Writing History in the Soviet Union

Writing History in the Soviet Union

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Introduction: Inherited Traditions of Historical Scholarship -- 1.

Author: Arup Banerji

Publisher:

ISBN: 1138503940

Category: Historiography

Page: 342

View: 417

Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Preface -- Introduction: Inherited Traditions of Historical Scholarship -- 1. The Histories of History in the Soviet Union -- 2. The Impact of Glasnost' on the Writing of History -- 3. Histories of the Communist Party as Histories of the Soviet Union -- 4. Depictions and Revisions: The Russian Revolution in History -- 5. The Historical Archive -- 6. History in Russian Schools -- A Select Bibliography -- Index
Categories: Historiography

Writing History in the Soviet Union

Writing History in the Soviet Union

6 Alter L. Litvin, Writing History in Twentieth Century Russia: A View from Within, translated and edited by John L.H. Keep, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, 2001, 7, citing a Soviet study on The sources of Soviet historical science ...

Author: Arup Banerji

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351381987

Category: Social Science

Page: 322

View: 553

The history of the Soviet Union has been charted in several studies over the decades. These depictions while combining accuracy, elegance, readability and imaginativeness, have failed to draw attention to the political and academic environment within which these histories were composed. Writing History in the Soviet Union: Making the Past Work is aimed at understanding this environment. The book seeks to identify the significant hallmarks of the production of Soviet history by Soviet as well as Western historians. It traces how the Russian Revolution of 1917 triggered a shift in official policy towards historians and the publication of history textbooks for schools. In 1985, the Soviet past was again summoned for polemical revision as part and parcel of an attitude of openness (glasnost') and in this, literary figures joined their energies to those of historians. The Communist regime sought to equate the history of the country with that of the Communist Party itself in 1938 and 1962 and this imposed a blanket of conformity on history writing in the Soviet Union. The book also surveys the rich abundance of writing the Russian Revolution generated as well as the divergent approaches to the history of the period. The conditions for research in Soviet archives are described as an aspect of official monitoring of history writing. Another instance of this is the manner by which history textbooks have, through the years, been withdrawn from schools and others officially nursed into circulation. This intervention, occasioned in the present circumstance by statements by President Putin himself, in the manner in which history is taught in Russian schools, continues to this day. In other words, over the years, the regime has always worked to make the past work. Please note: Taylor & Francis does not sell or distribute the Hardback in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh & Sri Lanka
Categories: Social Science

The Writing of History in the Soviet Union

The Writing of History in the Soviet Union

Stalin's political omnipotence carried with it an academic dictum that made objective historical research impossible, as Stalin wrote history himself or censored works written by others. One would seriously err to assume that Stalinism ...

Author: Anatole G. Mazour

Publisher: Stanford, Calif. : Hoover Institution Press

ISBN: UOM:39015004755057

Category: Russia

Page: 383

View: 175

Categories: Russia

Dissident Histories in the Soviet Union

Dissident Histories in the Soviet Union

This is important reading for all scholars working on late Soviet history and society."--Bloomsbury Publishing.

Author: Barbara Martin

Publisher:

ISBN: 1350106828

Category: Dissenters

Page: 293

View: 446

"How was it possible to write history in the Soviet Union, under strict state control and without access to archives? What methods of research did these 'historians' - be they academic, that is based at formal institutions, or independent - rely on? And how was their work influenced by their complex and shifting relationships with the state? To answer these questions, Barbara Martin here tracks the careers of four bold and important dissidents: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Roy Medvedev, Aleksandr Nekrich and Anton Antonov-Ovseenko. Based on extensive archival research and interviews (with some of the authors themselves, as well as those close to them), the result is a nuanced and very necessary history of Soviet dissident history writing, from the relative liberalisation of de-Stalinisation through increasing repression and persecution in the Brezhnev era to liberalisation once more during perestroika. In the process Martin sheds light onto late Soviet society and its relationship with the state, as well as the ways in which this dissidence participated in weakening the Soviet regime during Perestroika. This is important reading for all scholars working on late Soviet history and society."--Bloomsbury Publishing.
Categories: Dissenters

Politics and History in the Soviet Union

Politics and History in the Soviet Union

This book presents a detailed analysis of Soviet historiography of the Communist Party in the USSR after Khrushchev's secret speech denouncing Stalin through the Twenty-third Party Congress (roughly 1956-1966).

Author: Nancy Whittier Heer

Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press

ISBN: 0262080451

Category: Russia

Page: 319

View: 820

Historiography in the mid-twentieth century USSR was charged to an unprecedented degree with the functions of legitimizing political institutions, perpetuating established mores and mythology, and rationalizing official policies. The specific claims of Marxist-Leninist doctrine placed the Soviet historian -- required to serve as scholar, high priest, and political functionary, often caught between the conflicting pressures of ideological orthodoxy and liberalization -- under special tensions. This book presents a detailed analysis of Soviet historiography of the Communist Party in the USSR after Khrushchev's secret speech denouncing Stalin through the Twenty-third Party Congress (roughly 1956-1966). The author uses source materials that she spent a number of years reading and translating -- Soviet mass-edition texts and pamphlets, scholarly monographs, articles in historical journals and the popular press -- to construct a schematic chronology of developments in political history and related political events under Khrushchev and his immediate successors.
Categories: Russia

Writing the Stalin Era

Writing the Stalin Era

Covering topics such as the Soviet monopoly over information and communication, violence in the gulags, and gender relations after World War II, this festschrift volume highlights the work and legacy of Sheila Fitzpatrick offers a cross ...

Author: G. Alexopoulos

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 0230109306

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 466

Covering topics such as the Soviet monopoly over information and communication, violence in the gulags, and gender relations after World War II, this festschrift volume highlights the work and legacy of Sheila Fitzpatrick offers a cross-section of some of the best work being done on a critical period of Russia and the Soviet Union.
Categories: History

The Soviet Union Since 1917

The Soviet Union Since 1917

Author: Martin McCauley

Publisher: London ; New York : Longman

ISBN: 0582489792

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 298

Categories: History

The Oxford History of Historical Writing

The Oxford History of Historical Writing

5 George Enteen, The Soviet Scholar-Bureaucrat: M. N. Pokrovskii and the Society of Marxist Historians (University Park, 1978), 190; and Anatole Mazour, The Writing of History in the Soviet Union (Stanford, 1971), 13–21.

Author: Axel Schneider

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191036774

Category: History

Page: 744

View: 396

The fifth volume of The Oxford History of Historical Writing offers essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally since 1945. Divided into two parts, part one selects and surveys theoretical and interdisciplinary approaches to history, and part two examines select national and regional historiographies throughout the world. It aims at once to provide an authoritative survey of the field and to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is chronologically the last of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past across the globe from the beginning of writing to the present day.
Categories: History

Dissident Histories in the Soviet Union

Dissident Histories in the Soviet Union

10 Marshall S. Shatz, Soviet Dissent in Historical Perspective (Cambridge; London: Cambridge University Press, 1980), ... 1956), 65; