The Printer as Author in Early Modern English Book History

The Printer as Author in Early Modern English Book History

The First Book Printed in Anglo-Saxon Types. Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society 3.4, 265–291. Brooks, D.A. 2005. Introduction. In: D.A. Brooks, ed. Printing and Parenting in Early Modern England.

Author: William E. Engel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429628207

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 960

This is the first book to demonstrate how mnemotechnical cultural commonplaces can be used to account for the look, style, and authorized content of some of the most influential books produced in early modern Britain. In his hybrid role as stationer, publisher, entrepreneur, and author, John Day, master printer of England’s Reformation, produced the premier navigation handbook, state-approved catechism and metrical psalms, Book of Martyrs, England’s first printed emblem book, and Queen Elizabeth’s Prayer Book. By virtue of finely honed book trade skills, dogged commitment to evangelical nation-building, and astute business acumen (including going after those who infringed his privileges), Day mobilized the typographical imaginary to establish what amounts to—and still remains—a potent and viable Protestant Memory Art.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Printer As Author in Early Modern English Book History

The Printer As Author in Early Modern English Book History

"This is the first book to demonstrate how mnemotechnical cultural commonplaces can be used to account for the look, style, and authorized content of some of the most influential books produced in early modern Britain.

Author: William E. Engel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429032439

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 745

"This is the first book to demonstrate how mnemotechnical cultural commonplaces can be used to account for the look, style, and authorized content of some of the most influential books produced in early modern Britain. In his hybrid role as stationer, publisher, entrepreneur, and author, John Day, master printer of England's Reformation, produced the premier navigation handbook, state-approved catechism and metrical psalms, Book of Martyrs, England's first printed emblem book, and Queen Elizabeth's Prayer Book. By virtue of finely honed book trade skills, dogged commitment to evangelical nation-building, and astute business acumen (including going after those who infringed his privileges), Day mobilized the typographical imaginary to establish what amounts to-and still remains-a potent and viable Protestant Memory Art"--
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Evolution of Editorial Style in Early Modern England

The Evolution of Editorial Style in Early Modern England

Hence, this final chapter explores how Coleridge's mark-up in Ashley MS 408 provides evidence of not only how early modern printer's manuals influenced authors' correction of typeset page proofs, but also how marginal spaces ...

Author: Jocelyn Hargrave

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030202750

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 110

This book provides a historical study on the evolution of editorial style and its progress towards standardisation through an examination of early modern English style guides. The text considers the variety of ways authors, editors and printers directly implemented or uniquely interpreted and adapted the guidelines of these style guides as part of their inherently human editorial practice. Offering a critical mapping of early modern style guides, Jocelyn Hargrave explores when and how style guides originated, how they contributed to the evolution of editorial practice and how they impacted the overall publishing of content.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England

Women   s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England

... publishers, printers, authors, editors, owners, readers and collectors, these and other women in this volume accomplished impressive work in book history and were active participants in the cultural life of early modern England.

Author: Valerie Wayne

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350110021

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 165

This collection reveals the valuable work that women achieved in publishing, printing, writing and reading early modern English books, from those who worked in the book trade to those who composed, selected, collected and annotated books. Women gathered rags for paper production, invested in books and oversaw the presses that printed them. Their writing and reading had an impact on their contemporaries and the developing literary canon. A focus on women's work enables these essays to recognize the various forms of labour -- textual and social as well as material and commercial -- that women of different social classes engaged in. Those considered include the very poor, the middling sort who were active in the book trade, and the elite women authors and readers who participated in literary communities. Taken together, these essays convey the impressive work that women accomplished and their frequent collaborations with others in the making, marking, and marketing of early modern English books.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Printing and Parenting in Early Modern England

Printing and Parenting in Early Modern England

He is the author of Illustrating the Past in Early Modern England: The Representation of History in Printed Books (Ashgate, 2003). Laurie E. Maguire is Tutorial Fellow of English at Magdalen College, Oxford and a Lecturer in English at ...

Author: Douglas A. Brooks

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351908832

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 454

View: 552

The relation between procreation and authorship, between reproduction and publication, has a long history - indeed, that relationship may well be the very foundation of history itself. The essays in this volume bring into focus a remarkably important and complex phase of this long history. In this volume, some of the most renowned scholars in the field persuasively demonstrate that during the early modern period, the awkward, incomplete transition from manuscript to print brought on by the invention of the printing press temporarily exposed and disturbed the epistemic foundations of English culture. As a result of this cultural upheaval, the discursive field of parenting was profoundly transformed. Through an examination of the literature of the period, this volume illuminates how many important conceptual systems related to gender, sexuality, human reproduction, legitimacy, maternity, kinship, paternity, dynasty, inheritance, and patriarchal authority came to be grounded in a range of anxieties and concerns directly linked to an emergent publishing industry and book trade. In exploring a wide spectrum of historical and cultural artifacts produced during the convergence of human and mechanical reproduction, of parenting and printing, these essays necessarily bring together two of the most vital critical paradigms available to scholars today: gender studies and the history of the book. Not only does this rare interdisciplinary coupling generate fresh and exciting insights into the literary and cultural production of the early modern period but it also greatly enriches the two critical paradigms themselves.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading History in Early Modern England

Reading History in Early Modern England

Rather , the present work is devoted to the after - life of historical texts , as words written on paper or parchment made their way from author through printer and publisher and into book form ; how those books then were distributed ...

Author: D. R. Woolf

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521780462

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 709

A study of writing, publishing and marketing history books in the early modern period.
Categories: History

Reading Material in Early Modern England

Reading Material in Early Modern England

... on the title page.84 Book owners ' expansion of authors ' initials on title pages suggests the early modern ... of the relations between writers and printers in the period , see Febvre and Martin , Coming of the Book , pp .

Author: Heidi Brayman Hackel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521842514

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 322

View: 176

Reading Material in Early Modern England rediscovers the practices and representations of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English readers. By telling their stories and insisting upon their variety, Brayman Hackel displaces both the singular 'ideal' reader of literacy theory and the elite male reader of literacy history.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Bible Readers and Lay Writers in Early Modern England

Bible Readers and Lay Writers in Early Modern England

As in the case of collage prayers, it is not the habits or resources of different printers that cause the ... line between meditation and prayer during the course of the late sixteenth century, and many traditional prayer books include ...

Author: Kate Narveson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317174431

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 482

Bible Readers and Lay Writers in Early Modern England studies how immersion in the Bible among layfolk gave rise to a non-professional writing culture, one of the first instances of ordinary people taking up the pen as part of their daily lives. Kate Narveson examines the development of the culture, looking at the close connection between reading and writing practices, the influence of gender, and the habit of applying Scripture to personal experience. She explores too the tensions that arose between lay and clergy as layfolk embraced not just the chance to read Scripture but the opportunity to create a written record of their ideas and experiences, acquiring a new control over their spiritual self-definition and a new mode of gaining status in domestic and communal circles. Based on a study of print and manuscript sources from 1580 to 1660, this book begins by analyzing how lay people were taught to read Scripture both through explicit clerical instruction in techniques such as note-taking and collation, and through indirect means such as exposure to sermons, and then how they adapted those techniques to create their own devotional writing. The first part of the book concludes with case studies of three ordinary lay people, Anne Venn, Nehemiah Wallington, and Richard Willis. The second half of the study turns to the question of how gender registers in this lay scripturalist writing, offering extended attention to the little-studied meditations of Grace, Lady Mildmay. Narveson concludes by arguing that by mid-century, despite clerical anxiety, writing was central to lay engagement with Scripture and had moved the center of religious experience beyond the church walls.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Readers and Authorship in Early Modern England

Readers and Authorship in Early Modern England

Yet , if early modern readers applied different approaches to , say , the Bible , a political pamphlet , or a ... and Obedient : English Books for Women , 1475–1640 ( San Marino , 1982 ) , and Brian Richardson , Printing , Writers and ...

Author: Stephen B. Dobranski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521842964

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 226

View: 419

Publisher Description
Categories: Literary Criticism

A New Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture

A New Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture

Print, and Literary Culture in Early Modern Feather , John ( 1988 ). A History of Book Publishing . London : Croom Helm . England . ... YearComing of the Book: The Impact of Printing, 1450– 1800 , new edn., trans. ... What is an author?

Author: Michael Hattaway

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405187626

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1224

View: 640

In this revised and greatly expanded edition of the Companion, 80 scholars come together to offer an original and far-reaching assessment of English Renaissance literature and culture. A new edition of the best-selling Companion to English Renaissance Literature, revised and updated, with 22 new essays and 19 new illustrations Contributions from some 80 scholars including Judith H. Anderson, Patrick Collinson, Alison Findlay, Germaine Greer, Malcolm Jones, Arthur Kinney, James Knowles, Arthur Marotti, Robert Miola and Greg Walker Unrivalled in scope and its exploration of unfamiliar literary and cultural territories the Companion offers new readings of both ‘literary’ and ‘non-literary’ texts Features essays discussing material culture, sectarian writing, the history of the body, theatre both in and outside the playhouses, law, gardens, and ecology in early modern England Orientates the beginning student, while providing advanced students and faculty with new directions for their research All of the essays from the first edition, along with the recommendations for further reading, have been reworked or updated
Categories: Literary Criticism