The Metamorphoses of Myth in Fiction since 1960

The Metamorphoses of Myth in Fiction since 1960

Why do contemporary writers use myths from ancient Greece and Rome, Pharaonic Egypt, the Viking north, Africa's west coast, and Hebrew and Christian traditions? What do these stories from premodern cultures have to offer us?

Author: Kathryn Hume

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501359880

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 267

Why do contemporary writers use myths from ancient Greece and Rome, Pharaonic Egypt, the Viking north, Africa's west coast, and Hebrew and Christian traditions? What do these stories from premodern cultures have to offer us? The Metamorphoses of Myth in Fiction since 1960 examines how myth has shaped writings by Kathy Acker, Margaret Atwood, William S. Burroughs, A. S. Byatt, Neil Gaiman, Norman Mailer, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon, Kurt Vonnegut, Jeanette Winterson, and others, and contrasts such canonical texts with fantasy, speculative fiction, post-singularity fiction, pornography, horror, and graphic narratives. These artistic practices produce a feeling of meaning that doesn't need to be defined in scientific or materialist terms. Myth provides a sense of rightness, a recognition of matching a pattern, a feeling of something missing, a feeling of connection. It not only allows poetic density but also manipulates our moral judgments, or at least stimulates us to exercise them. Working across genres, populations, and critical perspectives, Kathryn Hume elicits an understanding of the current uses of mythology in fiction.
Categories: Social Science

The Heroine with 1001 Faces

The Heroine with 1001 Faces

“Within the literary context, mythologies are ongoing and developing, even evolving,” as Kathryn Hume puts it in The Metamorphoses of Myth in Fiction since 1960 (New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020), 6. 12. Stephen Larsen and Robin ...

Author: Maria Tatar

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 9781631498824

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 450

World-renowned folklorist Maria Tatar reveals an astonishing but long buried history of heroines, taking us from Cassandra and Scheherazade to Nancy Drew and Wonder Woman. The Heroine with 1,001 Faces dismantles the cult of warrior heroes, revealing a secret history of heroinism at the very heart of our collective cultural imagination. Maria Tatar, a leading authority on fairy tales and folklore, explores how heroines, rarely wielding a sword and often deprived of a pen, have flown beneath the radar even as they have been bent on redemptive missions. Deploying the domestic crafts and using words as weapons, they have found ways to survive assaults and rescue others from harm, all while repairing the fraying edges in the fabric of their social worlds. Like the tongueless Philomela, who spins the tale of her rape into a tapestry, or Arachne, who portrays the misdeeds of the gods, they have discovered instruments for securing fairness in the storytelling circles where so-called women’s work—spinning, mending, and weaving—is carried out. Tatar challenges the canonical models of heroism in Joseph Campbell’s The Hero with a Thousand Faces, with their male-centric emphases on achieving glory and immortality. Finding the women missing from his account and defining their own heroic trajectories is no easy task, for Campbell created the playbook for Hollywood directors. Audiences around the world have willingly surrendered to the lure of quest narratives and charismatic heroes. Whether in the form of Frodo, Luke Skywalker, or Harry Potter, Campbell’s archetypical hero has dominated more than the box office. In a broad-ranging volume that moves with ease from the local to the global, Tatar demonstrates how our new heroines wear their curiosity as a badge of honor rather than a mark of shame, and how their “mischief making” evidences compassion and concern. From Bluebeard’s wife to Nancy Drew, and from Jane Eyre to Janie Crawford, women have long crafted stories to broadcast offenses in the pursuit of social justice. Girls, too, have now precociously stepped up to the plate, with Hermione Granger, Katniss Everdeen, and Starr Carter as trickster figures enacting their own forms of extrajudicial justice. Their quests may not take the traditional form of a “hero’s journey,” but they reveal the value of courage, defiance, and, above all, care. “By turns dazzling and chilling” (Ruth Franklin), The Heroine with 1,001 Faces creates a luminous arc that takes us from ancient times to the present day. It casts an unusually wide net, expanding the canon and thinking capaciously in global terms, breaking down the boundaries of genre, and displaying a sovereign command of cultural context. This, then, is a historic volume that informs our present and its newfound investment in empathy and social justice like no other work of recent cultural history.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Beyond Suspicion

Beyond Suspicion

New American Fiction Since 1960 Marc Chenetier, Ch&. myth that imaginarily prolongs the Second World War ) , metamorphoses like these declare themselves to be programmatic in a title such as Once Upon a Droshky , which refers to a ...

Author: Marc Chenetier

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812230590

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 321

View: 680

"Covers everything from Salinger, Nabokov, Kerouac, and Burroughs to the first hints of cyberpunkishness."--American Book Review
Categories: Literary Criticism

Worlds Apart

Worlds Apart

Sutherland , J. A. “ American Science Fiction since 1960. " In Science Fiction : A ... Metamorphoses of Science Fiction : On the Poetics and History of a Literary Genre . ... Science , Myth , and the Fictional Creation of Alien Worlds .

Author: Carl Darryl Malmgren

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253336457

Category: Fiction

Page: 208

View: 160

"[Malmgren] succeeds in formulating a typology of science fiction that will become a standard reference for some years to come."Â —Choice "... the most intelligently organized and effectively argued general study of SF that I have ever read."Â —Rob Latham, SFRA Review "... required reading for its evenhanded overview of so much of the previous critical/theoretical material devoted to science fiction." —American Book Review Worlds Apart provides a comprehensive theoretical model for science fiction by examining the worlds of science fiction and the discourse which inscribes them. Malmgren identifies the basic science fiction types, including alien encounters, alternate societies and worlds, and fantasy, and examines the role of the reader in concretizing and interpreting these science fiction worlds.
Categories: Fiction

Ovid s Myth of Pygmalion on Screen

Ovid s Myth of Pygmalion on Screen

It is too big a paradigmatic shift from the classical world and Ovid's myth to scrutinize robots when they appear as a species and as an everyday part of a fictional dystopian world. Of course, robots en masse and as a genus in science ...

