The Unconsoled

The Unconsoled

... Winifred Holtby Prize), An Artist of the Floating World (1986, Whitbread Book of the Year Award, Premio Scanno, shortlisted for the Booker Prize), The Remains of the Day (1989, winner of the Booker Prize), The Unconsoled (1995, ...

Author: Kazuo Ishiguro

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 9780571249367

Category: Fiction

Page: 544

View: 567

*Kazuo Ishiguro's new novel Klara and the Sun is now available* By the Nobel Prize-winning author of The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go Ryder, a renowned pianist, arrives in a Central European city he cannot identify for a concert he cannot remember agreeing to give. But then as he traverses a landscape by turns eerie and comical - and always strangely malleable, as a dream might be - he comes steadily to realise he is facing the most crucial performance of his life. Ishiguro's extraordinary and original study of a man whose life has accelerated beyond his control was met on publication by consternation, vilification - and the highest praise.
Categories: Fiction

The Unconsoled

The Unconsoled

The Unconsoled , starting with the title and continuing throughout the text , privileges indeterminacy and implies that a distinguishing characteristic of literature is its capacity to suggest meanings that are not easily translatable ...

Author: Nicole L. McCleese

Publisher:

ISBN: MSU:31293029568825

Category: Electronic dissertations

Page: 68

View: 385

Categories: Electronic dissertations

Kazuo Ishiguro

Kazuo Ishiguro

But if we return to your earlier description of The Unconsoled as some kind of representation of the mind or consciousness, for me that novel is something that I hadn't finished properly. The first three books were like a single project ...

Author: Sebastian Groes and Barry Lewis

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9780230345263

Category:

Page: 312

View: 970

Categories:

Children Of Silence

Children Of Silence

Can you believe it: Kazuo Ishiguro, The Unconsoled (New York: Knopf, 1995), p. 444. 2. the crisis I had come to assess: The Unconsoled, p. 289. 3. No sooner had I said this: The Unconsoled, p. 9. 4. Sophie's face", I found myself ...

Author: Michael Wood

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781448138166

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 531

In this absorbing series of essays Michael Wood probes and plays with the dilemmas of twentieth century fiction - the myth of lost paradise, lost certainties, the suspension between contrary ideals, the lure of fantasy, the quest for the silence beneath speech. Wood's net is cast wide, from fables to novels, and he takes due account of personal and political context and of wider cultural and critical currents, noting fiction's swerving resistance to `history'. A superb essay on Roland Barthes is juxtaposed with a dissection of Beckett's prose comedy; an investigation of three Cuban writers -Cortazar, Cabrera Infante and Arenas - is followed by illuminating essays on Milan Kundera and Italo Calvino. In the second half of the book, the exploration of time, form and fantasy, and of the break with modernism, continues in studies of Garcia Marquez, Toni Morrison, Angela Carter, Kazuo Ishiguro, Salman Rushdie, Paul Auster and Jeanette Winterson. Rich with pleasures, spiked with insights, provocative and satisfying, this is one of the most exciting explorations of contemporary literature in recent years.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Kazuo Ishiguro in a Global Context

Kazuo Ishiguro in a Global Context

Two essays on The Unconsoled may help unravel the intricate intimacy of strangers in Nocturnes. Gary Adelman holds that in the unspecified city of The Unconsoled, the traveling musician Ryder 'meets himself at every turn in characters ...

Author: Cynthia F. Wong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317109419

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 178

View: 311

Bringing together an international group of scholars, this collection offers a fresh assessment of Kazuo Ishiguro’s evolving significance as a contemporary world author. The contributors take on a range of the aesthetic and philosophical themes that characterize Ishiguro’s work, including his exploration of the self, family, and community; his narrative constructions of time and space; and his assessments of the continuous and discontinuous forces of history, art, human psychology, and cultural formations. Significantly, the volume attends to Ishiguro’s own self-identification as an international writer who has at times expressed his uneasiness with being grouped together with British novelists of his generation. Taken together, these rich considerations of Ishiguro’s work attest to his stature as a writer who continues to fascinate cultural and textual critics from around the world.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Contemporary Fiction Celebrity Culture and the Market for Modernism

Contemporary Fiction  Celebrity Culture  and the Market for Modernism

Ishiguro's primary intentions in writing The Unconsoled was to move directly away from psychological realism, so when readers look for the temporal and spatial distortions he develops in order to make them affirm some agreed-upon ...

Author: Carey Mickalites

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350248571

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 279

Arguing that contemporary celebrity authors like Zadie Smith, Ian McEwan, Martin Amis, Kazuo Ishiguro, Salman Rushdie, Eimear McBride and Anna Burns position their work and public personae within a received modernist canon to claim and monetize its cultural capital in the lucrative market for literary fiction, this book also shows how the corporate conditions of marketing and branding have redefined older models of literary influence and innovation. It contributes to a growing body of criticism focused on contemporary literature as a field in which the formal and stylistic experimentation that came to define a canon of early 20th-century modernism has been renewed, contested, and revised. Other critics have celebrated these renewals, variously arguing that contemporary literature picks up on modernism's unfinished aesthetic revolutions in ways that have expanded the imaginative possibilities for fiction and revived questions of literary autonomy in the wake of postmodern nihilism. While this is a compelling thesis, and one that rightly questions an artificial and problematic periodization that still lingers in academic criticism, those approaches generally fail to address the material conditions that structure literary production and the generation of cultural capital, whether in the historical development of modernism or its contemporary permutations. This book addresses this absence by proposing a materialist history of modernism's afterlives.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Identity and Form in Contemporary Literature

Identity and Form in Contemporary Literature

It is therefore unsurprising that the novel that has proved most divisive among readers and critics is titled The Unconsoled. Boasting an omniscient yet unaware first person narrator, The Unconsoled is a radically experimental novel ...

