Mississippi Black History Makers

Mississippi Black History Makers

Ibid.; Wharton, The Negro in Mississippi, 1865-1890, 146-49. 8. Harris, “James Lynch: Black Leader in Southern Reconstruction," 44-45. 9. Ibid., 44. 10. Ibid., 45; Wharton, The Negro in Mississippi, 1865-1890, 261-62. 11.

Author: George Alexander Sewell

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781617034282

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 288

This new edition of biographical sketches of notable blacks from Mississippi expands the edition published in 1977. A total of 166 figures are included in this new printing, all of them persons who have, by the authors' comprehensive survey, made significant contributions in bringing about the uplift of the black race.Black history makers are defined herein as those who have achieved national prominence in their fields, have made lasting contributions within the state as pioneers in fields where blacks were not previously allowed, or contributed in their own community or field, representing the lives of many blacks and serving as role models of what can be accomplished. Each of those included in the book either was born in Mississippi and spent a part of his or her childhood there or migrated to Mississippi and remained.Seventy-five history makers have been added to those in the first edition which included Hiram R. Revels, the first black U.S. Senator; Blanche K. Bruce, the first black U.S. Senator to serve a six-year term; political and civil rights leaders such as Aaron Henry, Medgar Evers, and Fannie Lou Hamer; and contributors to arts and letters such as Leontyne Price, William Grant Still, Margaret Walker Alexander, and James Earl Jones; and many others./ Among those included in this new edition of Mississippi Black History Makers are William Johnson, a free black from antebellum Natchez; Margaret Murray Washington, wife of Booker T. Washington; Bo Diddley McDaniel, a pioneer rock-and-roll musician; Walter Payton, running back for the Chicago Bears; and other notable black Mississippians.Information about many contemporary figures who appeared in the first edition has been updated, and the book has been reorganized in ten thematic sections: politics, civil rights, business, education, performing and visual arts, journalism and literature, military, science/medicine/social work, sports, and religion. Each section is introduced with an historical overview of this field in Mississippi, written by Margaret Dwight.This book is a valuable reference work for those wishing to assess the contributions of blacks to the history of Mississippi. Of particular significance is the fact that it is a collection which brings attention to lesser known figures as well as those of considerable renown.
Categories: History

The Negro in Mississippi 1865 1890

The Negro in Mississippi  1865 1890

Slavery in the ante-bellum south has received intensive studies in general and special works.

Author: Vernon Lane Wharton

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015063077245

Category: African Americans

Page: 342

View: 901

Slavery in the ante-bellum south has received intensive studies in general and special works. The Civil War brought a violent and comparatively sudden destruction to this social order. The end of the Confederacy, the beginnings of Reconstruction, and the legal abolition of slavery did not immediately bring into existence the system which now prevails. It brought instead a period of instability and uncertainty in which new problems had to be face by all races. Vestigial remains of slavery are apparent in the current system, but there is reason to believe that changes in race relations can lead to intentional chances guided by far-sighted leaders.
Categories: African Americans

Emancipation

Emancipation

Letter to author from Sue Gordon , clerk , Mississippi Supreme Court , Nov. 10 , 1987 . 182. V. L. Wharton , The Negro in Mississippi , 18651890 , at 173 ( 1947 ) . According to a letter from Donald M. Love , secretary of Oberlin ...

Author: J. Clay Smith, Jr

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812216857

Category: Law

Page: 764

View: 916

"Emancipation is the first truly comprehensive reference book covering the first one hundred years of African Americans in the legal profession. Other legal historians and biographers must take Smith's work as a starting point for gauging the impact Black lawyers and institutions have had upon the evolution of the American legal profession."--Black Issues in Higher Education "The sheer quantity of information contained in Emancipation is overwhelming; the impact of page after page of data, stories and lives, and the thousands of detailed, extensive footnotes and documentation is simply overpowering. It is a monumental achievement."--Southern University Law Review "A remarkable piece of scholarship. . . . Emancipation contains a wealth of information previously unknown even to those who consider themselves well-informed about African-American history. . . . It will, I am sure, serve as the definitive authority on the history of black lawyers for years to come."--St. Louis Post-Dispatch "Emancipation is an important and impressive work; one cannot read it without being inspired by the legal acumen, creativity, and resiliency these pioneer lawyers displayed. . . . It should be read by everyone interested in understanding the road African-Americans have traveled and the challenges that lie ahead."--From the Foreword by Justice Thurgood Marshall J. Clay Smith, Jr., is Professor of Law and formerly Dean at the Howard University School of Law. He has served as President of the Washington Bar Association and as National President of the Federal Bar Association. He was appointed U.S. Commissioner of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by President Jimmy Carter and later served as Acting Chairman under President Ronald Reagan. He is the author of Rebels in Law: Voices in History of Black Women Lawyers.
Categories: Law

Mississippi Zion

Mississippi Zion

African Mississippian citizenship conflicted with white Mississippian's post–Civil War political agenda. ... The Negro in Mississippi 18651890, 202–3; Walton, Black Republicans, 15; Beatty, Revolution Gone Backward, 47. 4.

