The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick

The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick

The film explores the tragic consequences of an unbending moral code in a constantly changing universe. Essays in the volume examine Kubrick’s interest in morality and fate, revealing a Stoic philosophy at the center of many of his films.

Author: Jerold Abrams

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813172569

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 284

In the course of fifty years, director Stanley Kubrick produced some of the most haunting and indelible images on film. His films touch on a wide range of topics rife with questions about human life, behavior, and emotions: love and sex, war, crime, madness, social conditioning, and technology. Within this great variety of subject matter, Kubrick examines different sides of reality and unifies them into a rich philosophical vision that is similar to existentialism. Perhaps more than any other philosophical concept, existentialism—the belief that philosophical truth has meaning only if it is chosen by the individual—has come down from the ivory tower to influence popular culture at large. In virtually all of Kubrick’s films, the protagonist finds himself or herself in opposition to a hard and uncaring world, whether the conflict arises in the natural world or in human institutions. Kubrick’s war films (Fear and Desire, Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove, and Full Metal Jacket) examine how humans deal with their worst fears—especially the fear of death—when facing the absurdity of war. Full Metal Jacket portrays a world of physical and moral change, with an environment in continual flux in which attempting to impose order can be dangerous. The film explores the tragic consequences of an unbending moral code in a constantly changing universe. Essays in the volume examine Kubrick’s interest in morality and fate, revealing a Stoic philosophy at the center of many of his films. Several of the contributors find his oeuvre to be characterized by skepticism, irony, and unfettered hedonism. In such films as A Clockwork Orange and 2001: A Space Odyssey, Kubrick confronts the notion that we will struggle against our own scientific and technological innovations. Kubrick’s films about the future posit that an active form of nihilism will allow humans to accept the emptiness of the world and push beyond it to form a free and creative view of humanity. Taken together, the essays in The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick are an engaging look at the director’s stark vision of a constantly changing moral and physical universe. They promise to add depth and complexity to the interpretation of Kubrick’s signature films.
Categories: Performing Arts

Shadow Philosophy Plato s Cave and Cinema

Shadow Philosophy  Plato s Cave and Cinema

Offering a close reading of the controversial classic film A Clockwork Orange, and an introductory account of the central themes of the philosophical classic The Republic, this book will be of interest to both scholars and students of ...

Author: Nathan Andersen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317805885

Category: Philosophy

Page: 160

View: 194

Shadow Philosophy: Plato’s Cave and Cinema is an accessible and exciting new contribution to film-philosophy, which shows that to take film seriously is also to engage with the fundamental questions of philosophy. Nathan Andersen brings Stanley Kubrick’s film A Clockwork Orange into philosophical conversation with Plato’s Republic, comparing their contributions to themes such as the nature of experience and meaning, the character of justice, the contrast between appearance and reality, the importance of art, and the impact of images. At the heart of the book is a novel account of the analogy between Plato’s allegory of the cave and cinema, developed in conjunction with a provocative interpretation of the most powerful image from A Clockwork Orange, in which the lead character is strapped to a chair and forced to watch violent films. Key features of the book include: a comprehensive bibliography of suggested readings on Plato, on film, on philosophy, and on the philosophy of film a list of suggested films that can be explored following the approach in this book, including brief descriptions of each film, and suggestions regarding its philosophical implications a summary of Plato’s Republic, book by book, highlighting both dramatic context and subject matter. Offering a close reading of the controversial classic film A Clockwork Orange, and an introductory account of the central themes of the philosophical classic The Republic, this book will be of interest to both scholars and students of philosophy and film, as well as to readers of Plato and fans of Stanley Kubrick.
Categories: Philosophy

Kubrick s Total Cinema

Kubrick s Total Cinema

An original study of Kubrick's philosophical themes and cinematic qualities: time, light, speech, music, poiesis, corporeality, war, eros, technology, and transcendence.

