The Social Life of Kimono

The Social Life of Kimono

Ryokan Japanese style inns will have innkeepers, maids, and waitresses in kimono. High-class Japanese restaurants follow this tradition, as do some drinking establishments, hostess bars, and other night life locations.

Author: Sheila Cliffe

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472585554

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 524

The kimono is an iconic garment with a history as rich and colourful as the textiles from which it is crafted. Deeply associated with Japanese culture both past and present, it has often been thought of as a highly gendered, rigidly traditional and unchanging national costume. This book challenges that perception, revealing the nuanced meanings and messages behind the kimono from the point of view of its wearers and producers, many of whom – both men and women – see the garment as a vehicle for self-expression. Taking a material culture approach, The Social Life of Kimono is the first study to combine the history of the kimono as a fashionable garment with an in-depth exploration of its multifaceted role today on both the street and the catwalk. Through case studies covering historical advertising campaigns, fashion magazines, interviews with contemporary kimono designers, large scale and small craft producers, and consumers who choose to wear them, The Social Life of Kimono gives a unique insight into making and meaning of this complex garment.
Categories: History

The Social Life of Kimono

The Social Life of Kimono

Preface Introduction 1.

Author: Sheila Cliffe

Publisher:

ISBN: 1474286100

Category: Clothing and dress

Page: 229

View: 800

The kimono is an iconic garment with a history as rich and colourful as the textiles from which it is crafted. Deeply associated with Japanese culture both past and present, it has often been thought of as a highly gendered, rigidly traditional, and unchanging national costume. This text challenges that perception, revealing the nuanced meanings and messages behind the kimono from the point of view of its wearers and producers, many of whom - both men and women - see the garment as a vehicle for self-expression.
Categories: Clothing and dress

Rethinking Fashion Globalization

Rethinking Fashion Globalization

She has researched the social history of kimono, has lectured at conferences, museums and events in Japan, ... Dezain Gakkai Kenkyū Happyō Taikai Gaiyōshū Seni Torendo Sheila Cliffe, The Social Life of Kimono (London: Bloomsbury, 2018).

Author: Sarah Cheang

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350181304

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 399

Rethinking Fashion Globalization is a timely call to rewrite the fashion system and push back against Eurocentric dominance within fashion histories by presenting new models, approaches and understandings of fashion from critical thinkers at the forefront of decolonial fashion discourse. This edited collection draws together original, diverse, and richly reflective critiques of the fashion system from both established and emerging fashion scholars, researchers and creative practitioners. Chapters straddle current calls for decolonization and inclusion, as well as reflections on de-westernization, post-colonialism, sustainability, transnationalism, national identities, social activism, global fashion narratives, diversity, and more. The volume is divided into three key themes, 'Disruptions in Time and Space', 'Nationalism and Transnationalism' and 'Global Design Practices'. These themes re-map fashion's origins, practices and futures, to present alternatives for reclaiming and rethinking fashion globalization in the 21st century.
Categories: Social Science

Kyoto Revisited

Kyoto Revisited

“Outside the Glass Case: The Social Life of Urban Heritage in Kyoto. ... Urban Spaces in Japan: Cultural and Social Perspectives. London: Routledge. Bruner, Edward. 1994. ... The Social Life of Kimono: Japanese Fashion Past and Present.

Author: Jennifer S. Prough

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824891688

Category: Travel

Page: 241

View: 908

There is a charm to Kyoto. Surrounded by lush green hills, the city feels alive with nature, history, culture—and tourists. At once ancient capital, modern city, and home to numerous cultural heritage sites, Kyoto looms large in the promotion of Japanese culture at home and abroad. In the wake of years of economic recession followed by the national promotion of “cool Japan” in popular culture and tourism of the twenty-first century, anthropologist Jennifer Prough sets out to examine how the city’s history and culture have been mobilized to create heritage experiences for today’s tourists. The heart of her book, Kyoto Revisited, centers on what it means to produce these for visitors, why seeing and feeling culture and tradition appeal to both domestic and international travelers, and the challenges faced by a heritage tourism city. As Prough’s study suggests, heritage has multiple meanings. It is created as interested parties—state and local, public and private—tell different stories about the past, which are marketed in response to tourists’ desire for face-to-face engagement in an experience economy. Her work examines several prominent features of Kyoto tourism, including promotion plans, heritage neighborhood renovation, the role of the seasons and traditional aesthetics in citywide events, the appeal of sites commemorating the Meiji restoration, and the trend of walking in the heritage district in a rented kimono. Throughout Prough brings together scholarship from Japanese studies, heritage studies, and the anthropology of tourism to highlight the interplay between the romantic desire for heritage tourism and the emphasis on “personal experience” (taiken) in the visitor industry today. Experience has long been an integral part of tourism—even as what counts as experience has shifted across time and place (from taking a photo to staying with locals to trying one’s hand at a traditional craft)—yet these touristic desires take on a new tinge in the experience economy. Kyoto Revisited demonstrates not only how the past has been used to construct the city’s identity and shape understandings of Japan for travelers, but also how these speak to broader trends in our contemporary moment.
Categories: Travel

Organization Development and Society

Organization Development and Society

As we explored Kimono's social life more deeply, it became apparent that the avoidance of active participation on the part of the operation department's employees was relatively new. In the recent past, they had taken an active role in ...