Author: Evan Howard Ashford

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496839749

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 296

From lesser-known state figures to the ancestors of Oprah Winfrey, Morgan Freeman, and James Meredith, Mississippi Zion: The Struggle for Liberation in Attala County, 1865–1915 brings the voices and experiences of everyday people to the forefront and reveals a history dictated by people rather than eras. Author Evan Howard Ashford, a native of the county, examines how African Americans in Attala County, after the Civil War, shaped economic and social politics as a nonmajority racial group. At the same time, Ashford provides a broader view of Black life occurring throughout the state during the same period. By examining southern African American life mainly through Reconstruction and the civil rights movement, historians have long mischaracterized African Americans in Mississippi by linking their empowerment and progression solely to periods of federal assistance. This book shatters that model and reframes the postslavery era as a Liberation Era to examine how African Americans pursued land, labor, education, politics, community building, and progressive race relations to position themselves as societal equals. Ashford salvages Attala County from this historical misconception to give Mississippi a new history. He examines African Americans as autonomous citizens whose liberation agenda paralleled and intersected the vicious redemption agenda, and he shows the struggle between Black and white citizens for societal control. Mississippi Zion provides a fresh examination into the impact of Black politics on creating the anti-Black apparatuses that grounded the state’s infamous Jim Crow society. The use of photographs provides an accurate aesthetic of rural African Americans and their connection to the historical moment. This in-depth perspective captures the spectrum of African American experiences that contradict and refine how historians write, analyze, and interpret southern African American life in the post-slavery era.
Categories: History

Hattiesburg

Hattiesburg

... Dark Journey, 41; “The Mississippi State Constitutional Convention,” Baltimore Sun, August 15, 1890, 2; “The Mississippi Convention,” Washington Post, August 29, 1890, 4; and Wharton, The Negro in Mississippi, 18651890, 199–215.

Author: William Sturkey

Publisher: Belknap Press

ISBN: 9780674976351

Category: African Americans

Page: 457

View: 644

In this rich multigenerational saga of race and family in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, William Sturkey reveals the personal stories behind the men and women who struggled to uphold their southern "way of life" against the threat of desegregation, and those who fought to tear it down in the name of justice and racial equality.--
Categories: African Americans

Games of Property

Games of Property

The Forest Register newspaper is referenced in studies of Reconstruction in Mississippi; see for example, Wharton, The Negro in Mississippi, 18651890, 108, 183, 237. 76 Plessy v Ferguson, at 559,562 (Harlan, J., dissenting).

Author: Thadious M. Davis

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822384458

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 539

In Games of Property, distinguished critic Thadious M. Davis provides a dazzling new interpretation of William Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses. Davis argues that in its unrelenting attention to issues related to the ownership of land and people, Go Down, Moses ranks among Faulkner’s finest and most accomplished works. Bringing together law, social history, game theory, and feminist critiques, she shows that the book is unified by games—fox hunting, gambling with cards and dice, racing—and, like the law, games are rule-dependent forms of social control and commentary. She illuminates the dual focus in Go Down, Moses on property and ownership on the one hand and on masculine sport and social ritual on the other. Games of Property is a masterful contribution to understandings of Faulkner’s fiction and the power and scope of property law.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Origins of the New South Fifty Years Later

 Origins of the New South  Fifty Years Later

... Vernon L. Wharton , " The Negro in Missis- sippi , 1865-1890 " ( Ph.D. dissertation , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , 1940 ) , published as The Negro in Mississippi , 18651890 ( Chapel Hill , 1947 ) ; Paul Lewinson ...

Author: John B. Boles

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807129208

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 608

In this thoughtful, sophisticated book, John B. Boles and Bethany L. Johnson piece together the intricate story of historian C. Vann Woodward’s 1951 masterpiece, Origins of the New South, 1877–1913, published as Volume IX of LSU Press’s venerable series A History of the South. Sixteen reviews and articles by prominent southern historians of the past fifty years here offer close consideration of the creation, reception, and enduring influence of that classic work of history. It is rare for an academic book to dominate its field half a century later as Woodward’s Origins does southern history. Although its explanations are not accepted by all, the volume remains the starting point for every work examining the South in the era between Reconstruction and World War I. In writing Origins, Woodward deliberately set out to subvert much of the historical orthodoxy he had been taught during the 1930s, and he expected to be lambasted. But the revisionist movement was already afoot among white southern historians by 1951 and the book was hailed. Woodward’s work had an enormous interpretative impact on the historical academy and encapsulated the new trend of historiography of the American South, an approach that guided both black and white scholars through the civil rights movement and beyond. This easily accessible collection comprises four reviews of Origins from 1952 to 1978; “Origin of Origins,” a chapter from Woodward’s 1986 book Thinking Back: The Perils of Writing History that explains and reconsiders the context in which Origins was written; five articles from a fiftieth anniversary retrospective symposium on Origins; and three commentaries presented at the symposium and here published for the first time. A combination of trenchant commentary and recent reflections on Woodward’s seminal study along with insight into Woodward as a teacher and scholar, Fifty Years Later in effect traces the creation and development of the modern field of southern history.
Categories: History