Author: Philip Kuberski

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781441156877

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 462

An original study of Kubrick's philosophical themes and cinematic qualities: time, light, speech, music, poiesis, corporeality, war, eros, technology, and transcendence.
Categories: Performing Arts

Man Machine Interaction in the Work of Stanley Kubrick

Man Machine Interaction in the Work of Stanley Kubrick

Recent philosophical currents like the work of Deleuze, Maturana and the academic gender discourse try to evolve a new coining of the term 'machinic' that goes beyond rigid dualistic notions.

Author: Thorsten Felden

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783638721936

Category:

Page: 76

View: 530

Thesis (M.A.) from the year 2006 in the subject Film Science, grade: 1,3, University of Cologne (Englisches Seminar), 42 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In this paper, I want to examine Kubrick's work for the notion of man interacting with machines and relate it to various theoretical models that also deal with the relation of man and machine. I chose the term 'machine' as a generic term for any theory applying technological, mechanical or machinic ideas, most of which using the machine as a metaphor for sociological, philosophical or psychoanalytic approaches. At the same time, I want to illustrate on the basis of Kubrick's work how the theoretical discourse on this topic has changed in the course of time. Being initially cut down to a very literal understanding of machines as actual physical devices, the 20th century discourse about technology has shown that the demarcation line between what is nature and what is technology is not as easily drawn as it might appear. Man is inseparably bound up with his tools and culture as a whole could be regarded as some kind of machinery. Thus, a great part of both this paper and Kubrick's work deals with the notion of a cultural machine. Another part, however, will leave the narrow view of the machine as a strictly cultural metaphor. Recent philosophical currents like the work of Deleuze, Maturana and the academic gender discourse try to evolve a new coining of the term 'machinic' that goes beyond rigid dualistic notions. I will try to show that these ideas can be found in Kubrick's films as well.
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The Bloomsbury Companion to Stanley Kubrick

The Bloomsbury Companion to Stanley Kubrick

His most recent books are Stanley Kubrick : New York Jewish Intellectual ( 2018 ) and ... He is the editor of The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick ( 2007 ) .

Author: I.Q. Hunter

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501343650

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 396

View: 375

Stanley Kubrick is one of the most revered directors in cinema history. His 13 films, including classics such as Paths of Glory, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, and The Shining, attracted controversy, acclaim, a devoted cult following, and enormous critical interest. With this comprehensive guide to the key contexts - industrial and cultural, as well as aesthetic and critical - the themes of Kubrick's films sum up the current vibrant state of Kubrick studies. Bringing together an international team of leading scholars and emergent voices, this Companion provides comprehensive coverage of Stanley Kubrick's contribution to cinema. After a substantial introduction outlining Kubrick's life and career and the film's production and reception contexts, the volume consists of 39 contributions on key themes that both summarise previous work and offer new, often archive-based, state-of-the-art research. In addition, it is specifically tailored to the needs of students wanting an authoritative, accessible overview of academic work on Kubrick.
Categories: Performing Arts

Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick

Among the texts that were first published in English or translated into English, there are, for example: biographies (e.g., John Baxter's Stanley Kubrick ...

Author: Elisa Pezzotta

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781617038945

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 537

Although Stanley Kubrick adapted novels and short stories, his films deviate in notable ways from the source material. In particular, since 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), his films seem to definitively exploit all cinematic techniques, embodying a compelling visual and aural experience. But, as author Elisa Pezzotta contends, it is for these reasons that his cinema becomes the supreme embodiment of the sublime, fruitful encounter between the two arts and, simultaneously, of their independence. Stanley Kubrick’s last six adaptations—2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), The Shining (1980), Full Metal Jacket (1987), and Eyes Wide Shut (1999)—are characterized by certain structural and stylistic patterns. These features help to draw conclusions about the role of Kubrick in the history of cinema, about his role as an adapter, and, more generally, about the art of cinematic adaptations. The structural and stylistic patterns that characterize Kubrick adaptations seem to criticize scientific reasoning, causality, and traditional semantics. In the history of cinema, Kubrick can be considered a modernist auteur. In particular, he can be regarded as an heir of the modernist avant-garde of the 1920s. However, author Elisa Pezzotta concludes that, unlike his predecessors, Kubrick creates a cinema not only centered on the ontology of the medium, but on the staging of sublime, new experiences.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Philosophy of Horror

The Philosophy of Horror

The book invites readers to consider horror’s various manifestations and transformations since the late 1700s, probing its social, cultural, and political functions in today’s media-hungry society.

