The Making of the Modern Refugee

The Making of the Modern Refugee

This title offers a comprehensive history of global population displacement in the 20th century, and provides a new analytic approach to the subject by exploring its causes, consequences and meanings.

Author: Peter Gatrell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198744471

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 599

The Making of the Modern Refugee is a comprehensive history of global population displacement in the twentieth century. It takes a new approach to the subject, exploring its causes, consequences, and meanings. History, the author shows, provides important clues to understanding how the idea of refugees as a 'problem' embedded itself in the minds of policy-makers and the public, and poses a series of fundamental questions about the nature of enforced migration and how it has shaped society throughout the twentieth century across a broad geographical area - from Europe and the Middle East to South Asia, South-East Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. Wars, revolutions, and state formation are invoked as the main causal explanations of displacement, and are considered alongside the emergence of a twentieth-century refugee regime linking governmental practices, professional expertise, and humanitarian relief efforts. This new study rests upon scholarship from several disciplines and draws extensively upon oral testimony, eye-witness accounts, and film, as well as unpublished source material in the archives of governments, international organisations, and non-governmental organisations. The Making of the Modern Refugee explores the significance that refugees attached to the places they left behind, to their journeys, and to their destinations - in short, how refugees helped to interpret and fashion their own history.
Categories: History

The Making of the Modern Refugee

The Making of the Modern Refugee

Civil wars fuelled by external intervention created perfect conditions for manufacturing refugees. In Rwanda the refugee crisis had complex origins that can be traced back at least a generation prior to the genocide in 1994 (chapters 7 ...

Author: Peter Gatrell

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191655692

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 420

The Making of the Modern Refugee is a comprehensive history of global population displacement in the twentieth century. It takes a new approach to the subject, exploring its causes, consequences, and meanings. History, the author shows, provides important clues to understanding how the idea of refugees as a 'problem' embedded itself in the minds of policy-makers and the public, and poses a series of fundamental questions about the nature of enforced migration and how it has shaped society throughout the twentieth century across a broad geographical area - from Europe and the Middle East to South Asia, South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Wars, revolutions, and state formation are invoked as the main causal explanations of displacement, and are considered alongside the emergence of a twentieth-century refugee regime linking governmental practices, professional expertise, and humanitarian relief efforts. This new study rests upon scholarship from several disciplines and draws extensively upon oral testimony, eye-witness accounts, and film, as well as unpublished source material in the archives of governments, international organisations, and non-governmental organisations. The Making of the Modern Refugee explores the significance that refugees attached to the places they left behind, to their journeys, and to their destinations - in short, how refugees helped to interpret and fashion their own history.
Categories: History

The Making of the Modern Refugee

The Making of the Modern Refugee

This title offers a comprehensive history of global population displacement in the 20th century, and provides a new analytic approach to the subject by exploring its causes, consequences and meanings.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191752169

Category:

Page:

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Understanding and Teaching the Modern Middle East

Understanding and Teaching the Modern Middle East

Inevitably decisions reflected not the wishes of UNHCR, but the interests of member states, each of which affirmed its sovereignty in respect of decisions over asylum.” Gatrell, Making of the Modern Refugee, 200. 61.

Author: Omnia El Shakry

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299327606

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 116

Many students learn about the Middle East through a sprinkling of information and generalizations deriving largely from media treatments of current events. This scattershot approach can propagate bias and misconceptions that inhibit students’ abilities to examine this vitally important part of the world. Understanding and Teaching the Modern Middle East moves away from the Orientalist frameworks that have dominated the West’s understanding of the region, offering a range of fresh interpretations and approaches for teachers. The volume brings together experts on the rich intellectual, cultural, social, and political history of the Middle East, providing necessary historical context to familiarize teachers with the latest scholarship. Each chapter includes easy- to-explore sources to supplement any curriculum, focusing on valuable and controversial themes that may prove pedagogically challenging, including colonization and decolonization, the 1979 Iranian revolution, and the US-led “war on terror.” By presenting multiple viewpoints, the book will function as a springboard for instructors hoping to encourage students to negotiate the various contradictions in historical study.
Categories: History

Making Refugees in India

Making Refugees in India

The so - called ' third world only came to be included in the international refugee regime in the 1960s and 1970s.86 Even more recent histories of the development of 86 84 Gatrell , The Making of the Modern Refugee , 1-19 .