Dark Journey

Dark Journey

Dunbar Rowland , A Mississippi View of Race Relations in the South ( Jackson , 1903 ) , 16 . 3. ... 1965 ) ; Vernon Lane Wharton , The Negro in Mississippi , 1865- 1890 , James Sprunt Studies in History and Political Science , vol .

Author: Neil R. McMillen

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025206156X

Category: Social Science

Page: 468

View: 878

"Remarkable for its relentless truth-telling, and the depth and thoroughness of its investigation, for the freshness of its sources, and for the shock power of its findings. Even a reader who is not unfamiliar with the sources and literature of the subject can be jolted by its impact."--C. Vann Woodward, New York Review of Books "Dark Journey is a superb piece of scholarship, a book that all students of southern and African-American history will find valuable and informative."--David J. Garrow, Georgia Historical Quarterly
Categories: Social Science

The Free State of Jones

The Free State of Jones

29, 1865), RG 47, vol. 88, MDAH. 14. Bond, Political Culture in the Nineteenth-Century South, 156–61; William C. Harris, Presidential Reconstruction, 51–54, 259–60, 371–405; Vernon Wharton, The Negro in Mississippi, 18651890 (1947; ...

Author: Victoria E. Bynum

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807875247

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 501

Between late 1863 and mid-1864, an armed band of Confederate deserters battled Confederate cavalry in the Piney Woods region of Jones County, Mississippi. Calling themselves the Knight Company after their captain, Newton Knight, they set up headquarters in the swamps of the Leaf River, where, legend has it, they declared the Free State of Jones. The story of the Jones County rebellion is well known among Mississippians, and debate over whether the county actually seceded from the state during the war has smoldered for more than a century. Adding further controversy to the legend is the story of Newt Knight's interracial romance with his wartime accomplice, Rachel, a slave. From their relationship there developed a mixed-race community that endured long after the Civil War had ended, and the ambiguous racial identity of their descendants confounded the rules of segregated Mississippi well into the twentieth century. Victoria Bynum traces the origins and legacy of the Jones County uprising from the American Revolution to the modern civil rights movement. In bridging the gap between the legendary and the real Free State of Jones, she shows how the legend--what was told, what was embellished, and what was left out--reveals a great deal about the South's transition from slavery to segregation; the racial, gender, and class politics of the period; and the contingent nature of history and memory.
Categories: History

The Free State of Jones Movie Edition

The Free State of Jones  Movie Edition

29, 1865), RG 47, vol. 88, MDAH. 14. Bond, Political Culture in the Nineteenth-Century South, 156–61; William C. Harris, Presidential Reconstruction, 51–54, 259–60, 371–405; Vernon Wharton, The Negro in Mississippi, 18651890 (1947; ...

Author: Victoria E. Bynum

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469627069

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 467

Between late 1863 and mid-1864, an armed band of Confederate deserters battled Confederate cavalry in the Piney Woods region of Jones County, Mississippi. Calling themselves the Knight Company after their captain, Newton Knight, they set up headquarters in the swamps of the Leaf River, where they declared their loyalty to the U.S. government. The story of the Jones County rebellion is well known among Mississippians, and debate over whether the county actually seceded from the state during the war has smoldered for more than a century. Adding further controversy to the legend is the story of Newt Knight's interracial romance with his wartime accomplice, Rachel, a slave. From their relationship there developed a mixed-race community that endured long after the Civil War had ended, and the ambiguous racial identity of their descendants confounded the rules of segregated Mississippi well into the twentieth century. Victoria Bynum traces the origins and legacy of the Jones County uprising from the American Revolution to the modern civil rights movement. In bridging the gap between the legendary and the real Free State of Jones, she shows how the legend--what was told, what was embellished, and what was left out--reveals a great deal about the South's transition from slavery to segregation; the racial, gender, and class politics of the period; and the contingent nature of history and memory. In a new afterword, Bynum updates readers on recent scholarship, current issues of race and Southern heritage, and the coming movie that make this Civil War story essential reading. The Free State of Jones film, starring Matthew McConaughey, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, and Keri Russell, will be released in May 2016.
Categories: History