Author: Thomas Fahy

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813173702

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 879

Sitting on pins and needles, anxiously waiting to see what will happen next, horror audiences crave the fear and exhilaration generated by a terrifying story; their anticipation is palpable. But they also breathe a sigh of relief when the action is over, when they are able to close their books or leave the movie theater. Whether serious, kitschy, frightening, or ridiculous, horror not only arouses the senses but also raises profound questions about fear, safety, justice, and suffering. From literature and urban legends to film and television, horror’s ability to thrill has made it an integral part of modern entertainment. Thomas Fahy and twelve other scholars reveal the underlying themes of the genre in The Philosophy of Horror. Examining the evolving role of horror, the contributing authors investigate works such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), horror films of the 1930s, Stephen King’s novels, Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of The Shining (1980), and Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960). Also examined are works that have largely been ignored in philosophical circles, including Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood (1965), Patrick Süskind’s Perfume (1985), and James Purdy’s Narrow Rooms (2005). The analysis also extends to contemporary forms of popular horror and “torture-horror” films of the last decade, including Saw (2004), Hostel (2005), The Devil’s Rejects (2005), and The Hills Have Eyes (2006), as well as the ongoing popularity of horror on the small screen. The Philosophy of Horror celebrates the strange, compelling, and disturbing elements of horror, drawing on interpretive approaches such as feminist, postcolonial, Marxist, and psychoanalytic criticism. The book invites readers to consider horror’s various manifestations and transformations since the late 1700s, probing its social, cultural, and political functions in today’s media-hungry society.
Categories: Philosophy

Stanley Kubrick at Look Magazine

Stanley Kubrick at Look Magazine

In: The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick. Ierold I. Abrams (ed.). Lexignton, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky, pp. 149-163. Schaeffer, Iean-Marie.

Author: Philippe Mather

Publisher: Intellect Books

ISBN: 9781841506111

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 185

Sheds new light on the aesthetic factors that shaped Kubrick's artistic voice by examining the links between his photojournalist work (done between 1945 to 1950) and his films.
Categories: Performing Arts

Are We Alone

Are We Alone

This collection of those interviews represents scientific, philosophical and ethical considerations of the implications of the possibility of other forms of life.

Author: Anthony Frewin

Publisher: Elliott & Thompson

ISBN: 1904027458

Category: Extraterrestrial beings

Page: 320

View: 280

Anthony Frewin, who was Stanley Kubrick's assistant for over twenty-five years, has provided a comprehensive Introduction, a bibliography and notes to all the interviews which both contextualise and up-date the originals. Are We Alone? is a fascinating collection of essential contributions to one of the great unanswered questions of our time: Is anybody out there?
Categories: Extraterrestrial beings

A Critical Companion to Stanley Kubrick

A Critical Companion to Stanley Kubrick

The eighteen chapters in this book provide innovative readi.

Author: Elsa Colombani

Publisher: Critical Companions to Contemporary Directors

ISBN: 1793613761

Category:

Page: 326

View: 387

A Critical Companion to Stanley Kubrick provides an in-depth analysis of the director's work and offers an enriching view of the historical, philosophical, theoretical, artistic, and cinematic dimensions of his films. The eighteen chapters in this book provide innovative readings of Kubrick's oeuvre that will surely spark new discussions.
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Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick, qtd. in Ciment, Kubrick (1983), 156; Stanley Kubrick, ... of Lolita: Kubrick, Nabokov, and Poe,” in The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick, ed.

