The Life of Beatrice of Nazareth 1200 1268

The Life of Beatrice of Nazareth  1200 1268

Her own Seven Manieren van Minne is incorporated into the text and given in translation from two redactions: the Latin of her biographer and her own vernacular.

Author: Roger de Ganck

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015021868362

Category: Religion

Page: 416

View: 250

The life and mystical experiences of an intelligent and artistic thirteenth-century Flemish nun are described in this contemporary biography, drawn from a lost autobiography. Her own Seven Manieren van Minne is incorporated into the text and given in translation from two redactions: the Latin of her biographer and her own vernacular.
Categories: Religion

Women Writing Back Writing Women Back

Women Writing Back   Writing Women Back

detail in her Life by Thomas de Cantimpré, stayed for nine years with the anchoress Yvette of Huy (1158–1228).35 Yvette's ... Ida of Nivelles developed a close friendship with Beatrice of Nazareth at the Cistercian community of La Ramée ...

Author: Anke Gilleir

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004184633

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 400

View: 968

Privileging both a transnational and a sociological approach, this volume explores the position of women in the early modern literary field, emphasising the international scope of their literature and examining their historical position, influence, network and dialogues.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Writings of Medieval Women

The Writings of Medieval Women

Cited by Roger De Ganck, from the Collectio de scandalis ecclesiae, in The Life of Beatrice of Nazareth: Part One, pp. xxx-xxxi. On the beguines, see Roger De Ganck, Beatrice of Nazareth in Her Context: Part Two (Kalamazoo, Michigan, ...

Author: Marcelle Thiebaux

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429618987

Category: History

Page: 536

View: 526

Published in 1994: The period surveyed in this anthology extends from the eve of Christianity's triumph, in the third century, to the new age of expansion in the fifteenth century, an age marked by the advent of printing pressed, the European discovery of the Caribbean islands, which Columbus called the Indies, the relentless stripping of medieval altars by Church reformists, and perhaps a diminution of female autonomy.
Categories: History

Women and Gender in Medieval Europe

Women and Gender in Medieval Europe

the Cistercian cloister of Nazareth, at Lier in the vicinity of Antwerp, where she had been prioress since 1237. According to a Latin biography, Vita Beatricis (The Life of Beatrice), written after her death by an anonymous cleric, ...

Author: Margaret Schaus

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415969444

Category: History

Page: 986

View: 448

Publisher description
Categories: History

The Stigmata in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

The Stigmata in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

234, ll. 60/2: Et amoris perfossa iaculo, vulnus inflictum occultare nequiverit quod in interioribus, sola teste conscientia, [toleravit].' * I have slightly modified the translation provided in The Life of Beatrice of Nazareth, bk.

Author: Carolyn Muessig

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192515148

Category: Religion

Page: 264

View: 820

Francis of Assisi's reported reception of the stigmata on Mount La Verna in 1224 is almost universally considered to be the first documented account of an individual miraculously and physically receiving the five wounds of Christ. The early thirteenth-century appearance of this miracle, however, is not as unexpected as it first seems. Interpretations of Galatians 6:17—I bear the marks of the Lord Jesus Christ in my body—had been circulating since the early Middle Ages in biblical commentaries. These works perceived those with the stigmata as metaphorical representations of martyrs bearing the marks of persecution in order to spread the teaching of Christ in the face of resistance. By the seventh century, the meaning of Galatians 6:17 had been appropriated by bishops and priests as a sign or mark of Christ that they received invisibly at their ordination. Priests and bishops came to be compared to soldiers of Christ, who bore the brand (stigmata) of God on their bodies, just like Roman soldiers who were branded with the name of their emperor. By the early twelfth century, crusaders were said to bear the actual marks of the passion in death and even sometimes as they entered into battle. The Stigmata in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe traces the birth and evolution of religious stigmata and particularly of stigmatic theology, as understood through the ensemble of theological discussions and devotional practices. Carolyn Muessig assesses the role stigmatics played in medieval and early modern religious culture, and the way their contemporaries reacted to them. The period studied covers the dominant discourse of stigmatic theology: that is, from Peter Damian's eleventh-century theological writings to 1630 when the papacy officially recognised the authenticity of Catherine of Siena's stigmata.
Categories: Religion

Medieval Women on Sin and Salvation

Medieval Women on Sin and Salvation

Hadewijch of Antwerp, Beatrice of Nazareth, Margaret Ebner, and Julian of Norwich Mary Lou Shea ... She echoed Anselm's assertion that Christ's life served as an example of one who did his duty , helping the weak to be strong and ...

Author: Mary Lou Shea

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 1433109484

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 375

Hadewijch of Antwerp (c.1200?-1240), Beatrice of Nazareth (1200-1268), Margaret Ebner (1291-1351), and Julian of Norwich (1343-1416/19) are best known for their mystical experiences and literary styles. Medieval Women on Sin and Salvation explores the reality that these women understood their encounters in primarily theological categories. It is well documented that Anselm of Canterbury's 1098 Cur Deus Homo was quickly and widely adopted by late medieval religious men. Given the deeply relational, somewhat unconventional, yet clearly orthodox interpretations of Anselm's theory expressed by Hadewijch, Beatrice, Margaret, and Julian, it would seem that nuns, beguines, and devout lay women were compelled by the same understanding of Atonement as the priests, monks, brothers, and lay men of the era. Unable to offer academic theological treatises, given the constraints of their age, these women managed to convey, through their writings, profoundly theological insights into the crucial Christian concepts of the natures of soul and sin, the Fall, and the Incarnation and its benefits, both for God and for humanity. This book offers valuable new insights and is suitable for upper division undergraduate classes and graduate courses in the history of Christianity/Medieval Christianity, theology, spirituality, and women's studies.
Categories: History

The Mystic Mind

The Mystic Mind

I, The Life ofBeatrice ofNazareth; Vol. II, Beatrice of Nazareth in her Context; Vol. III, Towards Unification with God, Kalamazoo, MI, Cistercian Publications, 1991. De Ganck, Life ofBeatrice, Bk. I, Ch. 8. 3 See John H. Lynch, ...

Author: Jerome Kroll

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134297689

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 606

Drawing on a database of over 1400 medieval holy persons and in-depth studies of individual saints, this collaboration between a medieval historian and a professor of psychiatry applies modern biological and psychological research to the lives of medieval mystics and ascetics.
Categories: History

Intimate Reading

Intimate Reading

The Life of Beatrice of Nazareth provides a striking example of how hagiographers shape their spiritual material. Its author includes a translation of Beatrice's own Seven Ways of Loving God in his hagiography." In translating that text ...

Author: Jessica Barr

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472131693

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 647

Intimate Reading: Textual Encounters in Medieval Women’s Visions and Vitae explores the ways that women mystics sought to make their books into vehicles for the reader’s spiritual transformation. Jessica Barr argues that the cognitive work of reading these texts was meant to stimulate intensely personal responses, and that the very materiality of the book can produce an intimate encounter with God. She thus explores the differences between mystics’ biographies and their self-presentation, analyzing as well the complex rhetorical moves that medieval women writers employ to render their accounts more effective. This new volume is structured around five case studies. Chapters consider the biographies of 13th-century holy women from Liège, the writings of Margery Kempe, Gertrude of Helfta, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Marguerite Porete, and Julian of Norwich. At the heart of Intimate Reading is the question of how reading works—what it means to enter imaginatively and intellectually into the words of another. The volume showcases the complexity of medieval understandings of the work of reading, deepening our perception of the written word’s capacity to signify something that lies even beyond rational comprehension.
Categories: History

The Writings of Medieval Women

The Writings of Medieval Women

Cited by Roger De Ganck, from the Collectio de scandalis ecclesiae, in The Life of Beatrice of Nazareth: Part One, pp. xxx–xxxi. On the beguines, see Roger De Ganck, Beatrice of Nazareth in Her Context: Part Two (Kalamazoo, Michigan, ...

Author: Marcelle Theibaux

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135507855

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 564

View: 689

"Royal and saintly women are well-represented here, with the welcome addition of women from the Mediterranean arc...Garland has done a solid job of presenting this book." -- Arthuriana "The Anthology gives a fine sense of the great range of women's writing in the Middle Ages." -- Medium Aevum
Categories: Literary Criticism

A History of Women Philosophers

A History of Women Philosophers

CORNELIA WOLFSKEEL I. BIOGRAPHY Beatrice ( Beatrijs ) was born in Tienen 1 in a well to do family at the ... The author of Beatrice's Life obtained his materials from the sisters of Nazareth , particularly from sister Christina .

Author: M.E. Waithe

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9024735718

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 814

aspirations, the rise of western monasticism was the most note worthy event of the early centuries. The importance of monasteries cannot be overstressed as sources of spirituality, learning and auto nomy in the intensely masculinized, militarized feudal period. Drawing their members from the highest levels of society, women's monasteries provided an outlet for the energy and ambition of strong-willed women, as well as positions of considerable authority. Even from periods relatively inhospitable to learning of all kinds, the memory has been preserved of a good number of women of education. Their often considerable achievements and influence, however, generally lie outside even an expanded definition of philo sophy. Among the most notable foremothers of this early period were several whose efforts signal the possibility of later philosophical work. Radegund, in the sixth century, established one of the first Frankish convents, thereby laying the foundations for women's spiritual and intellectual development. From these beginnings, women's monasteries increased rapidly in both number and in fluence both on the continent and in Anglo-Saxon England. Hilda (d. 680) is well known as the powerful abbsess of the double monastery of Whitby. She was eager for knowledge, and five Eng lish bishops were educated under her tutelage. She is also accounted the patron of Caedmon, the first Anglo-Saxon poet of religious verse. The Anglo-Saxon nun Lioba was versed in the liberal arts as well as Scripture and canon law.
Categories: History