Type VII U Boats

Type VII U Boats

Left: Karl Diinitz, who did much to help establish the UBoat Service and was responsible for its direction during World War II. It was his drive and enthusiasm—in the face of bitter opposition at first from the 'big-gun' proponents ...

Author: Roger Chesneau

Publisher: Seaforth Publishing

ISBN: 9781848321236

Category: History

Page: 67

View: 489

The ‘ShipCraft’ series provides in-depth information about building and modifying model kits of famous warship types. Lavishly illustrated, each book takes the modeller through a brief history of the subject class, highlighting differences between sister-ships and changes in their appearance over their careers. This includes paint schemes and camouflage, featuring colour profiles and highly-detailed line drawings and scale plans. The modelling section reviews the strengths and weaknesses of available kits, lists commercial accessory sets for super-detailing of the ships, and provides hints on modifying and improving the basic kit. This is followed by an extensive photographic gallery of selected high-quality models in a variety of scales, and the book concludes with a section on research references – books, monographs, large-scale plans and websites. This volume is devoted to the largest class of submarines ever built, the Type VII, which formed the backbone of the German effort in the critical Battle of the Atlantic. A pre-war design, the Type VII was developed as the campaign progressed and was still in frontline service in 1945. All the major variants, as well as minor changes to equipment, are covered here. With its unparalleled level of visual information – paint schemes, models, line drawings and photographs – it is simply the best reference for any modelmaker setting out to build one of these famous boats.
Categories: History

U Boats at War in World War I and II

U Boats at War in World War I and II

Vesikko was built in Finland in 1933, and was essentially a coastal submarine, 133 ft 10 in. long with three torpedoes, a small gun and a submerged displacement of 300 tons. Vesikko was essentially the prototype of the Type II U-boat, ...

Author: Jon Sutherland

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781783038671

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 530

U Boats were the scourge of the seas for Allied shipping during both World Wars almost bringing Britain to the brink of starvation on several occasions. This book contains unseen photographs taken by German submarine crew and captains during each war.The World War One selection features a submariner's photos of U-25, an early German U-boat. They belonged to WO Friedrich Pohl who served on U-boats SM-25 and SMU-33. There are many photos of the U-boat itself, crew on deck and attacks on Norwegian merchant ships with the surface gun. U-25 was launched 12 July 1913, sank a total of 21 ships, 14,126 tons and surrendered to France 23 February 1919.The World War Two photos include images from an original WW2 U Boat commander's photo album. It belonged to Kapitan Leutnant Herbert Bruninghaus. As a U Boat navigator, he served on the famous U-38 under ace Heinrich Liebe. Herbert later went on to command three U Boats of his own - U-6, U-148 and U-1059. There are also original images from a Kriegmarine officer's photo album (unfortunately unnamed). It includes photos of Commander Prien's U-47 returning to Kiel after attacks at Scapa Flow.
Categories: History

Battle of the Atlantic 1939 41

Battle of the Atlantic 1939   41

The Germans used three major types of U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic between 1939 and 1941: Type II (in four variants), Type VII and Type IX. Additionally, they had several miscellaneous types: the Type IA, UA – a submarine built ...

Author: Mark Lardas

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472836014

Category: History

Page: 97

View: 309

At the start of World War II, few thought the U-boat would be as devastating as it proved to be. But convoys and sonar-equipped escorts proved inadequate to defend the Allies' merchantmen, and the RAF's only offensive weapon was the anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft. For RAF Coastal Command, the first two years of the war were the hardest. Although starved of resources, operating with outdated aircraft and often useless weaponry, they were still the only force that could take the fight to the U-boats. But in these two years, the RAF learned what it needed to win the Battle of the Atlantic. Gradually developing new tactics and technology, such as airborne radar, signals intelligence, and effective weaponry, the Allies ended 1941 in a position to defeat Dönitz's growing fleet of U-boats. This book, the first of two volumes, explains the fascinating history of how the RAF kept the convoys alive against the odds, and developed the force that would prevail in the climactic battles of 1942 and 1943.
Categories: History

History of the U Boot

History of the U Boot

Type II Dubbed Einbaum (dugout canoe) by their crews, the U-boats were the first type II class submarines built for the Kriegsmarine after the First World War. While the old prototype I (who would eventually evolved in U-Boat from great ...

Author: Kittel & Graf

Publisher: Edizioni R.E.I.

