The Person Centred Approach to Therapeutic Change

The Person Centred Approach to Therapeutic Change

Rogers ' theory of change does not propose a stage - by - stage process from one fixed state to a new and ... many of his ideas regarding developmental changes through counselling in 1951 , in Client - Centered Therapy ( particularly ...

Author: Michael McMillan

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 0761948694

Category: Psychology

Page: 104

View: 387

From the Foreword `It is an honour to be asked to write a foreword for this new book by Michael McMillan. I have been excited about this book ever since I read early drafts of its first two chapters some time ago at the birth of the project. At different times thereafter I have read other parts and my consistent impression has been that this is an author who has both a sophisticated academic understanding of the material and a great skill in communicating that widely. Those two qualities do not often go together! The book is about change. After a first chapter in which the author introduces us to the person-centred concept of the person, chapter two is devoted to the change process within the client, including a very accessible description of Rogers' process model. Chapter three goes on to explore why and how change occurs in the human being, while chapter four introduces the most up-to-date person-centred theory in relation to the nature of the self concept and its changing process. Chapters five and six explore why change occurs in therapy and the conditions that facilitate that change, while chapter seven looks beyond the core conditions to focus on the particular quality of presence, begging the question as to whether this is a transpersonal/transcendental quality or an intense experiencing of the core conditions themselves. This is an intensely modern book particularly in its postmodern emphasis. Rogers is sometimes characterised as coming from modernist times but he can also be seen as one of the early post modernists in his emphasis on process more than outcome and relationship more than personal striving. The modern nature of the book is also emphasised by a superb analysis of the relationship between focussing and person-centred therapy in Chapter five, linking also with Polanyi's notion of indwelling in this and other chapters. In suggesting that in both focussing and person-centred therapy the therapist is inviting the client to 'indwell' himself or herself, the author provides a framework for considering many modern perceptions of the approach including notions such as 'presence' and ' relational depth'. Also, the link with focussing is modern in the sense that the present World Association for the approach covers a fairly broad family including traditional person-centred therapists, experiential therapists, focussing-oriented therapists and process-guiding therapists. Important in this development is the kind of dialogue encouraged by the present book' - Dave Mearns, Strathclyde University The belief that change occurs during the therapeutic process is central to all counselling and psychotherapy. The Person-Centred Approach to Therapeutic Change examines how change can be facilitated by the counsellor offering empathy, unconditional positive regard and congruence. The Person-Centred Approach to Therapeutic Change outlines the main theoretical cornerstones of the person-centred approach and then, applying these, describes why change occurs as a result of a person-centred therapeutic encounter. The author explores the counselling relationship as an environment in which clients can open themselves up to experiences they have previously found difficult to acknowledge and to move forward. Integral to the person-centred approach is Carl Rogers' radical view that change should be seen as an ongoing process rather than an alteration from one fixed state to another. In Rogers' view psychological health is best achieved by the person who is able to remain in a state of continual change. Such a person is open to all experiences and is therefore able to assimilate and adapt to new experiences, whether 'good' or 'bad'. By focusing explicitly on how change is theorized and facilitated in counselling, this book goes to the heart of person-centred theory and practice, making it essential reading for trainees and practitioners alike.
Categories: Psychology

Principles of Therapeutic Change that Work

Principles of Therapeutic Change that Work

apeutic personality change (Rogers, 1957),positive regard (Farber & Lane, 2001, 2002) and congruence or ... Therapeutic change is most likely when therapists strive to regard their anxiety disordered clients positively and to be ...

Author: Louis G. Castonguay

Publisher: Oxford Clinical Psychology

ISBN: 9780195156843

Category: Psychology

Page: 417

View: 811

Presenting the findings of the Joint Presidential Task Force of the Society of Clinical Psychology & of the North American Society for Psychotherapy Research, this book recommends over 60 principles for applying treatments to four problem areas: depression, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, & substance abuse disorders.
Categories: Psychology

The Rational Emotive Behavioural Approach to Therapeutic Change

The Rational Emotive Behavioural Approach to Therapeutic Change

It is this consistency and coherence that helps to facilitate psycho- therapeutic change . 5 Your client commits himself to achieving these goals It is one thing to identify realistic goals for change , but another thing to commit ...

Author: Windy Dryden

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 0761948961

Category: Psychology

Page: 164

View: 729

Change' is at the heart of Counselling and Psychotherapy. Clients enter into the therapeutic process in the hope that something in themselves or their situation will be different by the end. Counsellors and Psychotherapists therefore need to understand the nature of change and how best to facilitate it.
Categories: Psychology

Therapeutic Change

Therapeutic Change

process or whether the differences in the nature of therapeutic change indicate that these two different types of patients come to therapy with different problems, needs, and expectations, and therefore experience the therapeutic ...

Author: Sidney J. Blatt

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781489910103

Category: Psychology

Page: 300

View: 386

Dynamic psychotherapy research has become revitalized, especially in the last three decades. This major study by Sidney Blatt, Richard Ford, and their associates evaluates long-term intensive treatment (hospital ization and 4-times-a-week psychotherapy) of very disturbed patients at the Austen Riggs Center. The center provides a felicitous setting for recovery-beautiful buildings on lovely wooded grounds just off the quiet main street of the New England town of Stockbridge, Massa chusetts. The center, which has been headed in succession by such capable leaders as Robert Knight, Otto Will, Daniel Schwartz, and now Edward Shapiro, has been well known for decades for its type of inten sive hospitalization and psychotherapy. Included in its staff have been such illustrious contributors as Erik Erikson, David Rapaport, George Klein, and Margaret Brenman. The Rapaport-Klein study group has been meeting there yearly since Rapaport's death in 1960. Although the center is a long-term care treatment facility, it remains successful and solvent even in these days of increasingly short-term treatment. Sidney Blatt, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at Yale Univer sity, and Richard Ford of the Austen Riggs Center, and their associates assembled a sample of 90 patients who had been in long-term treatment and who had been given (initially and at 15 months) a set of psychologi cal tests, including the Rorschach, the Thematic Apperception Test, a form of the Wechsler Intelligence Test, and the Human Figure Drawings.
Categories: Psychology

The Psychodynamic Approach to Therapeutic Change

The Psychodynamic Approach to Therapeutic Change

personal growth and therapeutic change are all seen as crucially dependent on this interplay. In the subsequent chapters of this book we will assume the existence of this emerging convergence of perspectives while also drawing on the ...

Author: Rob Leiper

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781446231319

Category: Psychology

Page: 192

View: 158

`It is well written and well organised and I'm sure it will be of help and interest to researchers and practitioners concerned with the therapeutic action of psychodynamic treatment' - Penelope Waite, Nurturing Potential Change is the central purpose of all counselling and psychotherapy, but how it is conceptualized and worked with varies according to the theoretical approach being used. The Psychodynamic Approach to Therapeutic Change explores the nature of psychological change from the psychodynamic perspective and describes the process through which clients can be helped to come to terms with painful experiences and develop new ways of relating. In the first part of the book, Rob Leiper and Michael Maltby look at therapeutic change in relation to psychological health and maturity. They explore what motivates people to change and also why resistance occurs. The main part of the book outlines the collaborative process that clients and therapist work through to bring about change and highlights the role of the therapist in: ] creating the conditions for clients to express their thoughts, feelings and memories ] developing clients' awareness and understanding of their psychological processes, and ] providing `containment' for the client's psychological projections. The final part of the book sets personal therapeutic change in a wider social context, linking individual change with community and organisational development. Combining core psychodynamic concepts with contemporary thinking, The Psychodynamic Approach to Therapeutic Change provides a lively and up-to-date integration of ideas on the change process which will be of great value to trainees and practicing counsellors and psychotherapists.
Categories: Psychology

The Logic of Therapeutic Change

The Logic of Therapeutic Change

The objective of any strategic therapy built with advanced technology is to produce this therapeutic change as soon as possible: a change in perception that changes the reaction, which in turn will also modify behaviour and cognition.

Author: Elisa Balbi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429921339

Category: Psychology

Page: 178

View: 611

In 1993 the authors published The Art of Change: Strategic Therapy and Hypnotherapy Without Trance, a revolutionary work that introduced a series of effective clinical strategies to create therapeutic change, even in seemingly impossible cases. In his new book, the author performs another quantum leap, leading his readers to a more operative knowledge of the precise logic of therapeutic change. Most intimidating mental disorders are based on perceptions of reality that when using an ordinary 'common-sense' logic as our reading lens, look as if they are irrational, bizarre, illogical and therefore hard to understand and manage.
Categories: Psychology

Perspectives on Individual Differences Affecting Therapeutic Change in Communication Disorders

Perspectives on Individual Differences Affecting Therapeutic Change in Communication Disorders

For example, some individuals assume they will participate in therapy that uses the medical model as a framework. Thus, they expect clinicians to provide answers for their problems and tell them what changes they need to make.

Author: Amy L. Weiss

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9781136950148

Category: Psychology

Page: 314

View: 317

This volume examines the ramifications of individual differences in therapy outcomes for a wide variety of communication disorders. In an era where evidence-based practice is the clinical profession's watchword, each chapter attacks this highly relevant issue from a somewhat different perspective. In some areas of communication disorders, considering the variance brought by the client into the therapeutic 'mix' has a healthy history, whereas in others the notion of how individual client profiles mesh with therapy outcomes has rarely been considered. Through the use of research results, case study descriptions and speculation, the contributors have creatively woven what we know and what we have yet to substantiate into an interesting collection of summaries useful for therapy programming and designing clinical research.
Categories: Psychology

Guiding the Process of Therapeutic Change

Guiding the Process of Therapeutic Change

hierarchical analyses of, 181-183 in vivo training of, 266-267 laboratory research and static models of, 15 lack of support for, 198 mood and, 323-324 prediction of, 176-177 relationships affected by changes in, 259 repetitive patterns ...

Author: Frederick H. Kanfer

Publisher: Research PressPub

ISBN: UOM:39015016177977

Category: Behavior modification

Page: 454

View: 892

Bridges the gap between the literature on therapy and what actually transpires in clinical practice. The book presents a seven-phase model for managing the complete clinical change process from initial contact through termination. It addresses issues, such as the therapeutic interview, therapist-client relationship, therapist's personal style, clients' motivation and self-regulatory skills, and flexibility in selecting and implementing treatment strategies.
Categories: Behavior modification

Therapeutic and Everyday Discourse as Behavior Change

Therapeutic and Everyday Discourse as Behavior Change

Almost no relevant work on the phase dynamics of therapeutic changes are available . The main reason for this is that long - term change processes are difficult to study experimentally . Therefore , factorial research designs are ...

Author: Jurg Siegfried

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0893919195

Category: Psychology

Page: 560

View: 299

Categories: Psychology

Brain Change Therapy Clinical Interventions for Self Transformation

Brain Change Therapy  Clinical Interventions for Self Transformation

Change. Therapy. Early in life we all learn that there are important differences between thoughts, words, and deeds. As very small children, we quickly realize that our thoughts are our own private business; that our words can get us ...

Author: Carol Kershaw

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393708080

Category: Psychology

Page: 368

View: 423

Helping clients control their own emotional reactivity. When conditions like anxiety and depression are experienced chronically, they condition neural pathways and shape a person’s perception of and response to life events. As these pathways are reinforced, unhealthy neural networks turn on with increasing ease in the presence of conscious and unconscious triggers. In this groundbreaking book, Kershaw and Wade present Brain Change Therapy (BCT), a therapeutic protocol in which clients learn to manage their emotions and behaviors, and thus reduce stress and control emotional reactivity. Drawing from the latest neuroscientific research as well as integrative principles from hypnosis, biofeedback, and cognitive therapy, BCT helps clients reach stable neurological and emotional states and thus shift perspectives, attitudes, beliefs, and personal narratives toward the positive. BCT starts with the working assumption that effective therapeutic change must inevitably include a repatterning of neural pathways, and employs “self-directed neuroplasticity” through the active practicing of focused attention. As an adjunct to these methods, it helps clients create new, empowering life experiences that can serve as the basis for new neural patterns. The book begins by laying the foundation for body–mind and brain–body interventions by exploring the basics of the brain: its anatomy, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, electrochemical processes, and the rhythms of the brain and body and nature. The authors set forth a detailed protocol for neuroassessment and evaluation of new clients, with particular attention to assessing a client’s habitually activated emotional circuits, neural imprints, state flexibility, level of arousal, and any relevant neurobiological conditions. The authors go on to outline BCT and its interventions geared toward stress reduction and state change, or the capacity to shift the mind from one emotional state to another and to shift the brain from one neural pattern to another. Protocols for specific presenting problems, such as fear, anxiety, and life-threatening and chronic illnesses are outlined in detail. Because of the breadth of the BCT approach, it is effective in working with individuals who are interested in shifting and conditioning peak performance states of consciousness, and the authors offer protocols for helping their clients reach peak professional performance as well. With this book, clinicians will be able to empower their clients to find their way out of a wide range of debilitating mental states.
Categories: Psychology