Author: Baruch Shimoni

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351264822

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 128

View: 385

Organization Development and Society: Theory and Practice of Organization Development Consulting offers a new approach for the practice of organization development (OD). The new approach, a habitus oriented OD (HOOD), sees consultees' thinking and behavior a result of habitus, a cognitive structure developed historically in endless interactions between human behavior and social structures. HOOD has two goals: The first goal is to redefine the objectives of individually oriented OD. The focus on habitus and social structure allows individually oriented OD scholars and practitioners to keep their subjective approach, which searches for consultees' inner world. However, this subjectivity searches not only for consultees' psychological but their social dispositions. It views the individual level, the habitus, as a site of social dispositions that from within the individual consultees generate thoughts and behaviors in a way that closely corresponds with the organization's social structure; with power relations and social positions and with accepted metaphors and common language. The HOOD links the concept of habitus to the field of OD and in so doing provides an alternative way to incorporate the individual and the social in OD. HOOD's second goal is to re/position OD between organizations and society and thus to produce a consulting practice that is both pragmatic and human. It is pragmatic since incorporation of habitus enables the consultant to liberate consultees' perspectives and behavior from the organization's social and structural hoops and to use these perspectives in processes of change and development. Considering the habitus as central to consulting projects is human since it enables consultants (and consultees) to identify the responsibility for organizational problems (and other phenomena) not only at the level of the individual but also at the level of the organization and the environment outside the organization.
Categories: Business & Economics

Japan beyond the Kimono

Japan beyond the Kimono

In terms of the kimono today, art historian and Japanese textile expert, Terry Satsuki Milhaupt makes an apt point ... It shows fashion's interconnectedness with all aspects of social life, including its function as a political tool and ...

Author: Jenny Hall

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350095434

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 245

In the ancient city of Kyoto, contemporary artisans and designers are using heritage techniques and traditional clothing aesthetics to reinvent wafuku (Japanese clothing, including kimono) for modern life. Japan Beyond the Kimono explores these shifts, highlighting developments in the Kyoto fashion industry such as its integration of digital weaving and printing techniques and the influence of social media on fashion distribution systems. Through case studies of designers, artisans, and retailers, Jenny Hall provides a comprehensive picture of the reasons behind the production and consumption of these rejuvenated fashion goods. She argues that conceptualisations of Japanese tradition include innovation and change, which is vital to understanding how Japanese cultural heritage is both sustained and evolving. Essential reading for students and scholars of fashion, anthropology, and Japanese studies, Jenny Hall's sensory ethnography is the first of its kind, describing the lived experiences of people in the Kyoto textiles industry, explaining the renewal of traditional techniques and styles, and placing them both within contexts such as transnational 'craftscapes' and fast or slow fashion systems.
Categories: Social Science

Cosmopolitan Culture

Cosmopolitan Culture

... but where stores are filled with kimono displays and the streets are filled with sophisticated Japanese on an international tour, who will point and laugh at a Japanese woman in a kimono? Social life takes us beyond our private ...

Author: Bonnie Menes Kahn

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743244039

Category: Fiction

Page: 344

View: 829

From Simon & Schuster, Cosmopolitan Culture is Bonnie Menes Kahn's exploration of the gilt-edged dream of a tolerant city. "The author attempts to identify common features of great cities, past and present. Consequently, the reader is shuttled breathlessly from Babylon to Constantinople to Vienna to New York with brief side junkets. Kahn concludes that common characteristics of the great city meaning and purpose, tolerance, etc.created an environment where outsiders felt welcome to join the cosmopolitan culture and in the process strengthen it." —Library Journal
Categories: Fiction

Gastrofashion from Haute Cuisine to Haute Couture

Gastrofashion from Haute Cuisine to Haute Couture

... Space, and Value Sheila Cliffe, The Social Life of Kimono: Japanese Fashion Past and Present Linda Welters and Abby Lillethun, Fashion History: A Global View Therèsa M. Winge, Costuming Cosplay: Dressing the Imagination Jenny Hall, ...

Author: Adam Geczy

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350147485

Category: Design

Page: 248

View: 593

For hundreds of years consumers and scholars have acknowledged that food is affected by the same rapid shifts in taste and consumption as clothing. Trends in fashion and in food are increasingly being marketed in tandem and sold as fashionable commodities to reinforce capitalist power. Yet despite this, the reciprocal relationship between fashion and food has not been fully explored – until now. Gastrofashion from Haute Cuisine to Haute Couture examines the relationship between food and fashion in clothing, style, and dress in all its manifestations, from the restaurant to the catwalk, to cookbooks, diet fads, slow food, fast fashion, celebrity chefs, artists, and musical performers. It traces the relationship between food and fashion back to the Middle Ages, to the rise of social refinements in manners, speech, clothing, and taste, when behaviours and appearances reflected social status and propriety and where the social display of wealth and privilege were inseparable from food and clothing. Nowadays, designer eateries such as Pasticceria Prada and Armani Ristorante and the display of food on fashion catwalks are the precursors of the restaurants of pre-Revolutionary France and the spectacles of world fairs and exhibitions. This much-needed book offers a substantive and incisive discussion for all those interested in the complex interrelationship between food and fashion – scholars, students, and general readers alike.
Categories: Design

Libertine Fashion

Libertine Fashion

... Space, and Value Sheila Cliffe, The Social Life of Kimono: Japanese Fashion Past and Present Linda Welters and Abby Lillethun, Fashion History: A Global View Therèsa M. Winge, Costuming Cosplay: Dressing the Imagination Jenny Hall, ...

Author: Adam Geczy

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350054097

Category: Design

Page: 256

View: 425

Libertine practices have long been associated with transgression and social deviance. This innovative book is the first to focus fully on the relationship between libertinism as a social phenomenon and as a form of fashion. Taking the reader from early modernity to the present day, Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas reveal how the connection between clothing and the taboo, the erotic, and the forbidden is at the heart of "libertine fashion". Moving from the decadent courts of Charles II and Louis XV to the catwalks of the 21st century, Libertine Fashion examines literary and sartorial figures ranging from the Marquis de Sade and Lord Byron to Oscar Wilde, Josephine Baker, Colette, and Madonna. Focusing on libertinism as a sartorial practice and identity, this book traces the genealogy of the concept through the proto feminists of the English Reformation, the hedonistic decadents of the fin de siècle, and the Flappers of the Roaring 20s. The historical arc traverses the 1970s era of punk and glam, the shapeshifting personae of David Bowie, and the “disciplinary regimes” of Jean-Paul Gaultier. Looking at libertine practices and appearances with fresh eyes, this bracing and original book affords many new insights into transgressive style, and of the relationship between sexuality and clothing. Accessible and thoroughly researched, Libertine Fashion uses a multidisciplinary approach that draws on historical literature, film, fashion, philosophy, and popular culture. Offering a historical and philosophical grounding in contemporary forms of identity and dress, it is essential reading for students and scholars of fashion, gender, sexuality, and cultural studies.
Categories: Design

Asia Case Studies in the Social Sciences A Guide for Teaching

Asia  Case Studies in the Social Sciences   A Guide for Teaching

Case Studies in the Social Sciences - A Guide for Teaching Myron L. Cohen. Town (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982) is the single most comprehensive account of the structure and life of a Japanese city during this period. 5.

Author: Myron L. Cohen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315288154

Category: Social Science

Page: 550

View: 234

The material in this study is covered by Myron L. Cohen on religion and family organization in China; John R. Bowen on family, kinship, and Islam in Indonesia; Robert W. Hefner on hierarchy and stratification in Java; and Nancy Rosenberger on gender roles in Japan. Further material is provided by William W. Kelly on rural society in Japan; Theodore C. Bestor on urban life in Japan; Stephen R. Smith on the family in Japan; Doranne Jacobson on gender relations in India; Lawrence A. Babb on religion in India; Owen M. Lynch on stratification, inequality, and the caste system in India; Laurell Kendall on changing gender relations in Korea; Andrew G. Walder on comparative revolution in China and Vietnam, Maoism, and the sociology of work in China and Japan; Moni Nag on the comparative demography of China, Japan, and India; and Helen Hardacre on the new religions of Japan. Other contributors offering information through case studies are Hiroshi Ishida on stratification and mobility in Japan; Robert C. Liebman on work and education compared in Japan and the US; Joseph W. Elder on education, urban society, urban problems, and industrial society in India; Andrew J. Nathan on totalitarianism, authoritarianism, and democracy in China; Jean C. Oi on mobilisation and participation in China; Edwin A. Winckler on political development in Taiwan; Carl H. Lande on political parties and representation in the Philippines ; Clark N. Neher on political development and political participation in Thailand; and Benedict R. O'G. Anderson on political culture, the military, and authoritarianism in Indonesia. The final chapters of this work include studies by Stephen Philip Cohen on the military in India and Pakistan; Paul R. Brass on democracy and political participation in India; T.J. Pempel on Japanese democracy and political culture, political parties and representation, and bureaucracy in Japan; Han-kyo Kim on political development in South Korea; and Thomas G. Rawski on the economies of China and Japan.
Categories: Social Science