Author: Nathan Abrams

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813587134

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 340

View: 495

Stanley Kubrick is generally acknowledged as one of the world’s great directors. Yet few critics or scholars have considered how he emerged from a unique and vibrant cultural milieu: the New York Jewish intelligentsia. Stanley Kubrick reexamines the director’s work in context of his ethnic and cultural origins. Focusing on several of Kubrick’s key themes—including masculinity, ethical responsibility, and the nature of evil—it demonstrates how his films were in conversation with contemporary New York Jewish intellectuals who grappled with the same concerns. At the same time, it explores Kubrick’s fraught relationship with his Jewish identity and his reluctance to be pegged as an ethnic director, manifest in his removal of Jewish references and characters from stories he adapted. As he digs deep into rare Kubrick archives to reveal insights about the director’s life and times, film scholar Nathan Abrams also provides a nuanced account of Kubrick’s cinematic artistry. Each chapter offers a detailed analysis of one of Kubrick’s major films, including Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001, A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut. Stanley Kubrick thus presents an illuminating look at one of the twentieth century’s most renowned and yet misunderstood directors.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Stanley Kubrick The Odysseys

Stanley Kubrick  The Odysseys

The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick. University Press of Kentucky. Agel, Jérôme (1970). The Making of Kubrick's 2001. New American Library.

Author: Fabrice Jaumont

Publisher: Books We Live by

ISBN: 9781628480788

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 154

View: 885

April 2, 2018 was the 50th anniversary of a 1968 premiere screening in Washington, D.C. of Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. The film remains the most fascinating cinematographic adventure given to experience. As a tribute to the masterpiece, and to the maestro himself, this essay which was first presented in 1995 as a scholarly paper explores the multiple connections to the Odyssean theme that one may find in Stanley Kubrick's filmography. Kubrick's unweaving and re-weaving of the cinematographic tapestry reflect his attachment to the changeability implied in the Odyssean theme, which has become the theme of questioning, the perpetual questioning of one's possibilities. The camera's shuttling back and forth in time, round and round in space, through the means of dolly movements, shots and reverse shots, circular and spiraling recurrences, equates the director's shuttling between classical and avant-garde techniques, between painting and photography, between musical intensity and spatial silence. A chassé-croisé which the pluricephal director utilizes with a view to producing new angles of view and new parallaxes: a constant Kubrickian experimentation of the cinematographic language.
Categories: Performing Arts

Stanley Kubrick Produces

Stanley Kubrick Produces

The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2007. Abrams, Nathan. Stanley Kubrick: New York Jewish Intellectual.

Author: James Fenwick

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9781978814899

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 230

View: 478

Stanley Kubrick Produces provides the first comprehensive account of Stanley Kubrick’s role as a producer, and of the role of the producers he worked with throughout his career. It considers how he first emerged as a producer, how he developed the role, and how he ultimately used it to fashion himself a powerbase by the 1970s. It goes on to consider how Kubrick’s centralizing of power became a self-defeating strategy by the 1980s and 1990s, one that led him to struggle to move projects out of development and into active production. Making use of overlooked archival sources and uncovering newly discovered ‘lost’ Kubrick projects (The Cop Killer, Shark Safari, and The Perfect Marriage among them), as well as providing the first detailed overview of the World Assembly of Youth film, James Fenwick provides a comprehensive account of Kubrick’s life and career and of how he managed to obtain the level of control that he possessed by the 1970s. Along the way, the book traces the rapid changes taking place in the American film industry in the post-studio era, uncovering new perspectives about the rise of young independent producers, the operations of influential companies such as Seven Arts and United Artists, and the whole field of film marketing.
Categories: Performing Arts

Making Time in Stanley Kubrick s Barry Lyndon

Making Time in Stanley Kubrick s Barry Lyndon

(118) At the risk of over-romanticizing, I would argue for Barry Lyndon as evidence of Kubrick's late style, although I am not prepared to submit to the ...