Author: Ria Kapoor

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192855459

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 567

Offering a global history of India's refugee regime, Making Refugees in India explores how one of the first postcolonial states during the mid-twentieth century wave of decolonisation rewrote global practices surrounding refugees - signified by India's refusal to sign the 1951 UN Refugee Convention. In broadening the scope of this decision well beyond the Partition of India, starting with the so called 'Wilsonian moment' and extending to the 1970s, the refugee is placed within the postcolonial effort to address the inequalities of the subject-citizenship of the British empire through the fullest realisation of self-determination. India's 'strategically ambiguous' approach to refugees is thus far from ad hoc, revealing a startling consistency when viewed in conversation of postcolonial state building and anti-imperial worldmaking to address inequity across the former colonies. The anti-colonial cry for self-determination as the source of all rights, it is revealed in this work, was in tension with the universal human rights that focused on the individual, and the figure of the refugee felt this irreconcilable difference most intensely. To elucidate this, this work explores contrasts in Indians' and Europeans' rights in the British empire and in World War Two, refugee rehabilitation during Partition, the arrival of the Tibetan refugees, and the East Pakistani refugee crisis. Ria Kapoor finds that the refugee was constitutive of postcolonial Indian citizenship, and that assistance permitted to refugees - a share of the rights guaranteed by self-determination - depended on their potential to threaten or support national sovereignty that allowed Indian experiences to be included in the shaping of universal principles.
Categories: History

Refugees in Europe 1919 1959

Refugees in Europe  1919 1959

Gatrell, The Making of the Modern Refugee, 283. Peter Gatrell, Free World? The Campaign to Save the World's Refugees, 1956-1963 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 9. Sheila Rowbotham, Hidden from History: 300 Years of ...

Author: Matthew Frank

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472585639

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 978

Refugees in Europe, 1919-1959 offers a new history of Europe's mid-20th century as seen through its recurrent refugee crises. By bringing together in one volume recent research on a range of different contexts of groups of refugees and refugee policy, it sheds light on the common assumptions that underpinned the history of refugees throughout the period under review. The essays foreground the period between the end of the First World War, which inaugurated a series of new international structures to deal with displaced populations, and the late 1950s, when Europe's home-grown refugee problems had supposedly been 'solved' and attention shifted from the identification of an exclusively European refugee problem to a global one. Borrowing from E. H. Carr's The Twenty Years' Crisis, first published in 1939, the editors of this volume test the idea that the two post-war eras could be represented as a single crisis of a European-dominated international order of nation states in the face of successive refugee crises which were both the direct consequence of that system and a challenge to it. Each of the chapters reflects on the utility and limitations of this notion of a 'forty years' crisis' for understanding the development of specific national and international responses to refugees in the mid-20th century. Contributors to the volume also provide alternative readings of the history of an international refugee regime, in which the non-European and colonial world are assigned a central role in the narrative.
Categories: History

The Unsettling of Europe

The Unsettling of Europe

This is a landmark book on a subject that, decade by decade, will always haunt Europe. 'Peter Gatrell has produced a tour de force .

Author: Peter Gatrell

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141984803

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 750

WINNER OF THE LAURA SHANNON PRIZE 2021 SHORTLISTED FOR THE LIONEL GELBER PRIZE 2020 A TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019 Migrants have stood at the heart of modern Europe's experience, whether trying to escape danger, to find a better life or as a result of deliberate policy, whether moving from the countryside to the city, or between countries, or from outside the continent altogether. Peter Gatrell's powerful new book is the first to bring these stories together into one place. He creates a compelling narrative bracketed by two nightmarish periods: the great convulsions following the fall of the Third Reich and the mass attempts in the 2010s by migrants to cross the Mediterranean into Europe. The Unsettling of Europe is a new history of the continent, charting the ever-changing arguments about the desirability or otherwise of migrants and their central role in Europe's post-1945 prosperity. Gatrell is as fascinating on the giant movements of millions (such as the epic waves of German migration) to that of much smaller groups, such as the Karelians, Armenians, Moluccans or Ugandan Asians. Above all he has written a book that makes the reader deeply aware of the many extraordinary journeys taken by countless individuals in pursuit of work, safety and dignity, all the time. This is a landmark book on a subject that, decade by decade, will always haunt Europe. 'Peter Gatrell has produced a tour de force ... This important and timely work on one of the most challenging issues in modern Europe deserves to be widely read' Ian Kershaw
Categories: Social Science