ISBN: 9782372971768

Category: History

Page: 170

View: 387

U-Boot is the German term to refer broadly to submarines, and is short for Unterseeboot, literally "submarine boat". The objectives of the U-boat campaigns in both wars were the convoys carrying supplies from the US to Europe. The term U-Boot, followed by a number, such as U-Boot 47 indicates a specific vessel, while U-Boot Type II a particular class, the only U-boats that can be considered true submarines, and submarines, are those that belong to the Type XXI and Type XXIII. During the Second World War, the attacks of the U-boats were the main component of the Battle of the North Eastern, which lasted until the end of the war. During the early stages of the war and immediately after the entry of the United States, the U-boats were extremely effective in the destruction of merchant allies. Improvements in tactical convoys, sonar, the depth charges, the deciphering of the Enigma code used by the Germans and the range of escort aircraft served to turn the fate against the U-boats. At the end of the U-boat fleet suffered extremely heavy losses, losing 789 units (three British submarines captured) of 1157 (of which 25 Allied captured) and about 30,000 sailors on a total of 50.000. The German U-boats and Japanese submarines and Italian sank around 2,828 Allied ships, for a total of about 15 million tons. Between 1939 and 1942 the U-boats also bombed the oil fields of Florida and Americans of many coastal areas causing extensive damage; when the British found a way to decipher Enigma allies were able to predict the movements, yet the Germans did not interrupt the use of U-boats in the Atlantic. During World War II, the Kriegsmarine (German Navy) produced different types of U-boats, as the technology improved. In this volume are indicated in detail the characteristics of all the classes of U-Boot, from Type I to Type XXIII, in addition to the history of the U-boats that made the protagonists during the Second World War.
Categories: History

The U Boat War

The U Boat War

These became the Type II, Type VII and Type I respectively. Raeder finally gave the order to begin assembly of the first six Type II U-boats on 8 February 1935, and after years of covert building, the Kriegsmarine replaced the ...

Author: Lawrence Paterson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472848260

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 192

The accepted historical narrative of the Second World War predominantly assigns U-boats to the so-called 'Battle of the Atlantic', almost as if the struggle over convoys between the new world and the old can be viewed in isolation from simultaneous events on land and in the air. This has become an almost accepted error. The U-boats war did not exist solely between 1940 and 1943, nor did the Atlantic battle occur in seclusion from other theatres of action. The story of Germany's second U-boat war began on the first day of hostilities with Britain and France and ended with the final torpedo sinking on 7 May 1945. U-boats were active in nearly every theatre of operation in which the Wehrmacht served, and within all but the Southern Ocean. Moreover, these deployments were not undertaken in isolation from one another; instead they were frequently interconnected in what became an increasingly inefficient German naval strategy. This fascinating new book places each theatre of action in which U-boats were deployed into the broader context of the Second World War in its entirety while also studying the interdependence of the various geographic deployments. It illustrates the U-boats' often direct relationship with land, sea and aerial campaigns of both the Allied and Axis powers, dispels certain accepted mythologies, and reveals how the ultimate failure of the U-boats stemmed as much from chaotic German military and industrial mismanagement as it did from Allied advances in code-breaking and weaponry.
Categories: History

First U Boat Flotilla

First U Boat Flotilla

Theoretical training included lessons in U-boat construction from the point of view of both sailor and engineer, ... An engine installation made up of half a Type II drive unit complete with submarine steering equipment completed the ...

Author: Lawrence Paterson

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473814264

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 598

Lawrence Paterson is an author and historian.
Categories: History

U Boats at War in 100 Objects 1939 1945

U Boats at War in 100 Objects  1939   1945

In time he would rise to the rank of Oberleutnant and IWO (First Officer), responsible for controlling torpedo aiming during attacks and generally supporting the commander. 3: ThE TypE II U-BOAT 3: The Type II U-Boat.