Author: Maria Pramaggiore

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441125545

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 987

Considered by critics to be Stanley Kubrick's masterpiece, Barry Lyndon has suffered from scholarly and popular neglect. Maria Pramaggiore argues that one key reason that this film remains unappreciated, even by Kubrick aficionados, is that its transnational and intermedial contexts have not been fully explored. Taking a novel approach, she looks at the film from a transnational perspective -- as a foreign production shot in Ireland and an adaptation of a British novel by an American director about an Irish subject. Pramaggiore argues that, in Barry Lyndon, Kubrick develops his richest philosophical mediation on cinema's capacity to mediate the real and foregrounds film's relationship to other technologies of visuality, including painting, photography, and digital media. By combining extensive research into the film's source novel, production and reception with systematic textual analysis and an engagement with several key issues in contemporary academic debate, this work promises not only to make a huge impact in the field of Kubrick studies, but also in 1970s filmmaking, cultural history and transnational film practice.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Stanley Kubrick Archives

The Stanley Kubrick Archives

A comprehensive exploration of American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick's cinematic life's work and creative process featuring film stills, articles and essays by Kubrick and Kubrick scholars, letters, interviews, notes, and photographs.

Author: Alison Castle

Publisher:

ISBN: 3836555824

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 864

View: 394

A comprehensive exploration of American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick's cinematic life's work and creative process featuring film stills, articles and essays by Kubrick and Kubrick scholars, letters, interviews, notes, and photographs.
Categories: Performing Arts

After Kubrick

After Kubrick

The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 33–48. Critchley, Simon. 2013. Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, ...

Author: Jeremi Szaniawski

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501347658

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 801

Taking at its starting point the idea that Kubrick's cinema has constituted an intellectual, cerebral, and philosophical maze in which many filmmakers (as well as thinkers and a substantial fringe of the general public) have gotten lost at one point or another, this collection looks at the legacy of Kubrick's films in the 21st century. The main avenues investigated are as follows: a look at Kubrick's influence on his most illustrious followers (Paul Thomas Anderson, the Coen Brothers, Christopher Nolan, Ridley Scott, and Lars von Trier, to name a few); Kubrick in critical reception; Kubrick in stylistic (camera movements, set designs, music), thematic (artificial intelligence, new frontiers- large and small), aesthetic (the question of genre, pastiche, stereoscopy) and political terms (paranoia, democracy and secret societies, conspiracy theories). The contributions coalesce around the concept of a Kubrickian substrate, rich and complex, which permeates our Western cultural landscape very much to this day, informing and sometimes announcing/reflecting it in twisted ways, 21 years after the director's death.
Categories: Performing Arts

Love and Death in Kubrick

Love and Death in Kubrick

The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. Agel, Jerome, ed. 1970. The Making ofKubrick's 2001.

Author: Patrick Webster

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786461912

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 334

View: 621

The films of Stanley Kubrick have left an indelible mark on the history of American cinema. This text explores the auteur’s legacy, specifically positioning his body of work within the context of cultural theory. A single chapter is devoted to each of Kubrick’s seven films: Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut. Particular attention is paid to the role of love and death in Kubrick’s films, emphasizing his innovative exploration of love and sex, and the portrayal of mortality via masculine violence.
Categories: Performing Arts

Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick

In The Philosophy ofStanley Kubrick (The Philosophy ofPopular Culture). Edited by I. I. Abrams. Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky, 2007, 247—265. . ed.