People Forced to Flee

People Forced to Flee

History, Change and Challenge Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees ... 152 Gatrell estimates 300,000 refugees fled to France alone by October 1937 in: The Making of the Modern Refugee, p. 73.

Author: Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198786450

Category: Political Science

Page: 540

View: 393

There are today some 60 million people who have fled their homes because of persecution and conflict. This is the highest number ever recorded. These people suffer exile that will likely last for years and even whole lifetimes-both present and future. The unprecedented scale and duration of forced displacement provide unsettling points of departure for the 2016 edition of The State of the World's Refugees. Covering the years since 2012, this volume is the seventh in a series of flagship publications by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees ('UNHCR'). This book draws upon expert analysis as well as UNHCR's direct experience to shed light on the root causes and consequences of the current humanitarian and development crisis. Its eleven chapters examine the world's evolving efforts to finance, plan, and implement basic human rights protections amidst a recent spate of complex emergencies. Updated data, maps, and case studies examine persistent challenges such as limited access to asylum abroad, protection gaps at home for internally displaced persons, the devastating consequences of statelessness, and the troubling elusiveness of durable solutions. This book also highlights the widespread impact of climate change as well as innovations in how humanitarian operations are designed and conducted. Over 65 years after UNHCR was established, A World in Turmoil reveals why its work remains more relevant and urgent than ever.
Categories: Political Science

Immigration

Immigration

Peter Gatrell, The Making of the Modern Refugee (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), 182. 21. Gatrell, The Making of the Modern Refugee, 182–183. 22. Gatrell, The Making of the Modern Refugee, 186. 23. Gatrell, The Making of the ...

Author: Carl J. Bon Tempo

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300226867

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 146

A sweeping narrative history of American immigration from the colonial period to the present "A masterly historical synthesis, full of wonderful detail and beautifully written, that brings fresh insights to the story of how immigrants were drawn to and settled in America over the centuries."--Nancy Foner, author of One Quarter of the Nation The history of the United States has been shaped by immigration. Historians Carl J. Bon Tempo and Hasia R. Diner provide a sweeping historical narrative told through the lives and words of the quite ordinary people who did nothing less than make the nation. Drawn from stories spanning the colonial period to the present, Bon Tempo and Diner detail the experiences of people from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. They explore the many themes of American immigration scholarship, including the contexts and motivations for migration, settlement patterns, work, family, racism, and nativism, against the background of immigration law and policy. Taking a global approach that considers economic and personal factors in both the sending and receiving societies, the authors pay close attention to how immigration has been shaped by the state response to its promises and challenges.
Categories: History

Asylum Policy Boat People and Political Discourse

Asylum Policy  Boat People and Political Discourse

Boats, Votes and Asylum in Australia and Italy Irial Glynn ... exceptions stand out: Peter Gatrell's The Making of the Modern Refugee and Phil Orchard's A Right to Flee.14 Gatrell focuses mostly on the reasons people have fled their ...

Author: Irial Glynn

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137517333

Category: Political Science

Page: 218

View: 497

This book compares the policies of Australia and Italy towards boat people who have arrived in the two countries since the early 1990s. While the regular and varied inflow of immigrants arriving at national airports, ferry terminals and train stations is seldom witnessed by the public, the arrival of boat people is often played out in the media and consequently attracts disproportionate political and public attention. Both Australia and Italy faced similar dilemmas, but the nature of political debate on the issue, the types of strategies introduced, and the effects that policy changes had on boat people diverged considerably. This book argues that contrasting migration path dependencies, disparate political values within the Left, and varying international obligations best explain the different approaches taken by the two countries to boat people.
Categories: Political Science