The Power of Judges

The Power of Judges

Given that many of these issues span national borders, the book also compares the United Kingdom’s legal system with its counterparts in the United States and Germany.

Author: David Neuberger

Publisher: Haus Publishing

ISBN: 9781912208241

Category: Law

Page: 90

View: 483

To the vast majority of the English public, the role of the United Kingdom’s Supreme Court has often been distant and incomprehensible, its judges a caste apart from society. The Power of Judges ends this mystery, exploring the fundamental concept of justice and explaining the main functions of the courts, the challenges they face, and the complexity of the judicial system. In this lucid account of the judiciary, David Neuberger and Peter Riddell lead us through an array of topics both philosophical and logistical, including the relationships between morality and law and between Parliament and the judiciary. They explain the effects of cuts in legal aid and shed light on complex and controversial subjects like assisted dying and the complexities of combating mass terrorism while protecting personal liberty. Given that many of these issues span national borders, the book also compares the United Kingdom’s legal system with its counterparts in the United States and Germany. Full of insights, The Power of Judges is an informative and accessible account of the United Kingdom’s judicial system, its contribution to running the country, and the challenges it faces—including the many threats to its effectiveness.
Categories: Law

POWER OF JUDGES TO PUNISH FOR

POWER OF JUDGES TO PUNISH FOR

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Dublin Gray Indemnity Committee

Publisher:

ISBN: 1372333126

Category: History

Page: 100

View: 990

Categories: History

The English Judges

The English Judges

... an invitation which the judges, with Lord Denning in the van, accepted. Judicial activism in this area accelerated in the 1980s and 1990s, and the power ...

Author: Robert Stevens

Publisher: Hart Publishing

ISBN: 9781841134956

Category: Law

Page: 209

View: 349

Robert Stevens examines the political influences on the English judiciary and the influence the judiciary has had on politics during the 20th-century to ascertain what needs to be done to maintain its effectiveness in the 21st-century.
Categories: Law

New York Standard Civil Practice Service Desk Book

New York Standard Civil Practice Service Desk Book

Such housing judges shall have the power of judges of the court to punish for contempts. Rules of evidence shall be applicable in actions and proceedings ...

Author: New York (State)

Publisher:

ISBN: NYPL:33433060538471

Category: Civil procedure

Page:

View: 244

Categories: Civil procedure

Power of Judges to Overrule Provisions in Wills

Power of Judges to Overrule Provisions in Wills

Discusses whether a judge can overrule provisions in a will.

Author: Christopher Reinhart

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1065524153

Category: Wills

Page: 1

View: 488

Discusses whether a judge can overrule provisions in a will.
Categories: Wills

Judicial Review in New Democracies

Judicial Review in New Democracies

This book answers these questions through an examination of three constitutional courts in Asia: Taiwan, Korea, and Mongolia.

Author: Tom Ginsburg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521520398

Category: Law

Page: 295

View: 924

New democracies around the world have adopted constitutional courts to oversee the operation of democratic politics. Where does judicial power come from, how does it develop in the early stages of democratic liberalization, and what political conditions support its expansion? This book answers these questions through an examination of three constitutional courts in Asia: Taiwan, Korea, and Mongolia. In a region that has traditionally viewed law as a tool of authoritarian rulers, constitutional courts in these three societies are becoming a real constraint on government. In contrast with conventional culturalist accounts, this book argues that the design and functioning of constitutional review are largely a function of politics and interests. Judicial review - the power of judges to rule an act of a legislature or national leader unconstitutional - is a solution to the problem of uncertainty in constitutional design. By providing insurance to prospective electoral losers, judicial review can facilitate democracy.
Categories: Law

IJA Report

IJA Report

(a) The Executive may participate in the discipline of judges, ... The power to discipline or remove a judge must be vested in an institution which is ...

Author: Institute of Judicial Administration

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105044801079

Category: Court administration

Page:

View: 934

Categories: Court administration

Modern Judge

Modern Judge

Sir Mark Hadley's aim in this book is to be frank rather than scholarly about judging.

Author: Mark Hedley

Publisher: Jordan Publishing (GB)

ISBN: 1784732796

Category:

Page: 110

View: 838

Sir Mark Hadley's aim in this book is to be frank rather than scholarly about judging. The trial judge is in a very different position to the appellate judge. The trial is where the facts are determined, and it is essentially a trial judge who exercises the powers of discretion which modern society increasingly vests in its judiciary. As society becomes more complex, so does the law. However, law cannot provide for every circumstance and so its application often involves the exercise of discretion. Criminal sentencing, child welfare, the protection of those who lack mental capacity, and disputes about medical treatment are obvious examples. How do judges go about that? How far are judges influenced or affected by their backgrounds, beliefs, and own life experiences? And, if consistency is an aspect of public justice, can that be achieved? And what about the conflict between public justice and personal privacy? These are pressing questions in a society where judges have greater effective power than ever before. [Subject: Family Law, Judicial History]
Categories:

Judges A Narrative of God s Power

Judges  A Narrative of God s Power

This should inspire us with confidence, particularly as we read this book in light of the apostle Paul's words: "Not that we are competent in ourselves to reckon anything as from ourselves, but our competency is of God . . . in order that ...

Author: Cyril J. Barber

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781592443864

Category: Religion

Page: 294

View: 568

The book of Judges deals with a people who lost their freedom--not all at once, but gradually. The Israelites were content to let the neighboring inhabitants of Canaan rule over them. Judges clearly describes the reasons for this spiritual, moral, and national decline. It began with compromise. The people's commitment to God's revealed will steadily decreased until it was no longer sufficient for the crises that arose. It was at this time that God placed tremendous responsibility in the hands of a chosen few. Judges, more than any other book of the Bible, illustrates the way the power of God is available to ordinary people to accomplish His purposes. These men and women learned through their experiences that to "those who have no might, he increases power" (Isaiah 40:29). This should inspire us with confidence, particularly as we read this book in light of the apostle Paul's words: "Not that we are competent in ourselves to reckon anything as from ourselves, but our competency is of God . . . in order that the excellency of the power may be of God and not of us" (2 Corinthians 3:5; 4:7).
Categories: Religion

Executive Summary Housing Justice in the United States

Executive Summary  Housing Justice in the United States

The judge must exercise power in those circumstances. The judge who makes maximum use of this power would probably end up being a one-person congress, ...

Author: American Bar Association. Special Committee on Housing and Urban Development Law

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105043682801

Category: Housing

Page: 32

View: 352

Categories: Housing

Federal Local Court Rules

Federal Local Court Rules

The hearing judge may appoint counsel as provided in Rule 5E or ... INHERENT POWER OF JUDGES The existence of these rules shall not limit the power of ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105063004548

Category: Court rules

Page:

View: 170

Categories: Court rules

The Judicial Power of the United States

The Judicial Power of the United States

This book reconstructs the fascinating but obscure history of the Eleventh Amendment to the US Constitution, which limits the exercise of US judicial power when American states are sued.

Author: John V. Orth

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195040999

Category: Religion

Page: 231

View: 976

This book reconstructs the fascinating but obscure history of the Eleventh Amendment to the US Constitution, which limits the exercise of US judicial power when American states are sued. Its modern meaning was largely shaped around cases concerning the liability of Southern states to pay their debts during and after Reconstruction: by shielding states from liability, the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Eleventh Amendment eased the establishment of post-Reconstruction Southern society and left a maddeningly complicated law of federal jurisdiction.
Categories: Religion

Judges and Unjust Laws

Judges and Unjust Laws

This is sure to be controversial in an age in which critics already excoriate judges for excessive activism when conducting constitutional judicial review. Edlin's challenge to conventional views is bold and compelling.

Author: Douglas E. Edlin

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472116621

Category: Law

Page: 321

View: 929

"With keen insight into the common law mind, Edlin argues that there are rich resources within the law for judges to ground their opposition to morally outrageous laws, and a legal obligation on them to overturn it, consequent on the general common law obligation to develop the law. Thus, seriously unjust laws pose for common law judges a dilemma within the law, not just a moral challenge to the law, a conflict of obligations, not just a crisis of conscience. While rooted firmly in the history of common law jurisprudence, Edlin offers an entirely fresh perspective on an age-old jurisprudential conundrum. Edlin's case for his thesis is compelling." ---Gerald J. Postema, Cary C. Boshamer Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Law, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and author of Bentham and the Common Law Tradition "Douglas Edlin builds a powerful historical, conceptual, and moral case for the proposition that judges on common law grounds should refuse to enforce unjust legislation. This is sure to be controversial in an age in which critics already excoriate judges for excessive activism when conducting constitutional judicial review. Edlin's challenge to conventional views is bold and compelling." ---Brian Z. Tamanaha, Chief Judge Benjamin N. Cardozo Professor of Law, St. John's University, and author of Law as a Means to an End: Threat to the Rule of Law "Professor Edlin's fascinating and well-researched distinction between constitutional review and common law review should influence substantially both scholarship on the history of judicial power in the United States and contemporary jurisprudential debates on the appropriate use of that power." ---Mark Graber, Professor of Law and Government, University of Maryland, and author of Dred Scott and the Problem of Constitutional Evil Is a judge legally obligated to enforce an unjust law? In Judges and Unjust Laws, Douglas E. Edlin uses case law analysis, legal theory, constitutional history, and political philosophy to examine the power of judicial review in the common law tradition. He finds that common law tradition gives judges a dual mandate: to apply the law and to develop it. There is no conflict between their official duty and their moral responsibility. Consequently, judges have the authority---perhaps even the obligation---to refuse to enforce laws that they determine unjust. As Edlin demonstrates, exploring the problems posed by unjust laws helps to illuminate the institutional role and responsibilities of common law judges. Douglas E. Edlin is Associate Professor of Political Science at Dickinson College.
Categories: Law

A Distinct Judicial Power

A Distinct Judicial Power

Part II, the bulk of the book, chronicles how each of the original thirteen states and their colonial antecedents treated their respective judiciaries.

Author: Scott Douglas Gerber

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199780969

Category: Law

Page: 440

View: 789

A Distinct Judicial Power: The Origins of an Independent Judiciary, 1606-1787, by Scott Douglas Gerber, provides the first comprehensive critical analysis of the origins of judicial independence in the United States. Part I examines the political theory of an independent judiciary. Gerber begins chapter 1 by tracing the intellectual origins of a distinct judicial power from Aristotle's theory of a mixed constitution to John Adams's modifications of Montesquieu. Chapter 2 describes the debates during the framing and ratification of the federal Constitution regarding the independence of the federal judiciary. Part II, the bulk of the book, chronicles how each of the original thirteen states and their colonial antecedents treated their respective judiciaries. This portion, presented in thirteen separate chapters, brings together a wealth of information (charters, instructions, statutes, etc.) about the judicial power between 1606 and 1787, and sometimes beyond. Part III, the concluding segment, explores the influence the colonial and early state experiences had on the federal model that followed and on the nature of the regime itself. It explains how the political theory of an independent judiciary examined in Part I, and the various experiences of the original thirteen states and their colonial antecedents chronicled in Part II, culminated in Article III of the U.S. Constitution. It also explains how the principle of judicial independence embodied by Article III made the doctrine of judicial review possible, and committed that doctrine to the protection of individual rights.
Categories: Law