The Sources of Beneventan Chant

The Sources of Beneventan Chant

Thomas Forrest Kelly has identified and collected the surviving sources of an important repertory of early medieval music, the so-called Beneventan Chant used in southern Italy in the early middle ages, before this area's adoption of the ...

Author: PROFESSOR THOMAS FORREST. KELLY

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138375802

Category:

Page: 404

View: 241

The area whose capital was the southern Lombard city of Benevento developed a culture identified with the characteristic form of writing known as the Beneventan script, which was used throughout the area and was brought to perfection at the abbey of Montecassino in the late eleventh century. This repertory, along with other now-vanished or suppressed local varieties of music, give a far richer picture of the variety of musical practice in early medieval Europe than was formerly available. Thomas Forrest Kelly has identified and collected the surviving sources of an important repertory of early medieval music; this is the so-called Beneventan Chant, used in southern Italy in the early middle ages, before the adoption there of the now-universal music known as Gregorian chant. Because it was deliberately suppressed in the course of the eleventh century, this music survives mostly in fragments and palimpsests, and the fascinating process of restoring the repertory piece by piece is told in the studies in this book. A companion volume to this collection also by Professor Kelly details the practice of Medieval music.
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The Beneventan Chant

The Beneventan Chant

2 THE MANUSCRIPT SOURCES OF BENEVENTAN CHANT The manuscripts that preserve Beneventan chant are not many , and most of them are fragmentary , palimpsest , or record the survival of only a piece or two . Of formerly complete books of ...

Author: Thomas Forrest Kelly

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 0521343100

Category: Music

Page: 350

View: 548

Thomas Kelly's major study of the Beneventan chant reinstates one of the oldest surviving bodies of Western music: the Latin church music of southern Italy as it existed before the spread of Gregorian chant.
Categories: Music

Chant and its Origins

Chant and its Origins

Beneventan. Chant". Thomas Forrest KELLY Oberlin (USA) On the twenty-third of December, 1908, the diocesan newspaper La Settimana of Benevento carried the ... But there is still no comprehensive study, and no complete list of sources.

Author: ThomasForrest Kelly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351572385

Category: History

Page: 542

View: 468

The Latin liturgical music of the medieval church is the earliest body of Western music to survive in a more or less complete form. It is a body of thousands of individual pieces, of striking beauty and aesthetic appeal, which has the special quality of embodying, of giving voice to, the words of the liturgy itself. Plainchant is the music that underpins essentially all other music of the middle ages (and far beyond), and is the music that is most abundantly preserved. It is a subject that has engaged a great deal of research and debate in the last fifty years and the nature of the complex issues that have recently arisen in research on chant are explored here in an overview of current issues and problems.
Categories: History

Chant and Notation in South Italy and Rome before 1300

Chant and Notation in South Italy and Rome before 1300

Thomas Forrest Kelly's The Beneventan Chant describes the regional chant of the southern Italian Lombard duchy of ... reaching back to the early 1900s ; a report on Kelly's own discoveries of new manuscript sources , several of them ...

Author: John Boe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351217651

Category: History

Page: 442

View: 725

The fifteen studies assembled here grew out of research on south-Italian ordinary chants and tropes for the multi-volume series Beneventanum Troporum Corpus II, edited by John Boe in collaboration with Alejandro Planchart. In the present essays, clerical and ordinary chants and tropes of the Mass (especially when derived from paraliturgical hymns and poems), certain aspects of chant notation and particular facets of the old Beneventan and the old Roman chant repertories are examined in relation to the three main cultic centres of the Italian south - Benevento, Montecassino and Rome - and as they relate to their European context, namely Frankish and Norman chant and the varieties of chant sung in Italy north of Rome. The volume includes one previously unpublished study, on the Roman introit Salus Populi.
Categories: History

Medieval Italy

Medieval Italy

The surviving sources of Beneventan chant, numbering almost a hundred manuscripts and fragments, describe a geographical area in which the so-called Beneventan script was practiced and which matches the range of the Lombards' domination ...

Author: Christopher Kleinhenz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135948801

Category: History

Page: 2160

View: 716

This Encyclopedia gathers together the most recent scholarship on Medieval Italy, while offering a sweeping view of all aspects of life in Italy during the Middle Ages. This two volume, illustrated, A-Z reference is a cross-disciplinary resource for information on literature, history, the arts, science, philosophy, and religion in Italy between A.D. 450 and 1375. For more information including the introduction, a full list of entries and contributors, a generous selection of sample pages, and more, visit the Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia website.
Categories: History

Routledge Revivals Medieval Italy 2004

Routledge Revivals  Medieval Italy  2004

The surviving sources of Beneventan chant, numbering almost a hundred manuscripts and fragments, describe a geographical area in which the so-called Beneventan script was practiced and which matches the range of the Lombards' domination ...

