When Machines Play Chopin

When Machines Play Chopin

In Lutezia, Heine describes Paganini as a true artist in a more direct manner than he does in “Florentine Nights”: Even the greatest masters' playing did not seldom depend on outer and inner influences. I have never heard anyone play ...

Author: Katherine Maree Hirt

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110232394

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 179

View: 881

When Machines Play Chopin brings together music aesthetics, performance practices, and the history of automated musical instruments in nineteenth-century German literature. Philosophers defined music as a direct expression of human emotion while soloists competed with one another to display machine-like technical perfection at their instruments. When Machines Play Chopin looks at this paradox between thinking about and practicing music to show what three literary works say about automation and the sublime in art.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Player Piano and the Edwardian Novel

The Player Piano and the Edwardian Novel

Yet the apparent ease with which he plays needs to be considered in further detail. ... When Machines Play Chopin: Musical Spirit and Automation in Nineteenth-Century Literature (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2010), 123.

Author: Cecilia Björkén-Nyberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317021223

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 676

In her study of music-making in the Edwardian novel, Cecilia Björkén-Nyberg argues that the invention and development of the player piano had a significant effect on the perception, performance and appreciation of music during the period. In contrast to existing devices for producing music mechanically such as the phonograph and gramophone, the player piano granted its operator freedom of individual expression by permitting the performer to modify the tempo. Because the traditional piano was the undisputed altar of domestic and highly gendered music-making, Björkén-Nyberg suggests, the potential for intervention by the mechanical piano's operator had a subversive effect on traditional notions about the status of the musical work itself and about the people who were variously defined by their relationship to it. She examines works by Dorothy Richardson, E.M. Forster, Henry Handel Richardson, Max Beerbohm and Compton Mackenzie, among others, contending that Edwardian fiction with music as a subject undermined the prevalent antithesis, expressed in contemporary music literature, between a nineteenth-century conception of music as a means of transcendence and the increasing mechanisation of music as represented by the player piano. Her timely survey of the player piano in the context of Edwardian commercial and technical discourse draws on a rich array of archival materials to shed new light on the historically conditioned activity of music-making in early twentieth-century fiction.
Categories: Literary Criticism

When Machines Play Chopin

When Machines Play Chopin

Author: Katherine Maree Hirt

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:265038028

Category: German prose literature

Page: 197

View: 977

Categories: German prose literature

Kulturelle Wirkungen der Reformation Cultural Impact of the Reformation

Kulturelle Wirkungen der Reformation   Cultural Impact of the Reformation

Katherine Maree Hirt, When Machines Play Chopin. Musical Spirit and Automation in Nineteenth-Century German Literature, Berlin/New York, NY 2010, 127. Cf. James Grier, The Critical Editing of Music, Cambridge 1996, 199; Piero Rattalino, ...

Author: Klaus Fitschen

Publisher: Evangelische Verlagsanstalt

ISBN: 9783374056781

Category: Religion

Page: 640

View: 267

Die Reformation veränderte nicht nur Theologie und Kirche, sondern setzte einen alle Bereiche der Gesellschaft erfassenden Transformationsprozess in Gang. So beeinflusste der Protestantismus nachhaltig soziale Strukturen, kulturelle Wahrnehmungsmuster, Rechtsnormen, Wissenschaftsideale, künstlerische Ausdrucksmittel und Identitätsbildungen. Die beiden gewichtigen Bände dokumentieren den internationalen und interdisziplinären Kongress "Kulturelle Wirkungen der Reformation", der im August 2017 von den Universitäten Halle-Wittenberg, Jena und Leipzig an der Stiftung LEUCOREA in Lutherstadt Wittenberg durchgeführt wurde. Dessen Beiträge – u. a. von Udo Sträter, Charlotte Methuen, Martin Heckel, Herman Selderhuis, Rudolf von Sinner, Daniel Jeyaraj und Jochen Hörisch – machen deutlich, wie die protestantischen Konfessionsmilieus seit 500 Jahren kulturell wirksam sind, aber auch, wie sie ihrerseits auf gesellschaftliche Herausforderungen reagieren. The Reformation not only changed theology and the church, but set in motion a fundamental transformation, which encompassed every aspect of society. Thus, Protestantism had an enduring influence on social structures, patterns of perception, normative ideas, scientific concepts, scopes for artistic expression and cultural identities. The announced proceedings document the international and interdisciplinary congress "Cultural Impacts of the Reformation" held in August 2017 by the universities of Halle-Wittenberg, Jena and Leipzig at the LEUCOREA Foundation in Lutherstadt Wittenberg. The contributions – amongst others by Udo Sträter, Charlotte Methuen, Martin Heckel, Herman Selderhuis, Rudolf von Sinner, Daniel Jeyaraj und Jochen Hörisch – show precisely both the ways the Protestant confessional milieus have been influential for 500 years and how they themselves have reacted to cultural challenges.
Categories: Religion

Animals Machines and AI

Animals  Machines  and AI

machine-like aspects of the state as forces that threaten to undermine the organism of society. ... 45 Katherine Hirt, When Machines Play Chopin: Musical Spirit and Automation in NineteenthCentury German Literature (Berlin: De Gruyter, ...

Author: Erika Quinn

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110753677

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 237

Sentient animals, machines, and robots abound in German literature and culture, but there has been surprisingly limited scholarship on non-human life forms in German studies. This volume extends interdisciplinary research in emotion studies to examine non-humans and the affective relationships between humans and non-humans in modern German cultural history. In recent years, fascination with emotions, developments in robotics, and the burgeoning of animal studies in and beyond the academy have given rise to questions about the nature of humanity. Using sources from the life sciences, literature, visual art, poetry, philosophy, and photography, this collection interrogates not animal or machine emotions per se, but rather uses animals and machines as lenses through which to investigate human emotions and the affective entanglements between humans and non-humans. The COVID-19 pandemic made us more keenly aware of the importance of both animals and new technologies in our daily lives, and this volume ultimately sheds light on the centrality of non-humans in the human emotional world and the possibilities that relationships with non-humans offer for enriching that world.
Categories: Social Science

Keys to Play

Keys to Play

When Machines Play Chopin: Musical Spirit and Automation in NineteenthCentury German Literature. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2010. Hobbins, Daniel. Authorship and Publicity before Print: Jean Gerson and the Transformation of Late Medieval ...

Author: Roger Moseley

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520291249

Category: Music

Page: 468

View: 164

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program for monographs. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. How do keyboards make music playable? Drawing on theories of media, systems, and cultural techniques, Keys to Play spans Greek myth and contemporary Japanese digital games to chart a genealogy of musical play and its animation via improvisation, performance, and recreation. As a paradigmatic digital interface, the keyboard forms a field of play on which the book’s diverse objects of inquiry—from clavichords to PCs and eighteenth-century musical dice games to the latest rhythm-action titles—enter into analogical relations. Remapping the keyboard’s topography by way of Mozart and Super Mario, who head an expansive cast of historical and virtual actors, Keys to Play invites readers to unlock ludic dimensions of music that are at once old and new.
Categories: Music

Magician of Sound

Magician of Sound

that piano technique could be learned through the systematic use of mechanical equipment. ... Cited in Katherine Hirt, When Machines Play Chopin: Musical Spirit and Automation in Nineteenth-Century German Literature (Berlin: De Gruyter, ...

Author: Jessie Fillerup

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520976962

Category: Music

Page: 302

View: 223

French composer Maurice Ravel was described by critics as a magician, conjurer, and illusionist. Scholars have been aware of this historical curiosity, but none so far have explained why Ravel attracted such critiques or what they might tell us about how to interpret his music. Magician of Sound examines Ravel's music through the lens of illusory experience, considering how timbre, orchestral effects, figure/ground relationships, and impressions of motion and stasis might be experienced as if they were conjuring tricks. Applying concepts from music theory, psychology, philosophy, and the history of magic, Jessie Fillerup develops an approach to musical illusion that newly illuminates Ravel's fascination with machines and creates compelling links between his music and other forms of aesthetic illusion, from painting and poetry to fiction and phantasmagoria. Fillerup analyzes scenes of enchantment and illusory effects in Ravel's most popular works, including Boléro, La Valse, Daphnis et Chloé, and Rapsodie espagnole, relating his methods and musical effects to the practice of theatrical conjurers. Drawing on a rich well of primary sources, Magician of Sound provides a new interdisciplinary framework for interpreting this enigmatic composer, linking magic and music.
Categories: Music

Body and Force in Music

Body and Force in Music

Osiris 28 (1): 232–253. Hiebert, Erwin. 2014. The Helmholtz Legacy in Physiological Acoustics. New York: Springer. Hirt, Katherine. 2010. When Machines Play Chopin: Musical Spirit and Automation in Nineteenth-Century German Literature.

Author: Youn Kim

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000607765

Category: Music

Page: 164

View: 323

Our understanding of music is inherently metaphorical, and metaphoricity pervades all sorts of musical discourses, be they theoretical, analytical, philosophical, pedagogical, or even scientific. The notions of "body" and "force" are the two most pervasive and comprehensive scientific metaphors in musical discourse. Throughout various intertwined contexts in history, the body–force pair manifests multiple layers of ideological frameworks and permits the conceptualization of music in a variety of ways. Youn Kim investigates these concepts of body and force in the emerging field of music psychology in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The field’s discursive space spans diverse contexts, including psychological theories of auditory perception and cognition, pedagogical theories on the performer’s bodily mechanism, speculative and practical theories of musical rhythm, and aesthetical discussion of the power of music. This investigation of body and force aims to illuminate not just the past scene of music psychology but also the notions of music that are being constructed at present.
Categories: Music

Chopin s Prophet

Chopin s Prophet

But how many play five-finger exercises over and over like machines until they have taken their daily allowance of mechanism. Listen to every tone that you play, and above all, listen if you would play Chopin.

Author: Edward Blickstein

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 9780810884977

Category: Music

Page: 480

View: 398

Vladimir de Pachmann was perhaps history’s most notorious pianist. Widely regarded as the greatest player of Chopin’s works, Pachmann embedded comedic elements—be it fiddling with his piano bench or flirting with the audience—within his classic piano recitals to alleviate his own anxiety over performing. But this wunderkind, whose admirers included Franz Liszt and music critic James Gibbons Huneker (who cheekily nicknamed Pachmann the “Chopinzee”), would by the turn of the century find his antics on the concert stage scorned by critics and out of fashion with listeners, burying his pianistic legacy. In Chopin’s Prophet: The Life of Pianist Vladimir de Pachmann, the first biography ever of this remarkable figure, Edward Blickstein and Gregor Benko explore the private and public lives of this master pianist, surveying his achievements within the context of contemporary critical opinion and preserving his legacy as one of the last great Romantic pianists of his time. Chopin’s Prophet paints a colorful portrait of classical piano performance and celebrity at the turn of the 20th century while also documenting Pachmann’s attraction to men, which ultimately ended his marriage but was overlooked by his audiences. As the authors illustrate, Pachmann lived in a radically different world of music making, one in which eccentric personality and behavior fit into a much more flexible, and sometimes mysterious, musical community, one where standards were set not by certified experts with degrees but by the musicians themselves. Detailing the evolution of concert piano playing style from the era of Chopin until World War I, Chopin’s Prophet tells the fantastic and true story of an artist of and after his time.
Categories: Music

The Relentless Pursuit of Tone

The Relentless Pursuit of Tone

When Machines Play Chopin: Musical Spirit and Automation in Nineteenth-Century Literature. New York: De Gruyter, 2010. Jackson, Myles. Harmonious Triads: Physicists, Musicians, and Instrument Makers in NineteenthCentury Germany.

Author: Robert Fink

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199985258

Category: Music

Page: 400

View: 918

The Relentless Pursuit of Tone: Timbre in Popular Music assembles a broad spectrum of contemporary perspectives on how "sound" functions in an equally wide array of popular music. Ranging from the twang of country banjoes and the sheen of hip-hop strings to the crunch of amplified guitars and the thump of subwoofers on the dance floor, this volume bridges the gap between timbre, our name for the purely acoustic characteristics of sound waves, and tone, an emergent musical construct that straddles the borderline between the perceptual and the political. Essays engage with the entire history of popular music as recorded sound, from the 1930s to the present day, under four large categories. "Genre" asks how sonic signatures define musical identities and publics; "Voice" considers the most naturalized musical instrument, the human voice, as racial and gendered signifier, as property or likeness, and as raw material for algorithmic perfection through software; "Instrument" tells stories of the way some iconic pop music machines-guitars, strings, synthesizers-got (or lost) their distinctive sounds; "Production" then puts it all together, asking structural questions about what happens in a recording studio, what is produced (sonic cartoons? rockist authenticity? empty space?) and what it all might mean.
Categories: Music