West of Eden

West of Eden

Title: West of Eden: an American place (Jean Stein. Description: New York: Random House, 2016. Identifiers: LCCN 201502.24m | ISBN 97808.2998.465 (hardback) ISBN 97808299842 (ebook) Subjects: LCSH: Los Angeles (Calif.)—Biography.

Author: Jean Stein

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780812998412

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 200

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An epic, mesmerizing oral history of Hollywood and Los Angeles from the author of the contemporary classic Edie Jean Stein transformed the art of oral history in her groundbreaking book Edie: American Girl, an indelible portrait of Andy Warhol “superstar” Edie Sedgwick, which was edited with George Plimpton. Now, in West of Eden, she turns to Los Angeles, the city of her childhood. Stein vividly captures a mythic cast of characters: their ambitions and triumphs as well as their desolation and grief. These stories illuminate the bold aspirations of five larger-than-life individuals and their families. West of Eden is a work of history both grand in scale and intimate in detail. At the center of each family is a dreamer who finds fortune and strife in Southern California: Edward Doheny, the Wisconsin-born oil tycoon whose corruption destroyed the reputation of a U.S. president and led to his own son’s violent death; Jack Warner, the son of Polish-Jewish immigrants, who together with his brothers founded one of the world’s most iconic film studios; Jane Garland, the troubled daughter of an aspiring actress who could never escape her mother’s schemes; Jennifer Jones, an actress from Oklahoma who won the Academy Award at twenty-five but struggled with despair amid her fame and glamour. Finally, Stein chronicles the ascent of her own father, Jules Stein, an eye doctor born in Indiana who transformed Hollywood with the creation of an unrivaled agency and studio. In each chapter, Stein paints a portrait of an outsider who pins his or her hopes on the nascent power and promise of Los Angeles. Each individual’s unyielding intensity pushes loved ones, especially children, toward a perilous threshold. West of Eden depicts the city that has projected its own image of America onto the world, in all its idealism and paradox. As she did in Edie, Jean Stein weaves together the personal recollections of an array of individuals to create an astonishing tapestry of a place like no other. Praise for West of Eden “Compulsively readable, capturing not just a vibrant part of the history of Los Angeles—that uniquely ‘American Place’ Stein refers to in her subtitle—but also the real drama of this town . . . It’s like being at an insider’s cocktail party where the most delicious gossip about the rich and powerful is being dished by smart people, such as Gore Vidal, Joan Didion, Arthur Miller and Dennis Hopper. . . . Mesmerizing.”—Los Angeles Times “Perhaps the most surprising thing that emerges from this riveting book is a glimpse of what seems like deep truth. It’s possible that oral history as Stein practices it . . . is as close as we’re going to come to the real story of anything.”—The New York Times Book Review “Enthralling . . . brings some of [L.A.’s] biggest personalities to life . . . As she did for Edie Sedgwick in Edie: American Girl, [Stein] harnesses a gossipy chorus of voices.”—Vogue “Even if you’re a connoisseur of Hollywood tales, you’ve probably never heard these. . . . As ever, gaudy, debauched, merciless Hollywood has the power to enthrall its audience.”—The Wall Street Journal “The tales of jaw-dropping excess, cruelty, and betrayal are the stuff of movies, and the pleasures are immense.”—Vanity Fair “This riveting oral history chronicles the development of Los Angeles, from oil boomtown to Tinseltown.”—Entertainment Weekly (“Must List”)
Categories: History

High Noon

High Noon

The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic Glenn Frankel. Janis, Maria Cooper. ... Tex Ritter: America's Most Beloved Cowboy. Austin: Eakin Press, 1998. ... West of Eden: An American Place. New York: Random House, ...

Author: Glenn Frankel

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781620409503

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 562

From the New York Times-bestselling author of The Searchers, the revelatory story behind the classic movie High Noon and the toxic political climate in which it was created. It's one of the most revered movies of Hollywood's golden era. Starring screen legend Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in her first significant film role, High Noon was shot on a lean budget over just thirty-two days but achieved instant box-office and critical success. It won four Academy Awards in 1953, including a best actor win for Cooper. And it became a cultural touchstone, often cited by politicians as a favorite film, celebrating moral fortitude. Yet what has been often overlooked is that High Noon was made during the height of the Hollywood blacklist, a time of political inquisition and personal betrayal. In the middle of the film shoot, screenwriter Carl Foreman was forced to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his former membership in the Communist Party. Refusing to name names, he was eventually blacklisted and fled the United States. (His co-authored screenplay for another classic, The Bridge on the River Kwai, went uncredited in 1957.) Examined in light of Foreman's testimony, High Noon's emphasis on courage and loyalty takes on deeper meaning and importance. In this book, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel tells the story of the making of a great American Western, exploring how Carl Foreman's concept of High Noon evolved from idea to first draft to final script, taking on allegorical weight. Both the classic film and its turbulent political times emerge newly illuminated.
Categories: History

The People s Team

The People s Team

Ives, Gail, in association with On Broadway, Inc. Green Bay's West Side: The Fort Howard Neighborhood. Charleston, SC: Arcadia ... West: A Rivalry 100 Years in the Making. Green Bay: Green Bay East ... West of Eden: An American Place.

Author: Mark Beech

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

ISBN: 9781328460134

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 597

The definitive, lavishly illustrated history of the Green Bay Packers, commemorating the team's 100-year anniversary Not only are the Packers the only fan-owned team in any of North America's major pro sports leagues, but Green Bay -- population 104,057 -- is also the smallest city with a big-time franchise. The Packers are, in other words, unlikely candidates to be pro football's preeminent team. And yet nobody in the NFL has won more championships. The story of Titletown, USA, is the greatest story in sports. Through extensive archival research and unmatched insider access to players and team officials, past and present, Mark Beech tells the first complete rags-to-riches history of the Green Bay Packers, a full chronicle of the most illustrious team in NFL history. The People's Team paints compelling pictures of a franchise, a town, and a fan base. No other team in pro sports is so bound to the place that gave birth to it. Here is the story of the Packers and of Green Bay -- from the days of the French fur traders who settled on the shores of La Baie in the seventeenth century, to the team's pursuit of its fourteenth NFL championship. Featuring essays by Peter King, Chuck Mercein, Austin Murphy, and David S. Neft, The People's Team is a must-have for fans, old and new, and the definitive illustrated history of the most important team in the NFL.
Categories: History

Edie

Edie

Norman Mailer hen Edie: American Girl was first published, it quickly became an international bestseller and then ... The Times of Robert Kennedy and West of Eden: An American Place. cover image tromth-to-clao-Mamouttan -copyright 1972.

Author: Jean Stein

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 9780802190635

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 564

View: 529

When Edie was first published, it quickly became an international bestseller and then took its place among the classic books about the 1960s. Edie Sedgwick exploded into the public eye like a comet. She seemed to have it all: she was aristocratic and glamorous, vivacious and young, Andy Warhol’s superstar. But within a few years she flared out as quickly as she had appeared, and before she turned twenty-nine she was dead from a drug overdose. In a dazzling tapestry of voices—family, friends, lovers, rivals—the entire meteoric trajectory of Edie Sedgwick’s life is brilliantly captured. And so is the Pop Art world of the ‘60s: the sex, drugs, fashion, music—the mad rush for pleasure and fame. All glitter and flash on the outside, it was hollow and desperate within—like Edie herself, and like her mentor, Andy Warhol. Alternately mesmerizing, tragic, and horrifying, this book shattered many myths about the ‘60s experience in America.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Hank and Jim

Hank and Jim

Smith, Starr. Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilot. St. Paul: Zenith Press, 2005. Spoto, Donald. A Girl's Got to Breathe: The Life of Teresa Wright. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2016. Stein, Jean. West of Eden: An American Place.

Author: Scott Eyman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781501102196

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 366

“[A] remarkably absorbing, supremely entertaining joint biography” (The New York Times) from bestselling author Scott Eyman about the remarkable friendship of Henry Fonda and James Stewart, two Hollywood legends who maintained a close relationship that endured all of life’s twists and turns. Henry Fonda and James Stewart were two of the biggest stars in Hollywood for forty years, but they became friends when they were unknown. They roomed together as stage actors in New York, and when they began making films in Hollywood, they were roommates again. Between them they made such classic films as The Grapes of Wrath, Mister Roberts, Twelve Angry Men, and On Golden Pond; and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, The Philadelphia Story, It’s a Wonderful Life, Vertigo, and Rear Window. They got along famously, with a shared interest in elaborate practical jokes and model airplanes, among other things. But their friendship also endured despite their differences: Fonda was a liberal Democrat, Stewart a conservative Republican. Fonda was a ladies’ man who was married five times; Stewart remained married to the same woman for forty-five years. Both men volunteered during World War II and were decorated for their service. When Stewart returned home, still unmarried, he once again moved in with Fonda, his wife, and his two children, Jane and Peter, who knew him as Uncle Jimmy. For his “breezy, entertaining” (Publishers Weekly) Hank and Jim, biographer and film historian Scott Eyman spoke with Fonda’s widow and children as well as three of Stewart’s children, plus actors and directors who had worked with the men—in addition to doing extensive archival research to get the full details of their time together. This is not just another Hollywood story, but “a fascinating…richly documented biography” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) of an extraordinary friendship that lasted through war, marriages, children, careers, and everything else.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Twelve Lives of Alfred Hitchcock An Anatomy of the Master of Suspense

The Twelve Lives of Alfred Hitchcock  An Anatomy of the Master of Suspense

The Silent Feminists: America's First Women Directors. Lanham, MD, and London: Scarecrow ... Fat History: Bodies and Beauty in the Modern West. New York: New York University Press, 1997. Stein, Jean. West of Eden: An American Place.

Author: Edward White

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9781324002406

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 832

A fresh, innovative biography of the twentieth century’s most iconic filmmaker. In The Twelve Lives of Alfred Hitchcock, Edward White explores the Hitchcock phenomenon—what defines it, how it was invented, what it reveals about the man at its core, and how its legacy continues to shape our cultural world. The book’s twelve chapters illuminate different aspects of Hitchcock’s life and work: “The Boy Who Couldn’t Grow Up”; “The Murderer”; “The Auteur”; “The Womanizer”; “The Fat Man”; “The Dandy”; “The Family Man”; “The Voyeur”; “The Entertainer”; “The Pioneer”; “The Londoner”; “The Man of God.” Each of these angles reveals something fundamental about the man he was and the mythological creature he has become, presenting not just the life Hitchcock lived but also the various versions of himself that he projected, and those projected on his behalf. From Hitchcock’s early work in England to his most celebrated films, White astutely analyzes Hitchcock’s oeuvre and provides new interpretations. He also delves into Hitchcock’s ideas about gender; his complicated relationships with “his women”—not only Grace Kelly and Tippi Hedren but also his female audiences—as well as leading men such as Cary Grant, and writes movingly of Hitchcock’s devotion to his wife and lifelong companion, Alma, who made vital contributions to numerous classic Hitchcock films, and burnished his mythology. And White is trenchant in his assessment of the Hitchcock persona, so carefully created that Hitchcock became not only a figurehead for his own industry but nothing less than a cultural icon. Ultimately, White’s portrayal illuminates a vital truth: Hitchcock was more than a Hollywood titan; he was the definitive modern artist, and his significance reaches far beyond the confines of cinema.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Broadcast 41

The Broadcast 41

Kenneth O'Reilly, Hoover and the Un-Americans (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1983); Athan G. Theoharis, Spying on Americans: Political ... Jean Stein, West of Eden: An American Place, New York, NY: Random House, 2017,85.

Author: Carol A Stabile

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9781906897895

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 269

How forty-one women—including Dorothy Parker, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Lena Horne—were forced out of American television and radio in the 1950s “Red Scare.” At the dawn of the Cold War era, forty-one women working in American radio and television were placed on a media blacklist and forced from their industry. The ostensible reason: so-called Communist influence. But in truth these women—among them Dorothy Parker, Lena Horne, and Gypsy Rose Lee—were, by nature of their diversity and ambition, a threat to the traditional portrayal of the American family on the airwaves. This book from Goldsmiths Press describes what American radio and television lost when these women were blacklisted, documenting their aspirations and achievements. Through original archival research and access to FBI blacklist documents, The Broadcast 41 details the blacklisted women's attempts in the 1930s and 1940s to depict America as diverse, complicated, and inclusive. The book tells a story about what happens when non-male, non-white perspectives are excluded from media industries, and it imagines what the new medium of television might have looked like had dissenting viewpoints not been eliminated at such a formative moment. The all-white, male-dominated Leave it to Beaver America about which conservative politicians wax nostalgic existed largely because of the forcible silencing of these forty-one women and others like them. For anyone concerned with the ways in which our cultural narrative is constructed, this book offers an urgent reminder of the myths we perpetuate when a select few dominate the airwaves.
Categories: History

Making Music in Selznick s Hollywood

Making Music in Selznick s Hollywood

... said that every relationship my father had was a Pygmalion relationship. It was that way with Ingrid Bergman and Joan Fontaine and Rhonda Fleming and all the others.” Quoted in Jean Stein, West of Eden: An American Place (New York, ...

Author: Nathan Platte

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199371129

Category: Music

Page: 504

View: 726

Through the rise and fall of the Hollywood studio system, David O. Selznick reigned as Hollywood's preeminent producer. His reputation depended in large part on music. The orchestral cacophony of King Kong, the pulsing electronic sonorities of Spellbound, and the Tara theme from Gone with the Wind made music a distinguishing feature of the Selznick experience. By flaunting music's role in film and overseeing its distribution through sheet music, concerts, radio broadcasts, and soundtrack albums, Selznick cultivated a fascination with film scores. But he did not do it alone. In Making Music in Selznick's Hollywood, Nathan Platte brings to light the men and women whose work sounds throughout Selznick's many films. The cast includes familiar composers like Max Steiner, Franz Waxman, and Dimitri Tiomkin, but extends to overlooked contributors, including music editor Audray Granville, orchestrator Hugo Friedhofer, harpist Louise Klos, choral director Jester Hairston, publicist Ted Wick, and many others. Novelists, studio writers, and directors like Alfred Hitchcock also influenced the soundscapes of Selznick's films. Whether working with the producer directly or managing his presence from a distance, all had to reckon with Selznick's musical preoccupations. Rarely was it easy. Rewritten scores, fired personnel, and other skirmishes reflect the troubles-and uneven compromises-that shaped music for films like Gone with the Wind, Duel in the Sun, and Rebecca. Even Selznick anticipated that such problems would "go down in the history of Hollywood as the last wild fling of people who really fiddled-and how!-while Hollywood burned." Drawing on extensive archival research, Platte recounts those stories here, tracing Selznick's musical labors during the silent era through his work at the major studios and his culminating efforts at Selznick International Pictures. Taken together, Selznick's films provide a sweeping vista of the relationships among musicians and filmmakers that defined the Hollywood sound.
Categories: Music

Music Business Handbook and Career Guide

Music Business Handbook and Career Guide

West of Eden: An American Place. New York: Random House, 2016. Steinberg, Irwin, and Greenblatt, Harmon. Understanding the Music Business: A Comprehensive View, 5th ed. Needham Heights, MA: National Book Network, 2009. Stim, Richard.

Author: David Baskerville

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781544341194

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 632

View: 982

The Twelfth Edition of this powerhouse best-selling text maintains its tradition as the most comprehensive, up-to-date guide to the music industry in all of its diversity. Readers new to the music business and seasoned professionals alike will find David and Tim Baskerville’s handbook the go-to source, regardless of their specialty within the music field. Music Business Handbook and Career Guide is ideal for introductory courses such as Introduction to the Music Business, Music and Media, and other survey courses as well as more specialized courses such as the record industry, music careers, artist management, and more. The fully updated Twelfth Edition includes a comprehensive discussion of the streaming revolution and its impact on all parts of the value chain, including composers, performing artists, publishers, and labels. The book also analyzes shifts in the competing platforms of consumption ranging from fast-shrinking physical formats and broadcasting to downloads and subscription services. This edition offers more vignettes than ever, illustrating how individuals in different industry roles advanced their careers, as well as how they’ve adjusted to the intertwining influences of technology, law, and culture.
Categories: Business & Economics

Brando s Bride

Brando s Bride

Jean (2016) West Of Eden: An American Place, London, Jonathan Cape. Sweet, Matthew (2005) Shepperton Babylon: The Lost Worlds of British Cinema, London, Faber and Faber. Tanitch, Robert (2004) Brando, London, Cassell Illustrated.

Author: Sarah Broughton

Publisher: Parthian Books

ISBN: 9781912681594

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 180

View: 461

The incredibly true story of Anna Kashfi and her marriage to Hollywood’s greatest star, written by film and television producer Sarah Broughton. In October 1957 Marlon Brando married a young studio actress called Anna Kashfi. He was thirty-three and at the pinnacle of his beautiful fame having recently won an Oscar for On the Waterfront. The wedding was front-page news around the world. His new bride was twenty-three, claimed to be an Indian princess and was pregnant. The day after the wedding a factory worker living in Wales, William O'Callaghan, revealed that Brando's bride was in fact his daughter, Joan O'Callaghan and had been a butcher's assistant from Cardiff. This book sets out to discover who was telling the truth and who was lying – and, perhaps more importantly, why?
Categories: Biography & Autobiography