The Moral Economy of the Peasant

The Moral Economy of the Peasant

I think the central thesis is correct and compelling.”—Clifford Geertz “In this major work, … Scott views peasants as political and moral actors defending their values as well as their individual security, making his book vital to ...

Author: James C. Scott

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300021905

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 254

View: 584

James C. Scott places the critical problem of the peasant household—subsistence—at the center of this study. The fear of food shortages, he argues persuasively, explains many otherwise puzzling technical, social, and moral arrangements in peasant society, such as resistance to innovation, the desire to own land even at some cost in terms of income, relationships with other people, and relationships with institutions, including the state. Once the centrality of the subsistence problem is recognized, its effects on notions of economic and political justice can also be seen. Scott draws from the history of agrarian society in lower Burma and Vietnam to show how the transformations of the colonial era systematically violated the peasants’ “moral economy” and created a situation of potential rebellion and revolution. Demonstrating keen insights into the behavior of people in other cultures and a rare ability to generalize soundly from case studies, Scott offers a different perspective on peasant behavior that will be of interest particularly to political scientists, anthropologists, sociologists, and Southeast Asianists. “The book is extraordinarily original and valuable and will have a very broad appeal. I think the central thesis is correct and compelling.”—Clifford Geertz “In this major work, … Scott views peasants as political and moral actors defending their values as well as their individual security, making his book vital to an understanding of peasant politics.”—Library Journal
Categories: Business & Economics

Malay Laborers

Malay Laborers

Author: Zahid Emby

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:959754193

Category: Malays

Page:

View: 583

Categories: Malays

The Rational Peasant

The Rational Peasant

Popkin develops a model of rational peasant behavior and shows how village procedures result from the self-interested interactions of peasants.

Author: Samuel L. Popkin

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520035615

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 244

Popkin develops a model of rational peasant behavior and shows how village procedures result from the self-interested interactions of peasants. This political economy view of peasant behavior stands in contrast to the model of a distinctive peasant moral economy in which the village community is primarily responsible for ensuring the welfare of its members.
Categories: History

Global Crises And Social Movements

Global Crises And Social Movements

This book takes the innovative step of linking social movements to international political and economic crises, identifying the general features of industrial and developing societies that predispose them toward social movements of ...

Author: Stanley Hoffmann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429718458

Category: History

Page:

View: 761

Categories: History

The Moral Economy of the Peasant

The Moral Economy of the Peasant

I have argued that starting with the peasant's existential dilemma — his need for crisis subsistence insurance — we ... to their short run profit, to increasingly violate the moral economy of the peasantry and become more exploitative.

Author: James C. Scott

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300185553

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 254

View: 592

James C. Scott places the critical problem of the peasant household—subsistence—at the center of this study. The fear of food shortages, he argues persuasively, explains many otherwise puzzling technical, social, and moral arrangements in peasant society, such as resistance to innovation, the desire to own land even at some cost in terms of income, relationships with other people, and relationships with institutions, including the state. Once the centrality of the subsistence problem is recognized, its effects on notions of economic and political justice can also be seen. Scott draws from the history of agrarian society in lower Burma and Vietnam to show how the transformations of the colonial era systematically violated the peasants’ “moral economy” and created a situation of potential rebellion and revolution. Demonstrating keen insights into the behavior of people in other cultures and a rare ability to generalize soundly from case studies, Scott offers a different perspective on peasant behavior that will be of interest particularly to political scientists, anthropologists, sociologists, and Southeast Asianists. “The book is extraordinarily original and valuable and will have a very broad appeal. I think the central thesis is correct and compelling.”—Clifford Geertz “In this major work, … Scott views peasants as political and moral actors defending their values as well as their individual security, making his book vital to an understanding of peasant politics.”—Library Journal James C. Scott is professor of political science at Yale University.
Categories: Business & Economics

Moral Economy and the Middle Peasant

Moral Economy and the Middle Peasant

This thesis examines how people mobilize around notions of distributive justice, or "moral economies," to make claims to resources, using the process of postsocialist land privatization in the Mekong Delta region of southern Vietnam as a ...

Author: Timothy Michael Gorman

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:858133191

Category:

Page: 94

View: 479

This thesis examines how people mobilize around notions of distributive justice, or "moral economies," to make claims to resources, using the process of postsocialist land privatization in the Mekong Delta region of southern Vietnam as a case study. First, I argue that the region's history of settlement, production, and political struggle helped to entrench certain normative beliefs around land ownership, most notably in its population of middle peasants. I then detail the ways in which these middle peasants mobilized around notions of distributive justice to successfully press demands for land restitution in the late 1980s, drawing on Vietnamese newspapers and other sources to construct case studies of local land conflicts. Finally, I argue that the successful mobilization of middle peasants around such a moral economy has helped, over the past two decades, to facilitate the re-emergence of agrarian capitalism in the Mekong Delta, in contrast to other regions in Vietnam.
Categories: