Wild Bill Wellman

Wild Bill Wellman

Here is a portrait of a profoundly American spirit and visionary, a man’s man who was able to put into cinematic storytelling the most subtle and fulsome of feeling, a man feared, respected, and loved.

Author: William Wellman, Jr.

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 9781101870280

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 656

View: 539

The extraordinary life—the first—of the legendary, undercelebrated Hollywood director known in his day as “Wild Bill” (and he was!) Wellman, whose eighty-two movies (six of them uncredited), many of them iconic; many of them sharp, cold, brutal; others poetic, moving; all of them a lesson in close-up art, ranged from adventure and gangster pictures to comedies, aviation, romances, westerns, and searing social dramas. Among his iconic pictures: the pioneering World War I epic Wings (winner of the first Academy Award for best picture), Public Enemy (the toughest gangster picture of them all), Nothing Sacred, the original A Star Is Born, Beggars of Life, The Call of the Wild, The Ox-Bow Incident, Battleground, The High and the Mighty... David O. Selznick called him “one of the motion pictures’ greatest craftsmen.” Robert Redford described him as “feisty, independent, self-taught, and self-made. He stood his ground and fought his battles for artistic integrity, never wavering, always clear in his film sense.” Wellman directed Hollywood’s biggest stars for three decades, including Clark Gable, Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyck, John Wayne, Lauren Bacall, and Clint Eastwood. It was said he directed “like a general trying to break out of a beachhead.” He made pictures with such noted producers as Darryl F. Zanuck, Nunnally Johnson, Jesse Lasky, and David O. Selznick. Here is a revealing, boisterous portrait of the handsome, tough-talking, hard-drinking, uncompromising maverick (he called himself a “crazy bastard”)—juvenile delinquent; professional ice-hockey player as a kid; World War I flying ace at twenty-one in the Lafayette Flying Corps (the Lafayette Escadrille), crashing more than six planes (“We only had four instruments, none of which worked. And no parachutes . . . Greatest goddamn acrobatics you ever saw in your life”)—whose own life story was more adventurous and more unpredictable than anything in the movies. Wellman was a wing-walking stunt pilot in barnstorming air shows, recipient of the Croix de Guerre with two Gold Palm Leaves and five United States citations; a bad actor but good studio messenger at Goldwyn Pictures who worked his way up from assistant cutter; married to five women, among them Marjorie Crawford, aviatrix and polo player; silent picture star Helene Chadwick; and Dorothy Coonan, Busby Berkeley dancer, actress, and mother of his seven children. Irene Mayer Selznick, daughter of Louis B. Mayer, called Wellman “a terror, a shoot-up-the-town fellow, trying to be a great big masculine I-don’t-know-what. David had a real weakness for him. I didn’t share it.” Yet she believed enough in Wellman’s vision and cowritten script about Hollywood to persuade her husband to produce A Star Is Born, which Wellman directed. After he took over directing Tarzan Escapes at MGM, Wellman went to Louis B. Mayer and asked to make another Tarzan picture on his own. “What are you talking about? It’s beneath your dignity,” said Mayer. “To hell with that,” said Wellman, “I haven’t got any dignity.” Now William Wellman, Jr., drawing on his father’s unpublished letters, diaries, and unfinished memoir, gives us the first full portrait of the man—boy, flyer, husband, father, director, artist. Here is a portrait of a profoundly American spirit and visionary, a man’s man who was able to put into cinematic storytelling the most subtle and fulsome of feeling, a man feared, respected, and loved.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Man and His Wings

The Man and His Wings

In this first-ever biography, the director's son, William Wellman Jr., reveals the war hero, family man, occasional prankster, and underestimated visionary who changed Hollywood forever.".

Author: William A. Wellman

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0275985415

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 184

View: 212

Its director, who went on to direct the likes of John Wayne, James Cagney, and Gary Cooper, later earned an Oscar for writing one of Hollywood's most loved (and often remade) films, A Star is Born. In this first-ever biography, the director's son, William Wellman Jr., reveals the war hero, family man, occasional prankster, and underestimated visionary who changed Hollywood forever.".
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

A Life of Barbara Stanwyck

A Life of Barbara Stanwyck

Now, Victoria Wilson gives us the most complete portrait of this magnificent actress, seen as the quintessential Brooklyn girl whose family was in fact of old New England stock…her years in New York as dancer and Broadway star…her ...

Author: Victoria Wilson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439194065

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1056

View: 658

Frank Capra called her, "The greatest emotional actress the screen has yet known." Yet she was one of its most natural, timeless, and underrated stars. Now Victoria Wilson, gives us the most complete portrait we have yet had, or will have, of this magnificent actresses, seen as the quintessential Brooklyn girl whose family was in fact of old New England stock…her years in New York as dancer and Broadway star…her fraught marriage to Frank Fay, Broadway genius, who influenced a generation of actors and comedians (among them, Jack Benny and Stanwyck herself)…the adoption of a son, embattled from the outset; her partnership with the "unfunny" Marx brother, Zeppo, together creating one of the finest horse breeding farms in the west; her fairytale romance and marriage to the younger Robert Taylor, America's most sought-after male star…Here is the shaping of her career working with many of Hollywood's most important directors: among them, Capra, King Vidor, Cecil B. Demille, Preston Sturges, all set against the times-the Depression, the rise of the unions, the coming of World War II and a fast-evolving coming-of-age motion picture industry. At the heart of the book, Stanwyck herself-her strengths, her fears, her desires-how she made use of the darkness in her soul, keeping it at bay in her private life, transforming herself from shunned outsider into one of Hollywood's-and America's-most revered screen actresses. Written with full access to Stanwyck's family, friends, colleagues, and never-before-seen letters, journals and photographs.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

LIFE

LIFE

"Wild. Bill". Wellman. brings. the. lunatic. touch. to. directing. The Nothing Sacred
set, while that movie was being made, was ... The picture was directed by William
Augustus ("Wild Bill") Wellman, who believes that the way to get a cast into the ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 96

View: 683

LIFE Magazine is the treasured photographic magazine that chronicled the 20th Century. It now lives on at LIFE.com, the largest, most amazing collection of professional photography on the internet. Users can browse, search and view photos of today’s people and events. They have free access to share, print and post images for personal use.
Categories:

Wild Bill Hickok Gunfighter

Wild Bill Hickok  Gunfighter

Jane Wellman was called to testify on behalf of the Territory, and although
Munroe [sic] McCanles was subpoenaed to attend, he was not called upon to
give evidence. None of the witnesses' testimony was recorded; but by the time
Hickok, ...

Author: Joseph G. Rosa

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806150239

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 216

View: 402

“James Butler Hickok, generally called ‘Wild Bill,’ epitomized the archetypal gunfighter, that half-man, half-myth that became the heir to the mystique of the duelist when that method of resolving differences waned. . . . Easy access to a gun and whiskey coupled with gambling was the cause of most gunfights--few of which bore any resemblance to the gentlemanly duel of earlier times. . . . Hickok’s gunfights were unusual in that most of them were ‘fair’ fights, not just killings resulting from rage, jealousy over a woman, or drunkenness. And, the majority of his encounters were in his role as lawman or as an individual upholding the law.”--from Wild Bill Hickok, Gunfighter Wild Bill Hickok (1837–1876) was a Civil War spy and scout, Indian fighter, gambler, and peace officer. He was also one of the greatest gunfighters in the West. His peers referred to his reflexes as “phenomenal” and to his skill with a pistol as “miraculous.” In Wild Bill Hickok, Gunfighter, Joseph G. Rosa, the world’s foremost authority on Hickok, provides an informative examination of Hickok’s many gunfights. Rosa describes the types of guns used by Hickok and illustrates his use of the plains’ style of “quick draw,” as well as examining other elements of the Hickok legend. He even reconsiders the infamous “dead man’s hand” allegedly held by Hickok when he was shot to death at age thirty-nine while playing poker. Numerous photographs and drawings accompany Rosa’s down-to-earth text.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Robert Mitchum

Robert Mitchum

In May RKO delivered Mitchum to John Wayne's Batjac Company at Warner Bros.
, where he was to take the lead in Track of the Cat under the direction of that old
star maker Wild Bill Wellman. The cast, in addition to Mitch, included Teresa ...

Author: Lee Server

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1429908734

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 608

View: 797

One of the movies' greatest actors and most colorful characters, a real-life tough guy with the prison record to prove it, Robert Mitchum was a movie icon for an almost unprecedented half-century, the cool, sleepy-eyed star of such classics as The Night of the Hunter; Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison; Cape Fear; The Longest Day; Farewell, My Lovely; and The Winds of War. Mitchum's powerful presence and simmering violence combined with hard-boiled humor and existential detachment to create a new style in movie acting: the screen's first hipster antihero-before Brando, James Dean, Elvis, or Eastwood-the inventor of big-screen cool. Robert Mitchum: "Baby, I Don't Care" is the first complete biography of Mitchum, and a book as big, colorful, and controversial as the star himself. Exhaustively researched, it makes use of thousands of rare documents from around the world and nearly two hundred in-depth interviews with Mitchum's family, friends, and associates (many going on record for the first time ever) ranging over his seventy-nine years of hard living. Written with great style, and vividly detailed, this is an intimate, comprehensive portrait of an amazing life, comic, tragic, daring, and outrageous.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Barbara Stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck

same years she was laying the groundwork for her career with Frank Capra,
Stanwyck made several films with another director, William “Wild BillWellman,
an adventurous teller of tall tales so rip-snortingly vigorous and “manly” that in ...

Author: Dan Callahan

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781617031847

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 656

Barbara Stanwyck (1907-1990) rose from the ranks of chorus girl to become one of Hollywood’s most talented leading women-and America’s highest paid woman in the mid-1940s. Shuttled among foster homes as a child, she took a number of low-wage jobs while she determinedly made the connections that landed her in successful Broadway productions. Stanwyck then acted in a stream of high-quality films from the 1930s through the 1950s. Directors such as Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang, and Frank Capra treasured her particular magic. A four-time Academy Award nominee, winner of three Emmys and a Golden Globe, she was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Academy. Dan Callahan considers both Stanwyck’s life and her art, exploring her seminal collaborations with Capra in such great films as Ladies of Leisure, The Miracle Woman, and The Bitter Tea of General Yen; her Pre-Code movies Night Nurse and Baby Face; and her classic roles in Stella Dallas, Remember the Night, The Lady Eve, and Double Indemnity. After making more than eighty films in Hollywood, she revived her career by turning to television, where her role in the 1960s series The Big Valley renewed her immense popularity. Callahan examines Stanwyck’s career in relation to the directors she worked with and the genres she worked in, leading up to her late-career triumphs in two films directed by Douglas Sirk, All I Desire and There’s Always Tomorrow, and two outrageous westerns, The Furies and Forty Guns. The book positions Stanwyck where she belongs-at the very top of her profession-and offers a close, sympathetic reading of her performances in all their range and complexity.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Wild Bill Hickok

Wild Bill Hickok

The company hired a man named Horace Wellman to manage the station .
Hickok was hired by the firm or by Wellman himself to do odd jobs in the station's
stables and stockyards . By the time James Hickok arrived at Rock Creek ,
however ...

Author: Joseph G. Rosa

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 0823966321

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 941

Traces the life and exploits of William Hickok, the legendary Western sharpshooter and U.S. marshal known as "Wild Bill."
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Wild Bill Hickock

Wild Bill Hickock

These two walked toward the barn in which the horses were kept, while David
McCanles and his son walked toward the house, in which were Wild Bill, Mr. and
Mrs. Wellman, and Sarah Kelsey, a servant. According to Monroe McCanles,
while ...

Author: Frank Jenners Wilstach

Publisher:

ISBN: UCR:31210006170425

Category: Peace officers

Page: 304

View: 553

Categories: Peace officers

Clark Gable

Clark Gable

He was on his way to meet with director “ Wild BillWellman and a large
contingent of cast and crew at the Mt. Baker Lodge in Heather Meadows to do
location shooting for the movie of Jack London's Call of the Wild . When the train
pulled ...

Author: Chrystopher J. Spicer

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786411244

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 360

View: 236

"Clark Gable is a man de-classed. You can't guess in any way where he came from or what he was." Frank Taylor, producer of Gable's last film, The Misfits (1961), said this of the man who, to many people, will forever be Southern gentleman Rhett Butler of Gone with the Wind. This work tells Gable's life story, from his birth in 1901 in Cadiz, Ohio, to his death in 1960 in Hollywood. It chronicles his stage career, and of course gives information on every one of his films. His family background, his development as a person, the many romances including five marriages, and his relationships with friends and co-workers are all explored in detail. The sources used and the bibliography are fully annotated.
Categories: Performing Arts

Hollywood Gold Films of the Forties and Fifties

Hollywood Gold  Films of the Forties and Fifties

True this “Capra comedy without Capra” may not seem to be Wild Bill Wellman's
cup of tea, but he handles it well. The trouble is that the screenplay fails to
develop its good central idea fully and gets itself side-tracked into providing a
stellar ...

Author: John Howard Reid

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781411635241

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 258

View: 901

Hollywood's Golden Era? I'd pick the period from 1939 through 1960. Here are 144 classic movies from this Golden Age of the Cinema, ranging (alphabetically) from "The Admiral Was a Lady" to "You Were Never Lovelier". Other films discussed in comprehensive detail (and with full background and release information) in this book include "The Adventures of Mark Twain", "The Chase", "Daisy Kenyon", "The Ghost of Frankenstein", "Humoresque", "In Old California", "Joan of Paris", "Letter from an Unknown Woman", "Magic Town", "Nightmare Alley", The Paradine Case", "Roughly Speaking", "The Scarlet Claw", "Where the Sidewalk Ends" and "You'll Never Get Rich".
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

God Bless You Buffalo Bill

God Bless You  Buffalo Bill

The film had a rather curious origin , being one of two movies ( the other was the
1942 Thunderbirds ) that William A . “ Wild BillWellman had agreed to direct for
Zanuck “ sight unseen ” for the privilege of making The Ox - Bow Incident ( 1943 )
 ...

Author: Wayne Michael Sarf

Publisher: Sterling/Main Street

ISBN: UOM:39015003983551

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 279

View: 204

This survey shows how the Old West differed from the movie West and how Hollywood distorted the era through careless anachronisms, myth-making and the glamorization of Western figures. Sarf presents minibiographies of Jesse James, Calamity Jane, Wyatt Earp, Belle Starr and others, contrasts them with the many glossy Hollywood versions of their lives and is critical of films such as Little Big Man and Butch Cassidy. Each chapter ends with a number of gossipy notes and includes a long annotated bibliography. ISBN 0-8386-3089-8 : $27.50.
Categories: Performing Arts

Dreams and Dead Ends

Dreams and Dead Ends

Leroy comes across as a caustic moralist (“Wild Bill”), Wellman's less stolid
sensibility can be discerned in his treatment of three representative scenes: 1.
Prohibition eve. People are seen frantically stocking up on liquor. Some are
drunk ...

Author: Jack Shadoian

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198032633

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 400

View: 610

Dreams and Dead Ends provides a compelling history of the twentieth-century American gangster film. Beginning with Little Caesar (1930) and ending with Things To Do In Denver When You're Dead (1995), Jack Shadoian adroitly analyzes twenty notable examples of the crime film genre. Moving chronologically through nearly seven decades, this volume offers illuminating readings of a select group of the classic films--including The Public Enemy, D.O.A., Bonnie and Clyde, and The Godfather--that best define and represent each period in the development of the American crime film. Richly illustrated with more than seventy film stills, Dreams and Dead Ends details the evolution of the genre through insightful and precise considerations of cinematography, characterization, and narrative style. This updated edition includes new readings of three additional movies--Once Upon a Time in America, Things To Do In Denver When You're Dead, and Criss Cross--and brings this clear and lively discussion of the history of the gangster film to the end of the twentieth century.
Categories: Performing Arts

Motion Picture

Motion Picture

No one knew better than Tab the tremendous significance and privilege of
working with "Wild Bill" Wellman. For months, Hollywood's young actors held their
breath hoping that Wellman would choose one ol them for the leading man in ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015011023044

Category: Motion pictures

Page:

View: 253

Categories: Motion pictures

Tommy Gun

Tommy Gun

One of the most realistic World War II movies released during the war was
William "Wild Bill" Wellman's The Story of GI Joe (1945). The concept was a film
based on the relationship that had been formed between regular GIs on the
Italian front ...

Author: Bill Yenne

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429964876

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 688

The Trench Broom. The Annihilator. The Persuader. The Chopper. The Chicago Typewriter. The Tommy Gun. The Thompson submachine gun has gone by many names, and for nearly a century the gun's image has been indelibly marked on the popular consciousness. In this broad-reaching cultural and military history, Bill Yenne charts the tommy gun's unpredictable and one-of-a-kind career, from its infamy in the hands of Al Capone and the Chicago mobsters, to its shady days with the IRA, to its indelible place in the arsenal of World War II, and its truly immortal and ongoing role in Hollywood. The tommy gun is without a doubt the most famous, and the most infamous, American firearm of the twentieth century. Since its birth in the aftermath of World War I, the tommy gun has enjoyed a varied career on both sides of the law. Though General John T. Thompson invented it for the American military, it first found notoriety thanks to its part in events such at St. Valentine's Day Massacre. But when the United States entered World War II, the gun's true power as an essential, life-saving weapon made it an iconic weapon of the American GI. Full of incredible stories from the battlefields of Europe and the Pacific, America's gangland, and Hollywood studio back lots, Bill Yenne's Tommy Gun is the definitive story of this unique American icon.
Categories: History

Charles Walters

Charles Walters

This feminizing moniker was conjured by Metro's publicity wizards, and it was a
distant cry from the past promotion of William “Wild BillWellman, Victor Fleming,
or W. S. “Woody” Van Dyke, whose hard drinking and profligate womanizing had
 ...

Author: Brent Phillips

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813147222

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 368

View: 665

From the trolley scene in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers's last dance on the silver screen ( The Barkleys of Broadway, 1949) to Judy Garland's timeless, tuxedo-clad performance of "Get Happy" ( Summer Stock, 1950), Charles Walters staged the iconic musical sequences of Hollywood's golden age. During his career, this Academy Award--nominated director and choreographer showcased the talents of stars such as Gene Kelly, Doris Day, Debbie Reynolds, and Frank Sinatra. However, despite his many critical and commercial triumphs, Walters's name often goes unrecognized today. In the first full-length biography of Walters, Brent Phillips chronicles the artist's career, from his days as a featured Broadway performer and protégé of theater legend Robert Alton to his successes at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. He takes readers behind the scenes of many of the studio's most beloved musicals, including Easter Parade (1948), Lili (1953), High Society (1956), and T he Unsinkable Molly Brown (1964). In addition, Phillips recounts Walters's associations with Lucille Ball, Joan Crawford, and Gloria Swanson, examines the director's uncredited work on several films, including the blockbuster Gigi (1958), and discusses his contributions to musical theater and American popular culture. This revealing book also considers Walters's personal life and explores how he navigated the industry as an openly gay man. Drawing on unpublished oral histories, correspondence, and new interviews, this biography offers an entertaining and important new look at an exciting era in Hollywood history.
Categories: Performing Arts

Combat Films

Combat Films

When “Wild BillWellman directed Battlegroundin 1949, the veteran MGM art
department—the same team that had built the Munchkin village of The Wizard
ofOz and Tara for Gone with the Wind—built the Ardennes Forest of Bastogne on
a ...

Author: Steven Jay Rubin

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786486137

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 312

View: 744

This critical text offers a behind-the-scenes look at fifteen of the most important American war films of the last 60 years. Based on original interviews and archival research and featuring rare photographs, this book covers films considered unusually realistic for the genre. The original edition (1981) covered war films through World War II, while the present, expanded edition includes seven new chapters covering the Civil War, the American gunboat presence in China in the 1920s, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the fighting in Mogadishu in 1993 and the war in Iraq.
Categories: Performing Arts

Film and Stereotype

Film and Stereotype

This outlines the precise pattern that essentially dominates all classical Westerns
dealing with Buffalo Bill and that is then carried through the structure of
Wellman's film. After the conflicts in the West and a twist of fate that undeservedly
leads to ...

Author: Jörg Schweinitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231525213

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 396

View: 460

Since the early days of film, critics and theorists have contested the value of formula, cliché, conventional imagery, and recurring narrative patterns of reduced complexity in cinema. Whether it's the high-noon showdown or the last-minute rescue, a lonely woman standing in the window or two lovers saying goodbye in the rain, many films rely on scenes of stereotype, and audiences have come to expect them. Outlining a comprehensive theory of film stereotype, a device as functionally important as it is problematic to a film's narrative, Jörg Schweinitz constructs a fascinating though overlooked critical history from the 1920s to today. Drawing on theories of stereotype in linguistics, literary analysis, art history, and psychology, Schweinitz identifies the major facets of film stereotype and articulates the positions of theorists in response to the challenges posed by stereotype. He reviews the writing of Susan Sontag, Roland Barthes, Theodor W. Adorno, Rudolf Arnheim, Robert Musil, Béla Balázs, Hugo Münsterberg, and Edgar Morin, and he revives the work of less-prominent writers, such as René Fülöp-Miller and Gilbert Cohen-Séat, tracing the evolution of the discourse into a postmodern celebration of the device. Through detailed readings of specific films, Schweinitz also maps the development of models for adapting and reflecting stereotype, from early irony (Alexander Granowski) and conscious rejection (Robert Rossellini) to critical deconstruction (Robert Altman in the 1970s) and celebratory transfiguration (Sergio Leone and the Coen brothers). Altogether a provocative spectacle, Schweinitz's history reveals the role of film stereotype in shaping processes of communication and recognition, as well as its function in growing media competence in audiences beyond cinema.
Categories: Performing Arts

Foreign Service

Foreign Service

Cheers that echoed even above the Here ' s " Wild Bill " Wellman ( left ) as he
unceasing German heavy artillery onappeared in 1918 in France with the
slaughts resounded again and again " Black Cat " Corps of the Lafayette
Escadrille and as ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89058355686

Category: Veterans

Page:

View: 751

Categories: Veterans

Films in Review

Films in Review

Like Howard Hawks , Wellman dealt thematically with camaraderie between
professionals in the face of danger , and filled his films with violence , action , and
humor . Hawks and Wellman have many similarities , but " Wild Bill ” had a lusty ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105010165053

Category: Electronic journals

Page:

View: 673

Categories: Electronic journals