The Politics of the Presidency

The Politics of the Presidency

Authors Joseph A. Pika and John Anthony Maltese are joined for the Ninth Edition by noted scholar Andrew Rudalevige as they present a thorough analysis of the change and continuity in the presidency during Barack Obama's two terms in an ...

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Veto Bargaining

Veto Bargaining

Combining game theory with unprecedented data, this book analyzes how divided party Presidents use threats and vetoes to wrest policy concessions from a hostile congress.

Author: Charles M. Cameron

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521625505

Category: Political Science

Page: 316

View: 959

Combining game theory with unprecedented data, this book analyzes how divided party Presidents use threats and vetoes to wrest policy concessions from a hostile congress.
Categories: Political Science

The Politics of the Presidency

The Politics of the Presidency

and presidential disability, 220-221 succession to presidency, 222 Vice-presidential nominee media coverage, 502 selection, 57-58 Vice-presidential office, 1 86 development of power and influence, 224-230 establishment of office, ...

Author: Richard Abernathy Watson

Publisher: Cq Press

ISBN: UOM:39015014735768

Category: Political Science

Page: 568

View: 828

Categories: Political Science

Power without Persuasion

Power without Persuasion

Power without Persuasion argues otherwise. Focusing on presidents' ability to act unilaterally, William Howell provides the most theoretically substantial and far-reaching reevaluation of presidential power in many years.

Author: William G. Howell

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400874392

Category: Political Science

Page: 263

View: 695

Since the early 1960s, scholarly thinking on the power of U.S. presidents has rested on these words: "Presidential power is the power to persuade." Power, in this formulation, is strictly about bargaining and convincing other political actors to do things the president cannot accomplish alone. Power without Persuasion argues otherwise. Focusing on presidents' ability to act unilaterally, William Howell provides the most theoretically substantial and far-reaching reevaluation of presidential power in many years. He argues that presidents regularly set public policies over vocal objections by Congress, interest groups, and the bureaucracy. Throughout U.S. history, going back to the Louisiana Purchase and the Emancipation Proclamation, presidents have set landmark policies on their own. More recently, Roosevelt interned Japanese Americans during World War II, Kennedy established the Peace Corps, Johnson got affirmative action underway, Reagan greatly expanded the president's powers of regulatory review, and Clinton extended protections to millions of acres of public lands. Since September 11, Bush has created a new cabinet post and constructed a parallel judicial system to try suspected terrorists. Howell not only presents numerous new empirical findings but goes well beyond the theoretical scope of previous studies. Drawing richly on game theory and the new institutionalism, he examines the political conditions under which presidents can change policy without congressional or judicial consent. Clearly written, Power without Persuasion asserts a compelling new formulation of presidential power, one whose implications will resound.
Categories: Political Science

The Politics of the Presidency Revised 8th Edition

The Politics of the Presidency  Revised 8th Edition

Never losing sight of the historical foundations of the office of President of the United States, the authors maintain a delicate balance as they examine the presidency through a modern lens.

Author: Joseph A. Pika

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 9781452239941

Category: Political Science

Page: 576

View: 780

Never losing sight of the historical foundations of the office of President of the United States, the authors maintain a delicate balance as they examine the presidency through a modern lens.
Categories: Political Science

The Politics of the Presidency

The Politics of the Presidency

Updated to include the first six months of the second Clinton term, this work focuses on how presidents govern and fulfil their many obligations - both in Washington and beyond.

Author: Norman C. Thomas

Publisher: Cq Press

ISBN: STANFORD:36105019356950

Category: Political Science

Page: 516

View: 830

Updated to include the first six months of the second Clinton term, this work focuses on how presidents govern and fulfil their many obligations - both in Washington and beyond. The authors also analyze the institution, the individuals who have served, and their interaction with the public.
Categories: Political Science

The Presidency and the Political System Eleventh Edition

The Presidency and the Political System  Eleventh Edition

New to the Eleventh Edition A new chapter focused on the Trump administration (Chapter 10) discusses major shifts represented by the new administration, especially in regards to the president’s relationship with the media.

Author: Michael Nelson

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 1544317298

Category: Political Science

Page: 608

View: 798

Written by top-notch presidency scholars and carefully edited into a text-reader format, The Presidency and the Political System, Eleventh Edition showcases a collection of original essays focused on a range of topics, institutions, and issues relevant to understanding the American presidency. Author Michael Nelson rigorously edits each contribution to present students with a set of analytical yet accessible chapters and contextual headnotes introducing each essay. You will read about different approaches to studying the presidency, the elements of presidential power, presidential selection, presidents and politics, and presidents and government. New to the Eleventh Edition A new chapter focused on the Trump administration (Chapter 10) discusses major shifts represented by the new administration, especially in regards to the president's relationship with the media. New coverage of Obama′s second term enables you to compare and contrast Obama's two presidential terms as well as better understand how the similarities and differences of Obama's approach compared to his predecessors. Revised, time-tested essays reflect current scholarship that explores the themes of modern presidential power and effectiveness.
Categories: Political Science

The Politics of the Presidency

The Politics of the Presidency

The Presidency and the Political System, 11th ed. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2018. Neustadt, Richard E. Presidential Power: The Politics of Leadership. New York: Wiley, 1960. Rudalevige, Andrew. The New Imperial Presidency: Renewing ...

Author: Joseph A. Pika

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 9781544389998

Category: Political Science

Page: 720

View: 392

The most up-to-date coverage and analysis of the presidency Never losing sight of the foundations of the political office, The Politics of the Presidency maintains a balance between historical context and contemporary scholarship on the executive branch, providing a solid foundation for any presidency course. In the highly anticipated Tenth Edition of this bestseller, Pika, Maltese, and Rudalevige thoroughly analyze the change and continuity in the presidency during President Trump′s first term, his relations with Congress and the judiciary, the outcomes of the 2018 midterm election, and the competitive setting for the 2020 presidential race.
Categories: Political Science

The American Presidency Under Siege

The American Presidency Under Siege

This book explores the failure of the modern American presidency, a failure the author attributes to the development of a political system that impedes creative leadership. The American presidency, Gary L. Rose argues, is under siege.

Author: Gary L. Rose

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791433374

Category: Political Science

Page: 250

View: 745

Attributes the failure of the modern presidency to the development of a political system that inherently impedes creative leadership, and offers prescriptive measures to restore the governing capacity of the president. This book explores the failure of the modern American presidency, a failure the author attributes to the development of a political system that impedes creative leadership. The American presidency, Gary L. Rose argues, is under siege. Surrounded and blockaded by a reactionary Congress, an entrenched bureaucracy, an aggressive media, lobbyists, political action committees, and special interest groups, American presidents fail not because of a lack of ability or character but because of the political system and style of politics inside the Beltway. Rose ascribes this emergence of a political system that obstructs presidential leadership to the decline of political parties as electoral and governing mechanisms. As political parties have declined, presidents have lost vital political connections that historically have enhanced their capacity to lead. He presents a variety of prescriptive measures, including political-party and legal reform, that have the potential to restore political parties and the governing capacity of the presidency. "This book fills an important gap in the literature on both the presidency and parties. The most original and provocative parts of the book concern the author's proposals for reforming the national conventions in order to revitalize them as decision-making, federal bodies, and thus to simultaneously de-emphasize the role of candidate-centered, party weakening primaries. Also, I am intrigued by the fact that Rose elaborates on the roleof patronage in party-building and explores patronage reform for the purpose of both strengthening the parties and helping presidents govern more effectively". -- Sean J. Savage, Saint Mary's College "The unique quality of this book is the manner in which it presents the problems of the presidency and the exciting manner in which it chooses among the various reforms presented. The result is a very readable and stimulating book on the presidency. It will take its place with Cronin's The State of the Presidency and Rethinking the Presidency as an important work in presidential studies, but it will stand alone because of its critical and prescriptive character". -- Robert D. Loevy, Colorado College
Categories: Political Science

The Presidency of William McKinley

The Presidency of William McKinley

While this volume touches on many aspects of McKinley's leadership, the core of it relates to the coming of the Spanish-American War, the president's conduct of the war itself, and the emergence of an American empire from 1898 to 1900.

Author: Lewis L. Gould

Publisher: University Press of Kansas

ISBN: STANFORD:36105002622848

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 629

In this interpretation of the McKinley presidency Lewis L. Gould contends that William McKinley was the first modern president. Making use of extensive original research in manuscript collections in the United States, Great Britain, and France, Gould argues that during McKinley's four and a half years in the White House the executive office began to resemble the institution as the twentieth century would know it. He rejects the erroneous stereotypes that have long obscured McKinley's historical significance: McKinley as the compliant agent of Mark Hanna or as an irresolute executive in the Cuban crisis that led to war with Spain. He contends that McKinley is an important figure in the history of the United States because of the large contributions he made to the strengthening and broadening of the power of the chief executive. While this volume touches on many aspects of McKinley's leadership, the core of it relates to the coming of the Spanish-American War, the president's conduct of the war itself, and the emergence of an American empire from 1898 to 1900. According to Gould, the Spanish-American War was not the result presidential weakness or of cowardice before public hysteria. McKinley sought to persuade Spain to relinquish Cuba peacefully, turning to war only when it became apparent that Madrid would never acquiesce. During the war, McKinley effectively directed the American military effort and the diplomacy that brought territorial acquisitions and peace. The process of making peace with Spain—involving, as it did, American annexation of the Philippines—and of securing the ratification of the resulting treaty in the Senate underscored McKinley's expansive view of presidential power. He functioned as chief diplomat, from the sending of senators on the peace commission to the personal supervision of the terms of the negotiation. At home he made tours of the West and South in 1898 to lead popular opinion to his position as no president had done before him. For the Senate he evidenced a readiness to dispense patronage, woo votes with personal persuasion, and marshal the resources of the political system behind his treaty. Later episodes in McKinley's administration support Gould's thesis. In administering Puerto Rico and Cuba and in suppressing an insurrection in the Philippines, McKinley relied further on the war power and continued to shape affairs from the White House. He sent troops to china during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900 without congressional authorization, governed the new possessions through presidential commissions, and allowed Capitol Hill only a subsidiary role in the process. By 1901 the nation had an empire and a president whose manner and bearing anticipated the imperial executives of six decades later. Gould does not argue that McKinley was a great president. He maintains, instead, that what McKinley contributed to the office, the examples he offered and the precedents he set make him an important figure in the emergence of the modern presidency in this century.
Categories: History