Author: Gordon Williamson

Publisher: Frontline Books

ISBN: 9781526759054

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 571

‘The only thing that ever really frightened me during the war was the U-boat peril,’ wrote Winston Churchill in his history of the Second World War. ‘I was even more anxious about this battle than I had been about the glorious air fight called the Battle of Britain.” In reality, the Kriegsmarine had been woefully unprepared for the war into which it was thrown. The Command-in-Chief of submarines, Karl Dönitz, himself a verteran U-boat captain from the First World War, felt that he could bring Britain to its knees with a fleet of 300 U-Boats. But when war broke out, he had just twenty-four available for operational use. Despite this, the U-Boat arm scored some incredible successes in the early part of the war, raising the status of the submarine commanders and crews to that of national heroes in the eyes of the German people. The ‘Grey Wolves’ had become super-stars. Small wonder then that the U-Boat war has fascinated students of military history ever since. This book, using a carefully selected range of both wartime images and colour images of surviving U-boat memorabilia from private collections, describes 100 iconic elements of the U-Boat service and its campaigns. The array of objects include important individuals and the major U-Boat types, through to the uniforms and insignias the men wore. The weapons, equipment and technology used are explored, as are the conditions in which the U-boat crews served, from cooking facilities and general hygiene down to the crude toilet facilities. Importantly, the enemy that they faced is also covered, examining the ship-borne and airborne anti-submarine weaponry utilised against the U-boats. The U-Boats began the war, though small in number, more than a match for the Allies and created carnage amongst merchant shipping as well as sinking several major warships. The pace of technological development, however, failed to match that of Allied anti-submarine warfare weaponry and the U-Bootwaffe was ultimately doomed to defeat but not before, at one point, coming close to bringing Britain to its knees.
Categories: History

Anti Submarine Warfare

Anti Submarine Warfare

The Germans them- selves, pleased with the design, later used it as the basis for the first of the new U-boats, the type IA. The eventual type II also had a troubled gestation period. The Finnish Navy wanted a small submarine ...

Author: David Owen

Publisher: Seaforth Publishing

ISBN: 9781844157037

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 193

The submarine was undoubtedly the most potent purely naval weapon of the twentieth century. In two world wars, enemy underwater campaigns were very nearly successful in thwarting Allied hopes of victory - indeed, annihilation of Japanese shipping by US Navy submarines is an indicator of what might have been. That the submarine was usually defeated is a hugely important story in naval history, yet this is the first book to treat the subject as a whole in a readable and accessible manner. It concerns individual heroism and devotion to duty, but also ingenuity, technical advances and originality of tactical thought. What developed was an endless battle between forces above and below the surface, where a successful innovation by one side eventually produces a counter-measure by the other in a lethal struggle for supremacy. Development was not a straight line: wrong ideas and assumptions led to defeat and disaster.
Categories: History

U Boat Attack Logs

U Boat Attack Logs

“tit I The business end of a Type-VIIC boat showing two of its five torpedo tubes. ... These were fired from bow tubes (Tubes 1, II and III in the Type Us, with a Tube IV in the Type-I, Type-VII and TypeIX boats) and from the stern ...

Author: Daniel Morgan

Publisher: Seaforth Publishing

ISBN: 9781848321182

Category: History

Page: 492

View: 316

During the Second World War over 250 Allied warships from a dozen navies were sent to the bottom by German U-boats. This ground-breaking study provides a detailed analysis of every sinking for which source material survives from both the Allied and the German sides, resulting in detailed treatment of the fate of 110 vessels, with the remainder summarised in an extensive appendix. Uniquely, each entry is built around a specialist translation of the relevant segment of the war diary (log) of the U-boat in question, taken directly from the surviving originals – remarkably, this represents the first large-scale publication of the U-boat war diaries in any language. The book offers a wealth of new information, not only with respect to the circumstances of the sinkings from both the Allied and German perspectives, but also to the technical environment in which they lived as well as the fate of the crews. The entries include background details on the vessels concerned and the men involved, with a selection of rare and carefully chosen photos from archives and collections around the world. Each entry is itself a compelling narrative, but is backed with a list of sources consulted, including documents, published works and websites. A decade in the making, this is probably the most important book on the U-boat war to be published for many a year
Categories: History

Kriegsmarine U boats 1939 45 1

Kriegsmarine U boats 1939   45  1

THE TYPE II The Type II was a natural enough progression from the UB coastal types of the Kaiserliche Marine in the First World War. Small, cheap and easy to build, they could be produced in a remarkably short time.

Author: Gordon Williamson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781780966144

Category: History

Page: 77

View: 973

This, the first of two volumes on Germany's World War II U-boats, traces their development from the early U-boats of the Kaiser's Navy, the prohibition on Germany having U-boats following the Armistice in 1918 and the subsequent Treaty of Versailles, the secret development of U-boats using a 'cover-firm' in Holland, culminating in the formation of the 1st U-boat Flotilla in 1935 with the modern Type II. The operational history section includes examples from the Classes Type VIIA, Type VIIB, VIID, VIIE and VIIF before concentrating on the mainstay of the U-boat arm, the Type VIIC. Comparisons are also made with the standard allied submarines, their strengths, weaknesses and U-boat tactics.
Categories: History