Author: Christopher Kleinhenz

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781351664462

Category: History

Page: 626

View: 223

First published in 2004, Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia provides an introduction to the many and diverse facets of Italian civilization from the late Roman empire to the end of the fourteenth century. It presents in two volumes articles on a wide range of topics including history, literature, art, music, urban development, commerce and economics, social and political institutions, religion and hagiography, philosophy and science. This illustrated, A-Z reference is a cross-disciplinary resource and will be of key interest not only to students and scholars of history but also to those studying a range of subjects, as well as the general reader.
Categories: History

Early Music History

Early Music History

... but the sources of Old Beneventan chant are written practically without exception in the characteristic ... The chief surviving sources are probably from Benevento itself : the two eleventh - century graduals Benevento 38 and 40 ...

Author: Iain Fenlon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521104327

Category: Music

Page: 296

View: 739

Early Music History is devoted to the study of music from the early Middle Ages to the end of the seventeenth century. It demands the highest standards of scholarship from its contributors, all of whom are leading academics in their fields. It gives preference to studies pursuing interdisciplinary approaches and to those developing novel methodological ideas. The scope is exceptionally broad and includes manuscript studies, textual criticism, iconography, studies of the relationship between words and music and the relationship between music and society. The office of the cantor in early Western monastic rules and customaries: a preliminary investigation; Montecassino and the Old Beneventan chant; and Music and ceremonial in the Low Countries: Philip the fair and the Order of the Golden Fleece.
Categories: Music

Chants Hypertext and Prosulas

Chants  Hypertext  and Prosulas

Benevento, Biblioteca Capitolare, 38. Gradual with tropes and proses, Benevento, before 1050. Ben38 (Figure 2.3) is a gradual, also acephalous, and the second richest source for Beneventan chant. Its ultimate origins are still unknown, ...

Author: Luisa Nardini

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197514139

Category: Music

Page: 328

View: 383

"The liturgical chant that was sung in the churches of Southern Italy between the ninth and the thirteenth centuries reflects the multiculturalism of a territory in which Roman, Franks, Lombards, Byzantines, Normans, Jews, and Muslims were present at various titles and with different political roles. This book examines a specific genre, the prosulas that were composed to embellish and expand pre-existing liturgical chants of the liturgy of mass. Widespread in medieval Europe, prosulas were highly cultivated in southern Italy, especially by the nuns, monks, and clerics the city of Benevento. They shed light on the creativity of local cantors to provide new meanings to the liturgy in accordance with contemporary waves of religious spirituality and to experiment with a novel musical style in which a syllabic setting is paired with the free-flowing melody of the parent chant. In their representing an epistemological 'beyond' and because of their interconnectedness with the parent chant, they can be likened to modern hypertexts. The emphasis on universal saints of ancient lineage stressed the perceived links with the cradles of Christianity, Africa and the Levant, and the centre of the Papal power, Rome, while the high number of Christological prosulas in manuscripts used in nunneries might be tied to the devotion to Jesus as 'spiritual spouse' that was typical of female religiosity. Full edition of texts, melodies, and manuscript facsimiles in the companion website enrich the study of the stylistic features and the cultural components of this fascinating genre"--
Categories: Music

Western Plainchant

Western Plainchant

BENEVENTO AND MONTECASSINO The existence of a non - Roman rite and corresponding non - Roman chant in the Lombard duchy of Benevento has already been discussed ( VIII.5 ) . The principal sources of Old Beneventan chant are in fact ...

Author: David Hiley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198165722

Category: Music

Page: 661

View: 861

Plainchant is the oldest substantial body of music that has been preserved in any shape or form. It was first written down in Western Europe in the wake of the Carolingian renaissance of the 8th and 9th centuries. Many thousands of chants have been sung at different times or places in a multitude of forms and styles, responding to the differing needs of the church through the ages. This book provides a clear and concise introduction, designedboth for those to whom the subject is new and those who require a reference work for advanced studies. It begins with an explanation of the liturgies which plainchant was designed to serve. All thechief genres of chant, different types of liturgical book, and plainchant notations are described. The later chapters are complemented by plates, with commentary and transcriptions. After an exposition of early medieval theoretical writing on plainchant, a historical survey follows the constantly changing nature of the repertory through from the earliest times to the restoration of medieval chant a century ago. The historical relations between Gregorian, Old-Roman, Milanese, Spanish, and otherrepertories is considered. Important musicians and centre of composition are discussed, together with the establishment of Gregorian chant in all the lands of medieval Europe, and the reformations andrevisions carried out by the religious orders and the humanists. Copiously illustrated with over 200 musical examples transcribed from original sources, the book highlights the diversity of practice and richness of the chant repertory characteristic of the Middle Ages. As both a self-contained summary and also, with its many pointers to further reading, a handbook for research, it will become an indispensable reference book on this vast subject.
Categories: Music