Author: Stanley Kubrick

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781578062973

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 207

View: 918

From his first feature film, Fear and Desire (1953), to his final, posthumously released Eyes Wide Shut (1999), Stanley Kubrick excelled at probing the dark corners of human consciousness. In doing so, he adapted such popular novels as The Killing, Lolita, A Clockwork Orange, and The Shining and selected a wide variety of genres for his films -- black comedy (Dr. Strangelove), science fiction (2001: A Space Odyssey), and war (Paths of Glory and Full Metal Jacket). Because he was peerless in unveiling the intimate mysteries of human nature, no new film by Kubrick ever failed to spark debate or to be deeply pondered. Kubrick (1928-1999) has remained as elusive as the subjects of his films. Unlike many other filmmakers he was not inclined to grant interviews, instead preferring to let his movies speak for themselves. By allowing both critics and moviegoers to see the inner workings of this reclusive filmmaker, this first comprehensive collection of his relatively few interviews is invaluable. Ranging from 1959 to 1987 and including Kubrick's conversations with Gene Siskel, Jeremy Bernstein, Gene D. Phillips, and others, this book reveals Kubrick's diverse interests -- nuclear energy and its consequences, space exploration, science fiction, literature, religion, psychoanalysis, the effects of violence, and even chess -- and discloses how each affects his films. He enthusiastically speaks of how advances in camera and sound technology made his films more effective. Kubrick details his hands-on approach to filmmaking as he discusses why he supervises nearly every aspect of production. "All the hand-held camerawork is mine," he says in a 1972 interview about A Clockwork Orange. "In addition to the fun of doing the shooting myself, I find it virtually impossible to explain what I want in a hand-held shot to even the most talented and sensitive camera operator. " Neither guarded nor evasive, the Kubrick who emerges from these interviews is candid, opinionated, confident, and articulate. His incredible memory and his gift for organization come to light as he quotes verbatim sections of reviews, books, and articles. Despite his reputation as a recluse, the Kubrick of these interviews is approachable, witty, full of anecdotes, and eager to share a fascinating story. Gene D. Phillips, S.J., is a professor of English at Loyola University in Chicago, where he teaches fiction and the history of film. He is the author of many notable books on film and is a founding member of the editorial board of both Literature/Film Quarterly and The Tennessee Williams Journal. He was acquainted with Stanley Kubrick for twenty-five years.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Metamorphosis of Alex in Stanley Kubrick s Clockwork Orange from a Viewpoint of Abnormal Psychology

The Metamorphosis of Alex in Stanley Kubrick s  Clockwork Orange  from a Viewpoint of Abnormal Psychology

Essay from the year 2006 in the subject Psychology - Clinic and Health Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, grade: A, San Diego State University, 0 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece from ...

Author: Heiko Böttcher

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783638631099

Category: Psychology

Page: 4

View: 168

Essay from the year 2006 in the subject Psychology - Clinic and Health Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, grade: A, San Diego State University, 0 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece from 1971 dealt with deep philosophical questions without giving any answers. The observer has no easy way to identify himself with any characters or the pictured society as a full load. The movie is reflecting the dilemma that the only way to increase moral is to decrease freedom. In Kubrick’s movie the dualistic society consists only of perpetrators and victims. The roles are fixed but the persons are interchangable. Therefore there is nobody who could be able to be responsible to handle the power to decrease freedom. On the other hand there are deviant personalities that abuse their freedom to violate the law. Psychologic methods introduced in the movie cannot improve the moral of the society because they can only change a former perpetrator to a victim if the world is dichotom between “anvil and hammer”. Who then should condition the conditioners? The movie reflects the zeitgeist of the early seventies when people began to doubt that the utopia of B.F. Skinners “Walden Two” could be realized or should be wished. The ortodox behaviouristic paradigm that a human being is only a reflection of his/her learning history tottered dramatically in this time. Behaviouristic methods used by mighty officials of a sick society cannot heal criminal indiviuals and are no panacea. All they can do is take their freedom of choice. Kubrick was no psychologist and in his oeuvre he borrowed the stylistic tool of disassociation and threrfore he probably used no behavioural textbook showing the methods and he gives more a general idea about it. For example the cable system around Alex’ forehead is more a metaphor of Jesus’ crown of thorns than a necessary device in the treatment.
Categories: Psychology