Citizenship and Belonging in France and North America

Citizenship and Belonging in France and North America

... Multicultural Snake Oil: A Newcomer's Introduction to Black Canada,” Unsettling the Great White North: African Canadian History, eds. M. Johnson and F. Aladejebi (Toronto: University of Toronto Press). Forthcoming.

Author: Ramona Mielusel

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030301583

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 797

The first decades of the new millennium have been marked by major political changes. Although The West has wished to revisit internal and international politics concerning migration policies, refugee status, integration, secularism, and the dismantling of communitarianism, events like the Syrian refugee crisis, the terrorist attacks in France in 2015-2016, and the economic crisis of 2008 have resurrected concepts such as national identity, integration, citizenship and re-shaping state policies in many developed countries. In France and Canada, more recent public elections have brought complex democratic political figures like Emmanuel Macron and Justin Trudeau to the public eye. Both leaders were elected based on their promising political agendas that aimed at bringing their countries into the new millennium; Trudeau promotes multiculturalism, while Macron touts the diverse nation and the inclusion of diverse ethnic communities to the national model. This edited collection aims to establish a dialogue between these two countries and across disciplines in search of such discursive illustrations and opposing discourses. Analyzing the cultural and political tensions between minority groups and the state in light of political events that question ideas of citizenship and belonging to a multicultural nation, the chapters in this volume serve as a testimonial to the multiple views on the political and public perception of multicultural practices and their national and international applicability to our current geopolitical context.
Categories: Political Science

Facilitating Community Research for Social Change

Facilitating Community Research for Social Change

International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 18, 1609406918821574. Johnson, M., & Aladejebi, F. (Eds.). (2022). Unsettling the great white north: Black Canadian history. University of Toronto Press. 9781487529178.

Author: Casey Burkholder

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000568523

Category: Psychology

Page: 314

View: 649

Facilitating Community Research for Social Change asks: what does ethical research facilitation look like in projects that seek to move toward social change? How can scholars weave political and social justice through multiple levels of the research process? This edited collection presents chapters that investigate research facilitation in ways that specifically attempt to disrupt and challenge anti-Indigenous and anti-Black racism, ableism, homophobia, transphobia, patriarchy, and sexism to work toward social change. It also explores what it means to develop facilitation practices across multiple contexts and research settings, including specific facilitation methods considered by researchers working with visual and community-based methods with Black, Indigenous, and racialized communities. The complexities of how scholars negotiate decisions within their research with people and communities have an effect not only on how researchers construct their participants and communities, but also on the overall purpose of projects, the ways their projects are shared and disseminated, and what is learned in the doing of facilitation. This book will be of great interest to both emerging and established researchers working within the social sciences. It specifically attends to diverse fields within the social sciences that include health, media studies, environmental studies, social work, sociology, education, participatory visual research methodologies, as well as the evolving field of digital humanities.
Categories: Psychology

Biographical Dictionary of Enslaved Black People in the Maritimes

Biographical Dictionary of Enslaved Black People in the Maritimes

Source: Karolyn Smardz Frost, “Planting Slavery in Nova Scotia's Promised Land, 1759– 1775,” in Unsettling the Great White North: African Canadian History, eds. Michele A. Johnson and Funké Aladejebi (Toronto: University of Toronto ...

Author: Harvey Amani Whitfield

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781487543839

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 351

This important book sheds light on more than 1,400 brief life histories of mostly enslaved Black people, with the goal of recovering their individual lives. Harvey Amani Whitfield unearths the stories of men, women, and children who would not otherwise have found their way into written history. The individuals mentioned come from various points of origin, including Africa, the West Indies, the Carolinas, the Chesapeake, and the northern states, showcasing the remarkable range of the Black experience in the Atlantic world. Whitfield makes it clear that these enslaved Black people had likes, dislikes, distinct personality traits, and different levels of physical, spiritual, and intellectual talent. Biographical Dictionary of Enslaved Black People in the Maritimes affirms the notion that they were all unique individuals, despite the efforts of their owners and the wider Atlantic world to dehumanize and erase them.
Categories: History

Who Pays for Canada

Who Pays for Canada

Richard Almonte (Toronto: The Mercury Press, 1998), 74 26 See Barrington Walker, “Critical Histories of Blackness,” in Unsettling the Great White North: African Canadian History, ed. M. Johnston and F. Aladejebi (forthcoming, ...

Author: E.A. Heaman

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780228002598

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 523

Canadians can never not argue about taxes. From the Chinese head tax to the Panama Papers, from the National Policy to the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement, tax grievances always inspire private resentments and public debates. But if resentment and debate persist, the terms of the debate have continually altered and adapted to reflect changing social, economic, and political conditions in Canada and the wider world. The centenary of income tax is the occasion for Canadian scholars to wrestle with past and present debates about tax equity, efficiency, and justice. Who Pays for Canada? explores the different ways governments can and should tax their peoples and evaluates how well Canada has done so. It brings together a diverse group of perspectives from academia - law, economics, political science, history, geography, philosophy, and accountancy - and from the wider world of activists and public servants. It asks how Canada compares to other countries and how other countries - especially the United States - influence Canadian tax policies. It also surveys internal tax tensions and politics, through the lenses of region and jurisdiction, as well as race, class, and gender. Reasoning from tax perplexities and reforms in the past and the present, it argues that fair taxation requires an informed populace and a democratically inclined public will. Above all, this book serves as a reminder that it is not only what counts as fair that is important, but how fairness is evaluated. Revealing how closely tax policy is tied to mainstream politics, human rights, and morality, Who Pays for Canada? represents new perspectives on a matter of tremendous national urgency.
Categories: Political Science

Unsettling Mobility

Unsettling Mobility

... from their Cree community of Whamagoostui in northern Québec to walk sixteen hundred kilometers to the Canadian capital of Ottawa.1 Members of Cree and other Algonquian ... with the stereotypical image of Canada's Great White North.

Author: Michelle Lelièvre

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816534852

Category: Social Science

Page: 257

View: 889

"The book looks at how the continued mobility of the indigenous Mi'kmaw people has served as a demonstration of sovereignty over their ancestral lands and water despite the encroachment of European settlers"--Provided by publisher.
Categories: Social Science

Unsettling Colonial Modernity in Islamicate Contexts

Unsettling Colonial Modernity in Islamicate Contexts

Exploring Differences in Canadian Local Press Coverage of Missing/Murdered Aboriginal and White Women.” Feminist Media Studies 10, no. ... “The Great White North Encounters September 11: Race, Of Terrorism and Barbarism 253.

Author: Kara Adbolmaleki

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443893749

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 964

By focusing on colonial histories and legacies, this edited volume breaks new ground in studying modernity in Islamicate contexts. From a range of disciplinary perspectives, the authors probe ‘colonial modernity’ as a condition whose introduction into Islamicate contexts was facilitated historically by European encroachment into South Asia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa. They also analyze the various modes through which, in Europe itself, and in North America by extension, people from Islamicate contexts have been, and continue to be, otherized in the constitution and advancement of the project of modernity. The book further brings to light a multiplicity of social, political, cultural, and aesthetic modes of resistance aimed at subverting and unsettling colonial modernity in both Muslim-majority and diasporic contexts.
Categories: History

Unsettling the Colonial Places and Spaces of Early Childhood Education

Unsettling the Colonial Places and Spaces of Early Childhood Education

In A. Baldwin, L. Cameron, and A. Kobayashi (Eds.) Rethinking the great white North: Race, nature and the historical geographies of whiteness in Canada. Vancouver: UBC Press, pp. 169–90. Cameron, E. (2012). New geographies of story and ...

Author: Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317675112

Category: Education

Page: 242

View: 990

Unsettling the Colonial Places and Spaces of Early Childhood Education uncovers and interrogates some of the inherent colonialist tensions that are rarely acknowledged and often unwittingly rehearsed within contemporary early childhood education. Through building upon the prior postcolonial interventions of prominent early childhood scholars, Unsettling the Colonial Places and Spaces of Early Childhood Education reveals how early childhood education is implicated in the colonialist project of predominantly immigrant (post)colonial settler societies. By politicizing the silences around these specifically settler colonialist tensions, it seeks to further unsettle the innocence presumptions of early childhood education and to offer some decolonizing strategies for early childhood practitioners and scholars. Grounding their inquiries in early childhood education, the authors variously engage with postcolonial theory, place theory, feminist philosophy, the ecological humanities and indigenous onto-epistemologies.
Categories: Education

Rethinking the Great White North

Rethinking the Great White North

Anxious reconciliation(s): Unsettling foundations and spatializing history. Society and Space 22: 831-45. Binswanger, H., K. Deininger, and G. Feder. 1995. Power, distortions, revolt and reform in agricultural land relations.

Author: Andrew Baldwin

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774820165

Category: Social Science

Page: 356

View: 852

Canadian national identity is bound to the idea of a Great White North. Images of snow, wilderness, and emptiness seem innocent, yet this path-breaking book reveals they contain the seeds of racism. Informed by the insight that racism is geographical as well as historical and cultural, the contributors trace how notions of race, whiteness, and nature helped construct a white country in travel writing and treaty making; in scientific research and park planning; and in towns, cities, and tourist centres. Rethinking the Great White North offers a new vocabulary for contemporary debates on Canada's role in the North and the meaning of the nation.
Categories: Social Science

Revisiting The Great White North

Revisiting The Great White North

The result is an interesting, invigorating, and unsettling group of chapters that challenge readers to also revisit and rethink their own ideas about Whiteness, privilege, and power. Situated in the Canadian context, ...

Author: Darren E. Lund

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789462098695

Category: Education

Page: 306

View: 350

Returning seven years later to their original pieces from this landmark book, over 20 leading scholars and activists revisit and reframe their rich contributions to a burgeoning scholarship on Whiteness. With new reflective writings for each chapter, and valuable sections on relevant readings and resources, this volume refreshes and enhances the first text to pay critical and sustained attention to Whiteness in education, with implications far beyond national borders. Contributors include George Sefa Dei, Tracey Lindberg, Carl James, Cynthia Levine-Rasky, and the late Patrick Solomon. Courageously examining diverse perspectives, contexts, and institutional practices, contributors to this volume dismantle the underpinnings of inequitable power relations, privilege, and marginalization. The book’s relevance extends to those in a range of settings, with abundant and poignant lessons for enhancing and understanding transformative social justice work in education. Revisiting The Great White North? offers terrific grist for examining the persistence of Whiteness even as it shape-shifts. Chapters are comprehensive, theoretically rich, and anchored in personal experience. Authors’ reflections on the seven years since publication of the first edition of this book complexify how we understand Whiteness, while simultaneously driving home the need not only to grapple with it, but to work against it. Christine Sleeter, Professor Emerita, California State University Monterey Bay Our understanding of racial inequities in education will be impoverished unless we look deeply at White privilege, its variation in different contexts, and resistances to change. Such is the call in this important book by Lund, Carr, and colleagues, whose analyses within Canadian contexts, framed and re-framed for this captivating revised edition, will be useful to educators and scholars around the world. Read this book today. Kevin Kumashiro, Dean, School of Education, University of San Francisco; President, National Association for Multicultural Education Darren Lund and Paul Carr have given the contributors to their original 2007 text the opportunity to revisit, rethink, reconceptualize, and reframe their earlier work. The result is an interesting, invigorating, and unsettling group of chapters that challenge readers to also revisit and rethink their own ideas about Whiteness, privilege, and power .... Teachers, administrators, policymakers, and researchers will all benefit from this critical work. Sonia Nieto, Professor Emerita, Language, Literacy, and Culture College of Education, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Lund and Carr bring together a superb collection of authors who collectively challenge readers to go beyond liberal platitudes about race ... until educators confront the political, social and economic consequences of inequitably distributed privilege, the path towards equality and freedom will remain elusive. By immersing us in the discourse of Whiteness, the essays in this book illuminate that very path. Joel Westheimer, University Research Chair & Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa
Categories: Education

The Great White North

The Great White North

They also failed to link past historical injustices to how the realities at our school, in our communities and across the globe were structured, in great part, by the dominant society engaging in the “Othering” of minoritized peoples ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789087901448

Category: Education

Page: 265

View: 344

This landmark book represents the first text to pay critical and sustained attention to Whiteness in Canada from an impressive line-up of leading scholars and activists. The burgeoning scholarship on Whiteness will benefit richly from this book’s timely inclusion of the insights of Canadian scholars, educators, activists and others working for social justice within and through the educational system, with implications far beyond national borders.
Categories: Education