Light and truth triumphant or G Keith s imagined Magick of Quakerism confirmed utterly confounded and confronted by his own and divers authors testimonies collected in an appendix etc

Light and truth triumphant  or  G  Keith s imagined Magick of Quakerism confirmed  utterly confounded and confronted by his own and divers     authors testimonies collected in an appendix  etc

Wonderful Magician ! or rather , Confrised Imaginary , Inviduous Hypocrite ! where Envy ts , there is Confusion ... either with Bodily Pain , or Death : Which are matters of Fact and highly Criminal ; and by his own Evidence allo : We ...

Author: George Whitehead

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0019507471

Category:

Page:

View: 658

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Imagined Truths

Imagined Truths

It's about what we remember and what we imagine, what I call here our imagined truths. My experiences are no different from most people of my generation. My beliefs were based on my memories, more accurately how I perceived the world ...

Author: Bryant Griffith

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789460916632

Category: Education

Page: 95

View: 110

Education is often envisioned as a linear, one-way, cause-and-effect process, with teaching as the cause, learning as the effect. But the relationships are less tidy, less passive, and more cyclical than that. There is a continuous cycle of inquiry, discovery, and integration, leading to further inquiry. Technology facilitates the exchange of information, not just teacher to student, but student to teacher, and student to student. The result is that the nature of the development of learning, knowledge, and even wisdom becomes more transparent. This presents challenges of method and identity for the teacher, but more importantly, it enforces a sense among students of their critical investment in their own education. Teachers and learners need to contemplate why and how they construct knowledge. An essential part of this reflection is questioning the premises that govern our views of the world, as well as the premises of what is presented as knowledge. This demands a new epistemology, and requires that teachers change their conceptual structures and recognize that all theories of knowledge are not founded solely on formal logic using uninterpreted experience as data. Moreover, it demands that new models be considered as ways of making sense and of understanding. As teachers, we realize that learning how to cope with changes of this magnitude requires leadership where relationships are crucial. The rapidly emerging significance of social networks is reshaping our world, a world that isn’t flat but where spiky concentrations of people work together to make things happen creatively. It is more the case that the education we need to provide is to solve problems we can’t conceive. Our cultural narratives, when freed of the bounds of instrumental learning, become powerful tools for an emerging world where questions and answers are not simple, cause and effect equations. Yes, the teacher is a facilitator, but one with the mastery of sufficient material to be able to paint numerous contexts for the learner. We need to be open, attentive, and anticipatory to that which may surprise us, to that which we will not expect. The shape of past knowledge can be discovered by reflecting on the ways in which we make decisions and by asking why questions. These questions frame intentions and focus on the specific process of knowing why and how ideas have changed from the past to the present. By placing the self in the middle, this process becomes a trialectic of relational thought which in turns becomes the dialectic of learning.
Categories: Education

Imagined Truths

Imagined Truths

Conclusion To bring this Introduction to a close, we wish to acknowledge that Imagined Truths is inspired by the work of Harriet Turner, who has devoted her entire career to the exploration of how texts create the illusion of reality ...

Author: Mary Coffey

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781487505172

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 416

View: 963

Written by the foremost specialists in the field of contemporary Spanish letters, the essays in Imagined Truths provide an analysis of stylistic and philosophical manifestations of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Spanish literary realism.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Relationship

Relationship

Whose truth wins – the truth you imagine or the imagined outcome the other person steadfastly refuses to consider? The printer qua homespun philosopher Elbert Hubbard reportedly made this observation: “Of all the illusions that beset ...

Author: Lee Thayer

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781524599652

Category: Self-Help

Page: 204

View: 595

This book is about all of the kinds of relationships people can have. It is a very insightful book about how relationships emerge. But it is also about how indispensable they are to our ongoing sense of being who we are in the worlds we inhabit. We have relationships with various people. But we also have relationships with our possessions, with our pets, and with our pens and car keys. We have relationships with the foods we eat, the places we go, and the diversions we take. We have relationships with the news we attend to, the gossip we consume, and the places we are familiar with. We have relationships with our clothes, our lotions and potions, our grooming equipment, our computers and our snow shovels. Taken together, all of the relationships we have had, have today, and will have in the future attach us to our worlds in an admixture of pushes and pulls on our attention and our behavior. Metaphorically, it might visually look much like an intricate circular spider web, with us individually stuck at the core. We use the singular relationship here because we want to explore what it is that all relationships have in common: relationship. Relationships are sticky. They are far easier to fall into than to escape from. They are often demanding, requiring our attention when we wanted to devote our attention elsewhere. The drama of misplaced keys or a balky computer can take over our lives. We have hopes for certain relationships. We can be disappointed in how they turn out. But most of the myriad relationships that affect our lives just sort of happen. If they dont serve our purposes as we think we deserve, we drop them. A piece of clothing that just doesnt look right in the light can be dropped. Thats something you cant do with your own baby. You have a relationship with your body. If youre rich, you can get a remodeling job. If youre not, you may be stuck with the body youve got. Some relationships bring us down. Other relationships lift us up. In this book, you will learn how to create the kinds of relationships you need to get to where you want to go. The relationship you have with yourself is key. This book reveals to you how, if you get that right, most of the other relationships you live in, and by, will fall into place.
Categories: Self-Help

Climate Fiction and Cultural Analysis

Climate Fiction and Cultural Analysis

(478) According to Latour, it is in other words not about choosing one of the two sides of the modern Constitution – that is choosing between a science that is imagined to speak of facts unmediated (free from construction) and a science ...

Author: Gregers Andersen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000710137

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 154

View: 864

Climate Fiction and Cultural Analysis argues that the popularity of the term "climate fiction" has paradoxically exhausted the term’s descriptive power and that it has developed into a black box containing all kinds of fictions which depict climatic events and has consequently lost its true significance. Aware of the prospect of ecological collapse as well as our apparent inability to avert it, we face geophysical changes of drastic proportions that severely challenge our ability to imagine the consequences. This book argues that this crisis of imagination can be partly relieved by climate fiction, which may help us comprehend the potential impact of the crisis we are facing. Strictly assigning "climate fiction" to fictions that incorporate the climatological paradigm of anthropogenic global warming into their plots, this book sets out to salvage the term’s speculative quality. It argues that climate fiction should be regarded as no less than a vital supplement to climate science, because climate fiction makes visible and conceivable future modes of existence within worlds not only deemed likely by science, but which are scientifically anticipated. Focusing primarily on English and German language fictions, Climate Fiction and Cultural Analysis shows how Western climate fiction sketches various affective and cognitive relations to the world in its utilization of a small number of recurring imaginaries, or imagination forms. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of ecocriticism, the environmental humanities, and literary and culture studies more generally.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Expository Times

The Expository Times

Faith in the fact that spirit is truth , imagined that such a notion is a mere concert of is undoubtedly the basis of all consistent piety . the fancy . Here again , therefore , as in iii . 24 , he John assumes in this verse that we can ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: BML:37001200147895

Category:

Page:

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Women Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France

Women  Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France

What are we to make of the fact that the same year that Du Vair imagined himself as Caenis metamorphosizing into a man in La Constance et consolation, Du Laurens, in his Historia anatomica humanicorporis et singularum ejus partium ...

Author: Rebecca M. Wilkin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351871600

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 284

Grounded in medical, juridical, and philosophical texts of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century France, this innovative study tells the story of how the idea of woman contributed to the emergence of modern science. Rebecca Wilkin focuses on the contradictory representations of women from roughly the middle of the sixteenth century to the middle of the seventeenth, and depicts this period as one filled with epistemological anxiety and experimentation. She shows how skeptics, including Montaigne, Marie de Gournay, and Agrippa von Nettesheim, subverted gender hierarchies and/or blurred gender difference as a means of questioning the human capacity to find truth; while "positivists" who strove to establish new standards of truth, for example Johann Weyer, Jean Bodin, and Guillaume du Vair, excluded women from the search for truth. The book constitutes a reevaluation of the legacy of Cartesianism for women, as Wilkin argues that Descartes' opening of the search for truth "even to women" was part of his appropriation of skeptical arguments. This book challenges scholars to revise deeply held notions regarding the place of women in the early modern search for truth, their role in the development of rational thought, and the way in which intellectuals of the period dealt with the emergence of an influential female public.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Tools of Truth

Tools of Truth

TOOLS OF TRUTH Imagine a skyrocket shot into the purple night . Imagine it bursting into a tapestry of sparkling colors , lighting up the face of the beholder . Imagine the floating miracle blinking out , now here , now there , until ...

Author: Max Carl Otto

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3927891

Category: Truth

Page: 20

View: 569

Categories: Truth

Sermons Doctrinal and Practical

Sermons Doctrinal and Practical

Your correspondent seems to imagine the conclusions of my discourse to be in contrast to his own ) consolatory to ... Designed to include under a common principle two classes of facts imagined by thousands among us to be wholly ...

Author: William Archer Butler

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:AH4VRX

Category: Sermons, English

Page: 514

View: 828

Categories: Sermons, English

The Divine Truth

The Divine Truth

(4) KNOW THE TRUTH Imagine that you are driving a car and everything is moving smoothly and then suddenly after a few jerks your car stops and it starts not with your efforts and then you see that all vehicles have also stopped in the ...

Author: Son of Man

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781499008647

Category:

Page: 848

View: 448

Categories:

The Orations of Demosthenes

   The    Orations of Demosthenes

If any one upon the former occasion , in ignorance of the truth , imagined them to be harmless and inoffensive persons , I wish to read you evidence of their character , furnished by witnesses whom they have injured .

Author: Demosthenes

Publisher:

ISBN: NLI:2288416-70

Category: Speeches, addresses, etc., Greek

Page:

View: 550

Categories: Speeches, addresses, etc., Greek

The Orations of Demosthenes Against Macartaus Leochares Stephanus I Stephanus II Euergus and Mnesibulus Olympiodorus Timotheus Polycles Callippus Nicostratus Conon Callicles Dionysodorus Eubulides Theocrines Ne era and for the Naval crown The Funeral oration The Exotic oration or Panegyric upon Epicrates Exodria the Epistles

The Orations of Demosthenes  Against Macartaus  Leochares  Stephanus I  Stephanus II  Euergus and Mnesibulus  Olympiodorus  Timotheus  Polycles  Callippus  Nicostratus  Conon  Callicles  Dionysodorus  Eubulides  Theocrines  Ne  era  and for the Naval crown  The Funeral oration  The Exotic oration  or Panegyric upon Epicrates  Exodria  the Epistles

If any one upon the former occasion , in ignorance of the truth , imagined them to be harmless and inoffensive persons , I wish to read you evidence of their character , furnished by witnesses whom they have injured .

Author: Demosthenes

Publisher:

ISBN: OSU:32435056252190

Category:

Page:

View: 838

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A Dictionary of the English Language

A Dictionary of the English Language

That which assists or succors ; aid ; help ; true ; imagined ; believed . supplication to the gods , decreed by the senate when a great victory has been gained , or in assistance ; succor ; favor ; countenance . Supposed bass , ( Mus . ) ...

Author: Joseph Emerson Worcester

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951D01979612A

Category: English language

Page: 1786

View: 778

Categories: English language

The Life of Sir William Harcourt

The Life of Sir William Harcourt

I hope you will go on , and set right the facts imagined by our Ministers . They seem to me to be wanting in truth whenever they are obliged to answer on ministerial or constitutional points . It was not easy at this time to fit ...

Author: Alfred George Gardiner

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3317928

Category: Great Britain

Page: 670

View: 325

Categories: Great Britain

Contemporary Review

Contemporary Review

power of imagining or conceiving ; and secondly , that though we cannot imagine or conceive of an alteration of the qualities of space , time , or number , we can readily imagine facts which , if they existed , would prevent us from ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015021322089

Category:

Page:

View: 657

Categories:

The Contemporary Review

The Contemporary Review

power of imagining or conceiving ; and secondly , that though we cannot imagine or conceive of an alteration of the qualities of space , time , or number , we can readily imagine facts which , if they existed , would prevent us from ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B2972927

Category:

Page:

View: 622

Categories:

Descartes Meditations on First Philosophy

Descartes  Meditations on First Philosophy

Thus it cannot be true that I simply invented or imagined these properties of the triangle. ... something and not pure nothing, because it is quite clear that everything that is true is something — the truth is the same thing as being.

Author: René Descartes

Publisher: Agora Publications, Inc.

ISBN: 9781887250580

Category: Philosophy

Page: 44

View: 951

· René Descartes is often described as the first modern philosopher, but much of the content of his Meditations on First Philosophy can be found in the medieval period that had already existed for more than a thousand years. Does God exist? If so, what is his nature? Is the human soul immortal? How does it differ from the body? What role do sense experience and pure reason play in knowing? Descartes stands out from his predecessors because of the method he developed to treat these and other fundamental questions. Drawing on his study of mathematics, he searches for a way to establish absolutely certain conclusions based on indubitable premises. His importance in modern philosophy lies in the challenge he offers to every subsequent thinker in philosophy and science.
Categories: Philosophy

Old Paths

Old Paths

No doctrine can be imagined so beautifully simple as justification by faith. It is not a dark mysterious truth, intelligible to none but the great, the rich, and the learned. It places eternal life within the reach of the most unlearned ...

Author: J.C. Ryle

Publisher: Ravenio Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 536

View: 754

“If the trumpet give an uncertain sound, who shall prepare himself to the battle?”—1 Corinthians 14:8 THE volume now in the reader’s hands consists of a series of papers, systematically arranged, on the leading truths of Christianity which are “necessary to salvation.” Few, probably, will deny that there are some things in religion about which we may think other people hold very erroneous views, and are, notwithstanding, in no danger of being finally lost. About baptism and the Lord’s Supper,—about the Christian ministry,—about forms of prayer and modes of worship,—about the union of Church and State,—about all these things it is commonly admitted that people may differ widely, and yet be finally saved. No doubt there are always bigots and extreme partisans, who are ready to excommunicate every one who cannot pronounce their Shibboleth on the above-named points. But, speaking generally, to shut out of heaven all who disagree with us about these things, is to take up a position which most thoughtful Christians condemn as unscriptural, narrow; and uncharitable. On the ether hand, there are certain great truths of which some knowledge, by common consent, appears essential to salvation. Such truths are the immortality of the soul,—the sinfulness of human nature, the work of Christ for us as our Redeemer, the work of the Holy Ghost in us,—forgiveness, justification,—conversion,—faith,—repentance,—the marks of a right heart,—Christ’s invitations,—Christ’s intercession, and the like. If truths like these are not absolutely necessary to salvation, it is difficult to understand how any truths whatever can be called necessary. If people may be saved without knowing anything about these truths, it appears to me that we may throw away our Bibles altogether, and proclaim that the Christian religion is of no use. From such a miserable conclusion I hope most people will shrink back with horror. To open out and explain these great necessary truths,—to confirm them by Scripture,—to enforce them by some appeals to the conscience of all who read this volume,—this is the simple object of the series of papers which is now offered to the public. The name which I have selected will prepare the reader to expect no new doctrines in this volume. It is simple, unadulterated, old-fashioned Evangelical theology. It contains nothing but the “Old Paths” in which the Apostolic Christians, the Reformers, the best English Churchmen for the last three hundred years, and the best Evangelical Christians of the present day, have persistently walked. From these “paths.” I see no reason to depart. They are often sneered at and ridiculed, as old-fashioned, effete, worn out, and powerless in the Nineteenth Century. Be it so. “None of these things move me.” I have yet to learn that there is any system of religious teaching, by whatever name it may be called, High, or Broad, or Romish, or Neologian, which produces one quarter of the effect on human nature that is produced by the old, despised system of doctrine which is commonly called Evangelical. I willingly admit the zeal, earnestness, and devotedness of many religious teachers who are not Evangelical. But I firmly maintain that the way of the school to which I belong is the “more excellent way.” The longer I live the more I am convinced that the world needs no new Gospel, as some profess to think. I am thoroughly persuaded that the world needs nothing but a bold, full, unflinching teaching of the “old paths.” The heart of man is the same in every age. The spiritual medicine which it requires is always the same. The same Gospel which was preached by Latimer, and Hooper, and Bradford, ruby Hall, Deviant, Usher, Reynolds, and Hopkins,—by Manton, Brooks, Watson, Charnock, Owen, and Gurnall,—by Romaine, Venn, Grimshaw, Hervey, and Cecil,—this is the gospel which alone will do real good in the present day. The leading doctrines of that gospel are the substance of the papers which compose this volume. They are the doctrines, I firmly believe, of the Bible and the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England. They are doctrines which, I find, wear well, and in the faith of them I hope to live and die. I repeat most emphatically that I am not ashamed of what are commonly called “Evangelical principles.” Fiercely and bitterly as those principles are assailed on all sides,—loudly and scornfully as some proclaim that they have done their work and are useless in this day, I see no evidence whatever that they are defective or decayed, and I see no reason for giving them up. No doubt other schools of thought produce great outward effects on mankind, gather large congregations, attain great popularity, and by means of music, ornaments, gestures, postures, and a generally histrionic ceremonial, make a great show of religion. I see it all, and I am not surprised. It is exactly what a study of human nature by the light of the Bible would lead me to expect. But for real inward effects on hearts, and outward effects on lives, I see no teaching so powerful as thorough, genuine Evangelical teaching. Just in proportion as the preachers of other schools borrow Evangelical weapons and Evangelical phraseology I see them obtaining influence. No doubt the good that is done in the world is little, and evil abounds. But I am certain that the teaching which does most good is that of the despised Evangelical school. It is not merely true and good up to a certain point, and then defective and needing additions, as some tell us; it is true and good all round, and needs no addition at all. If those who hold Evangelical views were only more faithful to their own principles, and more bold, and uncompromising, and decided, both in their preaching and their lives, they would soon find, whatever infidels and Romanists may please to say, that they hold the only lever which can shake the world. The readers of the many tracts which God has allowed me to send forth for thirty years, must not expect much that they have not seen before, in “Old Paths.” Experience has taught me, at last, that the peculiar tastes of all classes of society must be consulted, if good is to be done by the press. I am convinced that there are thousands of people in England who are willing to read a volume, but will never look at anything in the form of a tract. It is for them that I now send forth “Old Paths.” Those who read through this book continuously, and without a pause, will, doubtless, observe a certain degree of sameness and similarity in some of the papers. The same thoughts are occasionally repeated, though in a different dress. To account for this, I will ask them to remember that most of the papers were originally written separately, and at long intervals of time, in some cases of as much as twenty years. On calm reflection, I have thought it better to republish them, pretty much as they originally appeared. Few readers of a religious book like this read it all through at once; and the great majority, I suspect, find it enough to read quietly only one or two chapters at a time. I now send forth the volume with a deep sense of its many defects; but with an earnest prayer that it may do some good. J. C. LIVERPOOL. This classic includes the following chapters: Chapter 1. Inspiration Chapter 2. Our Souls! Chapter 3. Few Saved! Chapter 4. Our Hope! Chapter 5. “Alive or Dead?” Chapter 6. Our Sins! Chapter 7. Forgiveness Chapter 8. Justification Chapter 9. The Cross of Christ Chapter 10. The Holy Ghost Chapter 11. Having the Spirit Chapter 12. Conversion Chapter 13. The Heart Chapter 14. Christ’s Invitation Chapter 15. Faith Chapter 16. Repentance Chapter 17. Christ’s Power to Save Chapter 18. Election Chapter 19. Perseverance
Categories: Religion

Philip Roth and the American Liberal Tradition

Philip Roth and the American Liberal Tradition

While, in fact, I was thinking in much the same vein: I'll make this reality mine. ... people such as Amy, Lonoff, and Hawthorne are only ever known to him as imagined literary subjects rather than in terms of sworn biographical “facts.

Author: Andy Connolly

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498511810

Category: Political Science

Page: 292

View: 980

Philip Roth and the American Liberal Tradition offers a fresh reading of the later career development of one of America’s most celebrated authors. Through a contextual analysis of a select number of texts, this innovative study discusses how famed novels such as American Pastoral and The Plot against America demonstrate Philip Roth’s considerable interest in mapping, by means of his unique literary talent, the changing shape and fortunes of American liberalism since the 1930s. By viewing these novels and other seminal works of his later period through a wider historical lens, this book informs readers of the myriad ways in which Roth’s major phase of writing since the mid-1990s has shown considerable concern with questions of class, ethnicity, race, gender, and literary culture, all of which have been key components in the shifting intellectual and political makeup of American liberal ideology from the New Deal to our present time. This book goes beyond a mere historical analysis by taking a new look at how Roth’s experimentations in narrative style and his appeal to ahistorical notions of literary tradition rest in complex alignment with his fictional treatment of aspects of American history. This novel work of criticism demonstrates a heightened awareness of Roth’s career-length fascination with the formal characteristics of fiction, making clear to its audience that any reductively linear reading of Roth as a political novelist should be avoided at all costs. Ultimately, Philip Roth and the American Liberal Tradition offers a stimulatingly intelligent approach to the art of one of America’s true literary titans, providing the focused reader with a nuanced understanding of how Roth’s fiction has been shaped by the various competing strains in his dual roles as a disinterested formalist aesthete, on the one hand, and as a politically engaged author on the other.
Categories: Political Science