World War II German Super Heavy Siege Guns

World War II German Super Heavy Siege Guns

In total, the German Army used some 50 siege guns during World War II, far more than the thirty-five it had during World War I. Supported by contemporary photographs and detailed artwork of the guns and their components, this is an ...

Author: Marc Romanych

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472837189

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 320

As the outbreak of World War II approached, Nazi Germany ordered artillery manufacturers Krupp and Rheimetall-Borsig to build several super-heavy siege guns, vital to smash through French and Belgian fortresses that stood in the way of the Blitzkrieg. These 'secret weapons' were much larger than the siege artillery of World War I and included the largest artillery piece of the war, the massive 80cm railway gun 'schwere Gustav' (Heavy Gustav). However, these complex and massive artillery pieces required years to build and test and, as war drew near, the German High Command hastily brought several WWI-era heavy artillery pieces back into service and then purchased, and later confiscated, a large number of Czech Skoda mortars. The new super siege guns began entering service in time for the invasion of Russia, notably participating in the attack on the fortress of Brest-Litovsk. The highpoint for the siege artillery was the siege of Sevastopol in the summer of 1942, which saw the largest concentration of siege guns in the war. Afterwards, when Germany was on the defensive in the second half of 1943, the utility of the guns was greatly diminished, and they were employed in a piecemeal and sporadic fashion on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. In total, the German Army used some 50 siege guns during World War II, far more than the thirty-five it had during World War I. Supported by contemporary photographs and detailed artwork of the guns and their components, this is an essential guide to these guns, exploring their history, development, and deployment in stunning detail.
Categories: History

World War II German Super Heavy Siege Guns

World War II German Super Heavy Siege Guns

WORLD. WAR. II. GERMAN. SUPER-HEAVY. SIEGE. GUNS. Germany manufactured several super-heavy siege guns for the specific purpose of destroying modern reinforced concrete fortifications such as France's Maginot Line.

Author: Marc Romanych

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472837165

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 164

As the outbreak of World War II approached, Nazi Germany ordered artillery manufacturers Krupp and Rheimetall-Borsig to build several super-heavy siege guns, vital to smash through French and Belgian fortresses that stood in the way of the Blitzkrieg. These 'secret weapons' were much larger than the siege artillery of World War I and included the largest artillery piece of the war, the massive 80cm railway gun 'schwere Gustav' (Heavy Gustav). However, these complex and massive artillery pieces required years to build and test and, as war drew near, the German High Command hastily brought several WWI-era heavy artillery pieces back into service and then purchased, and later confiscated, a large number of Czech Skoda mortars. The new super siege guns began entering service in time for the invasion of Russia, notably participating in the attack on the fortress of Brest-Litovsk. The highpoint for the siege artillery was the siege of Sevastopol in the summer of 1942, which saw the largest concentration of siege guns in the war. Afterwards, when Germany was on the defensive in the second half of 1943, the utility of the guns was greatly diminished, and they were employed in a piecemeal and sporadic fashion on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. In total, the German Army used some 50 siege guns during World War II, far more than the thirty-five it had during World War I. Supported by contemporary photographs and detailed artwork of the guns and their components, this is an essential guide to these guns, exploring their history, development, and deployment in stunning detail.
Categories: History

Super heavy Tanks of World War II

Super heavy Tanks of World War II

The super-heavy tanks of World War II are heirs to the siege machine tradition – a means of breaking the deadlock of ground combat.

Author: Kenneth W Estes

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781782003847

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 513

The super-heavy tanks of World War II are heirs to the siege machine tradition – a means of breaking the deadlock of ground combat. As a class of fighting vehicle, they began with the World War I concept of the search for a 'breakthrough' tank, designed to cross enemy lines. It is not surprising that the breakthrough tank projects of the period prior to World War II took place in the armies that suffered the most casualties of the Great War (Russia, France, Germany). All of the principal Axis and Allied nations eventually initiated super-heavy development projects, with increasingly heavy armor and armament. Much as the casualties of World War I prompted the original breakthrough tank developments, as Germany found itself on the defensive, with diminishing operational prospects and an increasingly desperate leadership, so too did its focus turn to the super-heavy tanks that could turn the tide back in their favor.
Categories: History

The Wehrmacht

The Wehrmacht

The German Army of World War II, 1939-1945 Tim Ripley. German Siege Warfare During late spring ... To facilitate the siege and subsequent attack , the Germans allocated their largest - caliber super - heavy artillery around the port .

Author: Tim Ripley

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1579583121

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 447

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: History

The US Army in World War II 3

The US Army in World War II  3

Super-heavy artillery The 'siege gun' version of the 8in gun weighed 35 tons; used by both the US Navy and Army, it fired shells weighing over 200lbs (90.7kg) to ranges of up to 35,000 yards (32km, 19.8 miles).

Author: Mark Henry

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781780969893

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 125

The GIs who struggled ashore through the surf of Omaha and Utah Beaches on 6 June 1944 were members of the best-equipped army ever assembled up to that date. It was in the NW Europe campaign of June 1944-May 1945 that the US Army was finally able to show its full potential for fluent mechanised warfare. This title describes both combat and service uniforms worn in the ETO, from the assault troops on the D-Day beaches to bemedalled veterans celebrating VE-Day; other subjects covered include artillery, tanks, anti-tank weapons, the engineers, the replacement system; and the insignia of the divisions committed to this front. Men-at-Arms 342, 347 and 350 are also available as a single volume special edition as 'The US Army in World War II'.
Categories: History

The Modern Weaponry of the World s Armed Forces

The Modern Weaponry of the World   s Armed Forces

be moved field referred field about army gun to on the is smaller an the battlefield artillery march guns and piece. in that response when could ... Even the German superheavy guns in World War II were rail or caterpillar-track mobile.