Author: Paula James

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781441184665

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 541

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Categories: History

The Metamorphosis

The Metamorphosis

London: Bowen & Bowen, 1960. ... Angress, Ruth K. “Kafka and SacherMasoch: A Note on The Metamorphosis. ... Metamorphosis: Transformations of the Body and the Influence of Ovid's 'Metamorphoses' on Germanic Literature of the Nineteenth ...

Author: Franz Kafka

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393523140

Category:

Page:

View: 221

Categories:

The Monomyth in American Science Fiction Films

The Monomyth in American Science Fiction Films

Already abstracted from numerous mythological,religious, andfantastic sources, the monomythhasalso been repeatedly ... andStar WarsEpisode VI: Return ofthe Jedi(1983)—these films include TheTime Machine (1960), Logan'sRun (1976) ...

Author: Donald E. Palumbo

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476618517

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 807

One of the great intellectual achievements of the 20th century, Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces is an elaborate articulation of the monomyth: the narrative pattern underlying countless stories from the most ancient myths and legends to the films and television series of today. The monomyth's fundamental storyline, in Campbell's words, sees "the hero venture forth from the world of the common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons to his fellow man." Campbell asserted that the hero is each of us--thus the monomyth's endurance as a compelling plot structure. This study examines the monomyth in the context of Campbell's The Hero and discusses the use of this versatile narrative in 26 films and two television shows produced between 1960 and 2009, including the initial Star Wars trilogy (1977-1983), The Time Machine (1960), Logan's Run (1976), Escape from New York (1981), Tron (1982), The Terminator (1984), The Matrix (1999), the first 11 Star Trek films (1979-2009), and the Sci Fi Channel's miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune (2000) and Frank Herbert's Children of Dune (2003).
Categories: Literary Criticism

Jack Lewis and His American Cousin Nat Hawthorne

Jack Lewis and His American Cousin  Nat Hawthorne

(Lewis marked this passage in his copy of the novel.) ... Lewis's novel, subtitled A Myth retold, is Lewis's retelling of the story of cupid and Psyche from the Metamorphoses or The Golden ... Ibid., Letter of 26 August 1960, III, 1181.

Author: D. G. Kehl

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781610978361

Category: Religion

Page: 248

View: 593

When he was a student at Oxford University, C. S. Lewis wrote to a friend expressing his great admiration of and enthusiasm for the novels of Nathaniel Hawthorne, particularly The House of the Seven Gables and Transformation (British title of The Marble Faun). This study examines the parallels between these two kindred spirits and their works, focusing on their similar worldviews, their personal backgrounds and lifestyles, and the "Ultimates" they both pondered. It discusses common themes in their works, such as myth, scientism, and "the great power of blackness." Their respective attitudes toward these issues and others, such as faith, repentance, heaven and hell, confession, church attendance, the clergy, and Puritanism are strikingly similar. Considerable attention is given to "companion pieces" of the two writers, with discussion of the so-called "Fortunate Fall" in The Marble Faun and Perelandra, veil imagery in "The Minister's Black Veil," The Blithedale Romance, and Till We Have Faces, influence of Bunyan's allegory on The Pilgrim's Regress and "The Celestial Railroad," and multiform love in The Four Loves and The House of the Seven Gables. Examination of such affinities between these two writers and their works provides mutual illumination and enhanced appreciation of each.
Categories: Religion

The Metamorphosis International Student Edition Norton Critical Editions

The Metamorphosis  International Student Edition   Norton Critical Editions

London: Bowen & Bowen, 1960. ... Angress, Ruth K. “Kafka and SacherMasoch: A Note on The Metamorphosis. ... Metamorphosis: Transformations of the Body and the Influence of Ovid's 'Metamorphoses' on Germanic Literature of the Nineteenth ...

Author: Franz Kafka

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393614770

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 296

Franz Kafka's 1915 novella of nightmarish transformation became a worldwide classic and remains a century later one of the most widely read works of fiction in the world. This new and acclaimed translation is accompanied by possible inspirations and critical analysis of Gregor Samsa's strange story. This Norton Critical Edition includes: · Susan Bernofsky’s acclaimed new translation, along with her Translator’s Note. · Introductory materials and explanatory footnotes by Mark M. Anderson. · Three illustrations. · Related texts by Kafka, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Rainer Maria Rilke, among others. · Eight critical essays by Günther Anders, Walter H. Sokel, Nina Pelikan Straus, Mark M. Anderson, Elizabeth Boa, Carolin Duttlinger, Kári Driscoll, and Dan Miron. · A Chronology and a Selected Bibliography.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Metamorphoses of Helen

Metamorphoses of Helen

“ ' Truth tired with iteration ' : Myth and Fiction in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida , ” PQ , 66 ( 1987 ) , 153–74 . ... 1955 , 1960 by Richmond Lattimore ) ; the University of South Carolina Press for permission to quote from The ...

Author: Mihoko Suzuki

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801480809

Category: Fiction

Page: 271

View: 598

Mihoko Suzuki sheds light on a literary tradition that seemingly holds Helen of Troy and her descendants responsible for causing epic conflicts, while it appropriates the woman's perspective as a source of insight and poetic power."A superb study of the uses and abuses of female characters in the epic tradition and their complex, sympathetic treatment by male poets."—Choice
Categories: Fiction