Author: Ana María Sánchez-Arce

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136758003

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 276

View: 672

This ambitious and wide-ranging essay collection analyses how identity and form intersect in twentieth- and twenty-first century literature. It revises and deconstructs the binary oppositions identity-form, content-form and body-mind through discussions of the role of the author in the interpretation of literary texts, the ways in which writers bypass or embrace identity politics and the function of identity and the body in form. Essays tackle these issues from a number of positions, including identity categories such as (dis)ability, gender, race and sexuality, as well as questioning these categories themselves. Essayists look at both identity as form and form as identity. Although identity and form are both staples of current research on contemporary literature, they rarely meet in the way this collection allows. Authors studied include Beryl Bainbridge, Samuel Beckett, John Berryman, Brigid Brophy, Angela Carter, J.M. Coetzee, Anne Enright, William Faulkner, Mark Haddon, Ted Hughes, Kazuo Ishiguro, B.S. Johnson, A.L. Kennedy, Toby Litt, Hilary Mantel, Andrea Levy, Robert Lowell, Ian McEwan, Flannery O’Connor, Alice Oswald, Sylvia Plath, Jeremy Reed, Anne Sexton, Edith Sitwell, Wallace Stevens, Jeremy Reed, Jeanette Winterson and Virginia Woolf. The book engages with key theoretical approaches to twentieth- and twenty-first century literature of the last twenty years while at the same time advancing new frameworks that enable readers to reconsider the identity and form conundrum. In both its choice of texts and diverse approaches, it will be of interest to those working on English and American Literatures, gender studies, queer studies, disability studies, postcolonial literature, and literature and philosophy.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Narrative Unreliability in the Twentieth Century First Person Novel

Narrative Unreliability in the Twentieth Century First Person Novel

Mr. Ryder, the narrator of The Unconsoled, is a famous pianist who visits an unnamed Mid-European city to give a recital and, as it turns out, to help people solve their personal and cultural crises. After a few pages already, ...

Author: Elke D'hoker

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110209389

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 897

This volume deals with the occurrence and development of unreliable first-person narration in twentieth century Western literature. The different articles in this collection approach this topic both from the angle of literary theory and through a detailed reading of literary texts. By addressing questions concerning the functions, characteristics and types of unreliability, this collection contributes to the current theoretical debate about unreliable narration. At the same time, the collection highlights the different uses to which unreliability has been put in different contexts, poetical traditions and literary movements. It does so by tracing the unreliable first-person narrator in a variety of texts from Dutch, German, American, British, French, Italian, Polish, Danish and Argentinean literature. In this way, this volume significantly extends the traditional ‘canon’ of narrative unreliability. This collection combines essays from some of the foremost theoreticians of unreliability (James Phelan, Ansgar Nünning) with essays from experts in different national traditions. The result is a collection that approaches the ‘case’ of narrative unreliability from a new and more varied perspective.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Kazuo Ishiguro

Kazuo Ishiguro

Footballers and Film Actors in The Unconsoled RICHARD ROBINSON Chapter Summary: The Unconsoled (1995) draws many of the names for minor figures from footballers who have played in the World Cup finals and from characters in Josef von ...

Author: Sean Matthews

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441100580

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 168

View: 870

Kazuo Ishiguro is one of the finest and most accomplished contemporary writers of his generation. The short story author, television writer and novelist, included twice in Granta's list of Best Young British Writers, has over the past twenty-five years produced a body of work which is just as critically-acclaimed as it is popular with the general public. Like the writings of Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro's work is concerned with creating discursive platforms for issues of class, ethics, ethnicity, nationhood, place, gender and the uses and problems surrounding artistic representation. As a Japanese immigrant who came to Great Britain in 1960, Ishiguro has used his unique position and fine intellectual abilities to contemplate what it means to be British in the contemporary era. This guide traces the main themes throughout Ishiguro's writing whilst it also pays attention to his short stories and writing for television. It includes a new interview with the author, a preface by Haruki Murakami and discussion of James Ivory's adaptation of The Remains of the Day.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Novels of Kazuo Ishiguro

The Novels of Kazuo Ishiguro

n his fourth novel, The Unconsoled (1995), Ishiguro attempts a work that at first glance differs from his earlier novels in almost every conceivable respect. Ostensibly, it recounts the visit of an internationally acclaimed concert ...

Author: Matthew Beedham

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137194015

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 851

One of the most popular contemporary authors, Kazuo Ishiguro has so far produced six highly regarded novels which have won him international acclaim and honours, including the Booker Prize, the Whitbread Award and an OBE for Services to Literature. This Reader's Guide: • evaluates the various responses to Ishiguro's work, beginning with initial reactions, moving on to key scholarly criticism, and taking note along the way of what Ishiguro has offered • discusses each of Ishiguro's novels, from A Pale View of the Hills (1982) to Never Let Me Go (2005) • features three in-depth chapters on Ishiguro's Booker Prize-winning The Remains of the Day (1993) • analyses reviews, interviews and scholarly essays and articles in order to situate the novels in the context of Ishiguro's ouevre • explores themes and issues which are central to the author's fiction, such as narration, ethics and memory. Lucid and insightful, this is an indispensable introductory guide for anyone studying – or simply interested in - the work of this major novelist.
Categories: Literary Criticism