Author: Col. Y Udaya Chandar (Retd.)

Publisher: Notion Press

ISBN: 9781946983794

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 554

View: 199

The Modern Weaponry of the World’s Armed Forces is a treatise of military weaponry. It depicts about fortypresent-day weapon systems possessed by various nations, describingthreeto fourweapons of each category with images, specifications, origin, development and design briefly. The weapon systems presented are almost all fromthe twenty-firstcentury orthe weapons presently under development. Only a very few officers in the three services know the finer distinctions between, say, cruise missile and ballistic missile, fourthgeneration jet fighter and fifthgeneration jet fighter and howitzer and a field gun. All such nuances are explained clearly. The beginning explains the ‘history of military weapons’ briefly and ends with information on the missile shield erected by most countries including India. The missile shield destroys the hostile incoming aircraft or missile automatically. The missile shield presented is real,existson the ground today and not fictitious. The militaries win thewar with the help of the man who stands erect in the face of the enemy fire and the weapon that is in his hands. All the students of military science must read this invaluable book about the gun in the hands of asoldier, what exactly it is and how much it matters.
Categories: Antiques & Collectibles

Superguns 1854 1991

Superguns 1854   1991

The pinnacle of World War I guns was the so-called “Paris Gun,” the longest-range cannon to see combat in the war, and arguably the first of the “superguns.” The development of heavy, long-range artillery in Germany was dominated by the ...

Author: Steven J. Zaloga

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472826114

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 332

Over the last 150 years, gun designers have sought to transform warfare with artillery of superlative range and power, from William Armstrong's 19th-century “monster guns” to the latest research into hypersonic electro-magnetic railguns. Taking a case study approach, Superguns explains the technology and role of the finest monster weapons of each era. It looks at the 1918 “Wilhelm Gun,” designed to shell Paris from behind the German trenches; the World War II “V-3” gun built to bombard London across the Channel; the Cold War atomic cannons of the US and Soviet Union; and the story of Dr Gerald Bull's HARP program and the Iraqi “Supergun” he designed for Saddam Hussein. Illustrated throughout, this is an authoritative history of the greatest and most ambitious artillery pieces of all time.
Categories: History

World War I Battlefield Artillery Tactics

World War I Battlefield Artillery Tactics

Siege artillery Germany faced the certainty of confronting well-designed modern fortifications in any future European war, and studied the lessons of the 1904 ... These included the value of both very heavy and very light siege weapons.

Author: Dale Clarke

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781782005919

Category: History

Page: 64

View: 327

As the First World War bogged down across Europe resulting in the establishment of trench systems, artillery began to grow in military importance. Never before had the use of artillery been so vital, and to this day the ferocity, duration and widespread use of artillery across the trenches of Europe has never been replicated. Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork, this groundbreaking study explains and illustrates the enormous advances in the use of artillery that took place between 1914 and 1918, the central part artillery played in World War I and how it was used throughout the war, with particular emphasis on the Western Front.
Categories: History

Infantry Aces

Infantry Aces

Maneuver warfare was the product of World War Two; it has been employed ever since. ... type of rocket launcher) and heavy howitzers or siege guns (such as the German Thorwith a caliber of 600 mm). In the German Army the commander of ...

Author: Franz Kurowski

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 9780811732024

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 100

Combat stories of eight German infantry soldiers: one paratrooper, two members of the Waffen-SS, and five members of the Wehrmacht A concluding chapter examines infantry tactics This is an authentic account of German infantry aces, common foot soldiers who were thrust into a blazing maelstrom of bloody horror the world had never seen. On the frozen Russian steppes, under the scorching African desert sun, and in the final desperate battles, they were outnumbered and outgunned and faced impossible odds. Here are the fascinating stories of the men who stared death in the face during some of the most brutal battles ever waged.
Categories: History

Ten Days in August

Ten Days in August

German. Artillery. Takes. Liège. The. Liège. Myth. Any history of the Battle of Liège attributes the fall of the fortress ... solely by superheavy artillery; the German21cm mortarsare notmentioned.2 John Keegan's The First World War, ...

Author: Terence Zuber

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 9780750957618

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 998

In August 1914 the German main attack was conducted by the 2nd Army. It had the missions of taking the vital fortresses of Liège and Namur, and then defeating the Anglo- French-Belgian forces in the open plains of northern Belgium. The German attack on the Belgian fortress at Liège from 5 to 16 August 1914 had tremendous political and military importance, and yet there has never been a complete account of the siege. The German and Belgian sources are fragmentary and biased. The short descriptions in English are general, use a few Belgian sources and are filled with inaccuracies. Making use of both German and Belgian sources, and supported by tactical maps, this book for the first time describes and evaluates the construction of the fortress, its military purpose, the German plan and the conduct of the attack. Previous accounts emphasise the importance of the huge German ‘Big Bertha’ cannon, to the virtual exclusion of everything else; Ten Days in August shows that the effect of this gun was a myth, and reveals how the Germans really took the fortress and thus set the scene for perhaps the most destructive conflict in history.
Categories: History