Language Diversity in the Late Habsburg Empire

Language Diversity in the Late Habsburg Empire

What comes out of this exploration of military views on the use of languages in the empire is that language acquisition was a must for these officers, ...

Author: Markian Prokopovych

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004407978

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 284

View: 629

This collective volume seeks to approach the practice of language diversity in multi-ethnic urban societies of Austria-Hungary and place it both within its local and its larger European context, and within the broader studies of multilingualism and multiculturalism.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Jefferson s Empire

Jefferson s Empire

Peter S. Onuf's new book traces Jefferson's vision of theAmerican future to its roots in his idealized notions of nationhood and empire.Onuf's unsettling recognition that Jefferson's famed egalitarianism was elaboratedin an imperial context ...

Author: Peter S. Onuf

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813922046

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 250

View: 582

Thomas Jefferson believed that the American revolution was atransformative moment in the history of political civilization. He hoped that hisown efforts as a founding statesman and theorist would help construct a progressiveand enlightened order for the new American nation that would be a model andinspiration for the world. Peter S. Onuf's new book traces Jefferson's vision of theAmerican future to its roots in his idealized notions of nationhood and empire.Onuf's unsettling recognition that Jefferson's famed egalitarianism was elaboratedin an imperial context yields strikingly original interpretations of our nationalidentity and our ideas of race, of westward expansion and the Civil War, and ofAmerican global dominance in the twentiethcentury. Jefferson's vision of an American "empirefor liberty" was modeled on a British prototype. But as a consensual union ofself-governing republics without a metropolis, Jefferson's American empire would befree of exploitation by a corrupt imperial ruling class. It would avoid the cycle ofwar and destruction that had characterized the European balance ofpower. The Civil War cast in high relief thetragic limitations of Jefferson's political vision. After the Union victory, as thereconstructed nation-state developed into a world power, dreams of the United Statesas an ever-expanding empire of peacefully coexisting states quickly faded frommemory. Yet even as the antebellum federal union disintegrated, a Jeffersoniannationalism, proudly conscious of America's historic revolution against imperialdomination, grew up in its place. In Onuf's view, Jefferson's quest to define a new American identity also shaped his ambivalentconceptions of slavery and Native American rights. His revolutionary fervor led himto see Indians as "merciless savages" who ravaged the frontiers at the Britishking's direction, but when those frontiers were pacified, a more benevolentJefferson encouraged these same Indians to embrace republican values. AfricanAmerican slaves, by contrast, constituted an unassimilable captive nation, unjustlywrenched from its African homeland. His great panacea: colonization. Jefferson's ideas about race revealthe limitations of his conception of American nationhood. Yet, as Onuf strikinglydocuments, Jefferson's vision of a republican empire--a regime of peace, prosperity, and union without coercion--continues to define and expand the boundaries ofAmerican national identity.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Race Empire and English Language Teaching

Race  Empire  and English Language Teaching

WORKING IN CONCERT: EMPIRE, RACE, AND LANGUAGE IDEOLOGIES In the schools of the study, the various institutional and social arrangements ...

Author: Suhanthie Motha

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 9780807755129

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 184

View: 224

This timely book takes a critical look at the teaching of English, showing how language is used to create hierarchies of cultural privilege in public schools across the country. Motha closely examines the work of four ESL teachers who developed anti-racist pedagogical practices during their first year of teaching. Their experiences, and those of their students, provide a compelling account of how new teachers might gain agency for culturally responsive teaching in spite of school cultures that often discourage such approaches. The author combines current research with her original analyses to shed light on real classroom situations faced by teachers of linguistically diverse populations. This book will help pre- and in-service teachers to think about such challenges as differential achievement between language learners and "native-speakers;" about hierarchies of languages and language varieties; about the difference between an accent identity and an incorrect pronunciation; and about the use of students' first languages in English classes. This resource offers implications for classroom teaching, educational policy, school leadership, and teacher preparation, including reflection questions at the end of each chapter.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Globish How English Became the World s Language

Globish  How English Became the World s Language

In this provocative new look at the course of empire, Robert McCrum shows how the language of the Anglo-American imperium has become the world’s lingua franca. In the twenty-first century, writes the author, English + Microsoft = Globish.

Author: Robert McCrum

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393080926

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 331

View: 284

“A fascinating study not only of the roots and growth of our own language but of its future.”—Bloomsbury Review It seems impossible: a small island in the North Atlantic, colonized by Rome, then pillaged for hundreds of years by marauding neighbors, becomes the dominant world power in the nineteenth century. In this provocative new look at the course of empire, Robert McCrum shows how the language of the Anglo-American imperium has become the world’s lingua franca. In the twenty-first century, writes the author, English + Microsoft = Globish.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines