Why ERA Failed

Why ERA Failed

Looks at the history of previous Constitutional amendments, including income tax, prohibition, women's suffrage, and child labor, and analyzes the factors that stopped the Equal Rights Amendment

Author: Mary Frances Berry

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253204593

Category: Political Science

Page: 166

View: 717

Looks at the history of previous Constitutional amendments, including income tax, prohibition, women's suffrage, and child labor, and analyzes the factors that stopped the Equal Rights Amendment
Categories: Political Science

Constitutional Commentary

Constitutional Commentary

Thomas D. Rowe, Jr. The Tolerant Society: Freedom of Speech and Extremist Speech in America . . . . . . . . . . . . James Magee Why ERA Failed: Politics, Women's Rights, and the Amending Process of the Constitution Rights of Passage: ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B5075856

Category: Constitutional history

Page: 520

View: 760

Categories: Constitutional history

The U S Constitution and the Supreme Court

The U S  Constitution and the Supreme Court

Author: Steven Anzovin

Publisher: Hw Wilson Company

ISBN: UOM:39015013368686

Category: Law

Page: 246

View: 935

A compilation of seventeen previously published articles on the topic of the Constitution and its relationship with the Supreme Court.
Categories: Law

Encyclopedia of Women and American Politics Third Edition

Encyclopedia of Women and American Politics  Third Edition

Why ERA Failed: Politics, Women's Rights and the Amending Process of the Constitution. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986 . Accessed DeWolf, Rebecca. “2021 Could Finally Be the Moment for the Equal Rights Amendment.

Author: Lynne Ford

Publisher: Infobase Holdings, Inc

ISBN: 9781646938216

Category: History

Page: 694

View: 915

Encyclopedia of Women and American Politics, Third Edition contains all the material a reader needs to understand the role of women throughout America's political history. This informative A-to-Z volume contains hundreds of entries covering the people, events, and terms involved in the history of women and politics. Entries include: Abortion Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez The birth control movement Black Lives Matter Hillary Rodham Clinton Deb Haaland Domestic violence Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) Glass ceiling League of Women Voters #MeToo movement Michelle Obama Sonia Sotomayor Elizabeth Warren and many more.
Categories: History

Roe V Wade

Roe V  Wade

On the ERA , see Mary Frances Berry , Why ERA Failed ( 1986 ) , and Jane J. Mansbridge , Why We Lost the ERA ( 1986 ) . As we indicated in the final chapter and the conclusion , we are still in the middle of the story of Roe , and no ...

Author: N. E. H. Hull

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015053488006

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 219

An historical analysis of the abortion debate retraces the key events, legal issues, and social consequences of this contentious issue since the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case. Simultaneous.
Categories: History

Beautiful Losers

Beautiful Losers

In this collection of essays, Washington Times columnist Francis argues that the 1992 victory of the Democratic Party in the presidential campaign marks not only the end of the Reagan-Bush era but the failure of American conservatism.

Author: Samuel Francis

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826209764

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 387

In this collection of essays, Washington Times columnist Francis argues that the 1992 victory of the Democratic Party in the presidential campaign marks not only the end of the Reagan-Bush era but the failure of American conservatism. He asserts that the changes of the last decade have led to a virtual disappearance of the political Right, and that for the first time since the New Deal, the nation faces the prospect of political democracy without an oppositional force to liberalism. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Categories: History

Adjusting to Policy Failure in African Economies

Adjusting to Policy Failure in African Economies

This is paramount given that the preadjustment era of forced institutional change , under the sponsorship of the state , failed so miserably . A second challenge begins with the recognition that formal sector institutions , including ...

Author: Director Cornell Food and Nutrition Policy Program David E Sahn

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105003459455

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 448

View: 635

In this timely volume sixteen specialists examine the external and domestic factors that precipitated Africa's economic crisis and the nature and consequences of the process of reform designed to restore macroeconomic stability and accelerate the rate of economic growth. The authors explore the efforts of ten diverse countries in sub-Saharan Africa to rectify economic distortions of the past and weaknesses in institutional structures. Their case studies include Ghana, Guinea, Zaire, Cameroon, Niger, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Gambia, and Madagascar.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Carter Presidency

The Carter Presidency

Policy Choices in the Post-New Deal Era Gary M. Fink, Hugh Davis Graham, Holland McTyeier Professor of History Hugh Davis ... Mary Frances Berry , Why ERA Failed : Politics , Women's Rights , and the Amending Process of the Constitution ...

Author: Gary M. Fink

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015040349907

Category: Political Science

Page: 310

View: 250

After the Nixon and Ford administrations, liberal Democrats hoped Jimmy Carter's election in 1976 would restore the New Deal agenda in the White House. Instead, during four tumultuous years in office, Carter endorsed many of the fiscal and economic policies later espoused by his Republican successor, Ronald Reagan. But Carter also backed most New Deal social programs and, however reluctantly, pursued a traditional containment foreign policy. In this book more than a dozen eminent scholars provide a balanced overview of key elements of Carter's presidency, examining the significance of his administration within the context of evolving American policy choices after World War II. They seek not only to understand the troubled Carter presidency but also to identify the changes that precipitated and accompanied the demise of the New Deal order. By the time Carter took office many Americans had become disenchanted with big government and welfare spending, and his presidency is viewed in these pages as a transitional administration. As this volume demonstrates, Carter's dilemma emerged from his effort to steer a course between traditional expectations of federal government and new political and economic realities. While most of the contributors agree that his administration may be justly criticized for failing to find that course, they generally conclude that Carter was more successful than his critics acknowledge. These thirteen original essays cover such topics as the economy, trade and industrial policies, welfare reform, energy, environment, civil rights, feminism, and foreign policy. They offer thoughtful assessments of Carter's performance, focusing on policy both as cause and effect of the post-industrial transformation of American society that shadowed his administration. A final essay shows how Carter's public spirited post-presidential career has made him one of America's greatest ex-presidents. Grounded on research conducted at the Carter Library, The Carter Presidency is an incisive reassessment of an isolated Democratic administration from the vantage point of twenty years. It is a milestone in the historical appraisal of that administration, inviting us to take a new look at Jimmy Carter and see what his presidency represented for a dramatically changing America.
Categories: Political Science

The Equal Rights Amendment

The Equal Rights Amendment

In 1923, she wrote the Equal Rights Amendment. It was introduced in Congress. And the national debate over the ERA began. The major principle of the Equal Rights Amendment is that gender should not determine any legal rights of citizens.

Author: LeeAnne Gelletly

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781422293447

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 728

It took decades, and a Constitutional amendment, for all American women to get the right to vote. But the legal right to vote did not guarantee equality under the law. Suffrage leader Alice Paul believed another amendment was needed. In 1923, she wrote the Equal Rights Amendment. It was introduced in Congress. And the national debate over the ERA began. The major principle of the Equal Rights Amendment is that gender should not determine any legal rights of citizens. Supporters believed the ERA would keep women from being denied equal rights under federal, state, or local law. The ERA had many opponents in the 1920s. And it had even more in the 1970s, after Congress passed the measure. Although it failed to pass by its 1982 ratification deadline, some people believe the ERA is still alive. They are continuing the effort to put equality for women in the U.S. Constitution.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

The National Organization for Women and the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment

The National Organization for Women and the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment

Part II: The ERA ................................................................................................................... 6 3.1. The history behind the ERA. ... Why ERA failed.

Author: Jacqueline Herrmann

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783638027496

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 17

View: 163

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject American Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1-, University of Frankfurt (Main) (Zentrum für Nordamerikaforschung), course: U.S. History and Society: the 1950s and 1960s, language: English, abstract: In the following essay I will try to examine the role and importance of the National Organization for Women in the Women’s Liberation Movement as well as their long-running fight for the Equal Rights Amendment. Terms such as Great Society, Civil Rights Movement, Women’s Liberation, Youth Counterculture, New Left, Rock ́n ́ Roll, Woodstock, the landing on the moon, etc. characterize the turbulent Sixties. The Sixties are often described as the “decade of discontent” but also as the “decade of peace, love and harmony”. A major aspect of the 1960s was the revival of the feminist movement. In 1966 the National Organization for Women was founded, which grew to the largest organization of feminist activist in the United States and had a big influence on the development of the status of women. In the following essay I will try to examine the role and importance of the National Organization for Women in the Women’s Liberation Movement as well as their long-running fight for the Equal Rights Amendment. In Part I, I will deal with the National Organization for Women in general. I will take a look at the history of the organization and at their goals and actions. Their long-winded fight for the so-called Equal Rights Amendment will be examined in Part II. I will try to explore the history behind the ERA and then primarily focus on the ratification process in the second half of the twentieth century. In the conclusion I will finally try to summarize the most important results. The new feminist movement of the 1960s was split into two types of feminist groups: a formal and an informal branch. The formal branch included the National Organization for Women (NOW), the Women’s Equity Action League (WEAL) as well as the National Women’s Political Caucus (NWPC) whereas the informal branch included so called consciousness-raising groups. The latter tried to attack sexism and discrimination in everyday life. The formal branch worked for changes in legislation and tried to enforce equal rights laws, “[...] such as the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 banning sex discrimination, and Title IX of the Higher Education Acts of 1969 and 1972, which prohibited sex discrimination in such matters as school sports programs.” (Giele: 1995, S. 169) The National Organization for Woman (NOW) was founded on June 30, 1966 in Washington, D.C. by reformers such as union activists, members of state commissions on the status of women or professional women.
Categories: Literary Collections