The Victorian Town Child

The Victorian Town Child

Horn examines their lifestyles and attitudes to them.

Author: Pamela Horn

Publisher: Alan Sutton Publishing

ISBN: 0750920203

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 288

As 19th-century Britain became increasingly urban and industrialized, the number of children living in towns grew rapidly. At the same time, urban society itself became increasingly divided, as rich and poor became more segregated. The difference between the well-off children of the smart town houses and the poor children of the slums, in their dress, education and activities, was all too obvious.
Categories: History

The Victorian Town Child

The Victorian Town Child

At the start of Victoria's reign most parents wanted their children to learn to read , but by the middle of the century ... the register when they married , dropped sharply from 48 per cent for those marrying in 72 THE VICTORIAN TOWN CHILD.

Author: Pamela Horn

Publisher: Sutton Pub Limited

ISBN: UVA:X004053712

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 523

The rise of urban society saw a great majority of people living in towns at the end of the 19th century and, in industrial centres, the proportion of children was well above the national average. Horn examines their lifestyles and attitudes to them.
Categories: Social Science

The Industrious Child Worker

The Industrious Child Worker

4 Pamela Horn, The Victorian Town Child (Stroud, 1997), pp. 203–04. 5 Peter Higginbotham, Children's Homes: A History of Institutional Care for Britain's Young (Barnsley, 2017), p. 229; Michelle Cale, 'Saved from a Life of Vice and ...

Author: Mary Nejedly

Publisher: Univ of Hertfordshire Press

ISBN: 9781912260478

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 101

Studies of child labour have examined the experiences of child workers in agriculture, mining and textile mills, yet surprisingly little research has focused on child labour in manufacturing towns. This book investigates the extent and nature of child labour in Birmingham and the West Midlands, from the mid-eighteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century. It considers the economic contributions of child workers under the age of 14 and the impact of early work on their health and education. Child labour in the region was not a short-lived stage of the early Industrial Revolution but an integral part of industry throughout the nineteenth century. Parents regarded their children as potentially valuable contributors to the family economy, encouraging families to migrate from rural areas so that their children could work from an early age in the manufacture of pins, nails, buttons, glass, locks and guns as well as tin-plating, carpet-weaving, brass-casting and other industries. The demand for young workers in Birmingham was greater than that for adults; in Mary Nejedly's detailed analysis the importance of children's earnings to the family economy becomes clear, as well as the role played by child workers in industrialisation itself. In view of the economic benefit of children's labour to families as well as employers, both children's education and health could and did suffer.As well as working at harmful processes that produced dangerous fumes and dust or exposed them to poisonous substances, children also suffered injuries in the workplace, mainly to the head, eyes and fingers, and were often subjected to ill-treatment from adult workers. The wide gulf in economic circumstances that existed between the families of skilled workers and those of unskilled workers, unemployed workers or single-parent families also becomes evident.Attitudes towards childhood changed over the course of the period, however, with a greater emphasis being placed on the role of education for all children as a means of reducing pauperism and dependence on the poor rate. Concerns about health also gradually emerged, together with laws to limit work for children both by age and hours worked. Mary Nejedly's clear-eyed research sheds fresh light on the life of working children and increases our knowledge of an important aspect of social and economic history.
Categories: History

Policing the Victorian Town

Policing the Victorian Town

with concealing the death of a baby boy. She pleaded guilty to the charge, but being both homeless and friendless and with the promise of assistance from Reverend Rowland of St Peter's, Middlesbrough, she was given a sentence of only 7 ...

Author: D. Taylor

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230535817

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 680

The book looks at the development of policing in a town noted for its high levels of crime. Through a detailed study of policing and police work over the period c. 1840-1914 it shows how the turbulent community of the early Victorian years was turned into a policed society by the end of the century.
Categories: History

Dining with the Victorians

Dining with the Victorians

Guilmant, A., Victorian and Edwardian Kent (Amberley Publishing Limited, 2013). Hamilton, J., Thomas Cook: The ... Horn, P., The Victorian Town Child (Sutton Publishing, Gloucestershire, 1997). Horn, P., Pleasures and Pastimes in ...

Author: Emma Kay

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 9781445646558

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 370

Journey through Britain’s food history and discover the fascinating, gruesome and wonderful culinary traditions of the Victorians.
Categories: History

The Victorian Baby in Print

The Victorian Baby in Print

... year he had been absent from London had prevented him from acquiring the curious ready local instinct of the true town child , and he had been so much guarded and watched that he was likely to be utterly at a loss when left alone .

Author: Tamara S. Wagner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192599988

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 520

The Victorian Baby in Print: Infancy, Infant Care, and Nineteenth-Century Popular Culture explores the representation of babyhood in Victorian Britain. The first study to focus exclusively on the baby in nineteenth-century literature and culture, this critical analysis discusses the changing roles of an iconic figure. A close look at the wide-ranging portrayal of infants and infant care not only reveals how divergent and often contradictory Victorian attitudes to infancy really were, but also challenges persistent clichés surrounding the literary baby that emerged or were consolidated at the time, and which are largely still with us. Drawing on a variety of texts, including novels by Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Mrs Henry Wood, and Charlotte Yonge, as well as parenting magazines of the time, childrearing manuals, and advertisements, this study analyses how their representations of infancy and infant care utilised and shaped an iconography that has become definitional of the Victorian age itself. The familiar clichés surrounding the Victorian baby have had a lasting impact on the way we see both the Victorians and babies, and a critical reconsideration might also prompt a self-critical reconsideration of the still burgeoning market for infant care advice today.
Categories: History

The Victorian World Facts and Fictions

The Victorian World  Facts and Fictions

Promises Broken: Courtship, Class, and Gender in Victorian England. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of ... The Persistence of Victorian Liberalism: The Politics of Social Reform in Britain, 1870–1900. ... The Victorian Town Child.

Author: Ginger S. Frost

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440855917

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 732

An introduction to the myths and realities of the history of Victorian Britain, with accompanying primary sources. • Corrects nine myths about the Victorian era, with explanations of why these myths began • Includes over 50 primary documents from a wide variety of genres • Covers all classes of Victorian life, featuring the voices of women, children, the poor, and racial minorities • Offers a nontraditional approach to studying Victorian Britain • Provides a starting point for discussions about historical memory and historiography, and the differences between myth, memory, and history
Categories: History

The Empire Strikes Back

The Empire Strikes Back

... Methods and Public Opinion« in P. McCann (ed.), Popular Education and Socialization in the Nineteenth Century (1977), p. 233. 144. A. Davin, Growing Up Poor, pp. 170, 208¥14; Horn, The Victorian Town Child, pp. 12¥13; J. Stewart, ...

Author: Andrew S. Thompson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317873884

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 950

`The Empire Strikes Back' will inject the empire back into the domestic history of modern Britain. In the nineteenth century and for much of the twentieth century, Britain's empire was so large that it was truly the global superpower. Much of Africa, Asia and America had been subsumed. Britannia's tentacles had stretched both wide and deep. Culture, Religion, Health, Sexuality, Law and Order were all impacted in the dominated countries. `The Empire Strikes Back' shows how the dependent states were subsumed and then hit back, affecting in turn England itself.
Categories: History

The New Handbook of Children s Rights

The New Handbook of Children s Rights

(1989) “Children's Rights: Developments and Prospects” Children and Society vol. ... Penguin, London Horn, P. (1997) The Victorian Town Child, Sutton Publishing, Gloucestershire Hoyles, M. (1979) Changing Childhood, Writers and Readers, ...

Author: Bob Franklin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134576913

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 249

The new edition of this well established handbook provides up-to-date information on a topic of increasing importance across a range of disciplines and practices. It covers: * the debate concerning children's rights and developments in rights provision over the last twenty years * the impact of recent British legislation on children's rights in key areas such as education, social and welfare services and criminal justice * the key provisions of the UN Convention and Human Rights Act * recent policy proposals and initiatives in the British setting intended to establish and promote rights for children and young people * the rights claims of particular groups of children, for example children who are carers or children who are disabled * children's claims for particular rights such as the right to space, to sex education and citizenship * the ways in which the voices of children and young people are or might be articulated more clearly in policy debates and other arenas * issues and developments in Europe, Scandinavia and China. The New Handbook of Children's Rights offers a comprehensive and radical appraisal of the field which will be invaluable to students and professionals alike.
Categories: Social Science

Romantic Echoes in the Victorian Era

Romantic Echoes in the Victorian Era

... Hard Work in Factories and Mines: The Economics of Child Labour during the British Industrial Revolution (Boulder: Westview Press, 1999); see Pamela Horn, The Victorian Town Child (London: Sutton, 1997); see Hugh Cunningham, ...

Author: Andrew Radford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351902472

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 650

In tracing those deliberate and accidental Romantic echoes that reverberate through the Victorian age into the beginning of the twentieth century, this collection acknowledges that the Victorians decided for themselves how to define what is 'Romantic'. The essays explore the extent to which Victorianism can be distinguished from its Romantic precursors, or whether it is possible to conceive of Romanticism without the influence of these Victorian definitions. Romantic Echoes in the Victorian Era reassesses Romantic literature's immediate cultural and literary legacy in the late nineteenth century, showing how the Victorian writings of Matthew Arnold, Wilkie Collins, the Brontës, the Brownings, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Thomas Hardy, and the Rossettis were instrumental in shaping Romanticism as a cultural phenomenon. Many of these Victorian writers found in the biographical, literary, and historical models of Chatterton, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and Wordsworth touchstones for reappraising their own creative potential and artistic identity. Whether the Victorians affirmed or revolted against the Romanticism of their early years, their attitudes towards Romantic values enriched and intensified the personal, creative, and social dilemmas described in their art. Taken together, the essays in this collection reflect on current critical dialogues about literary periodisation and contribute to our understanding of how these contemporary debates stem from Romanticism's inception in the Victorian age.
Categories: Literary Criticism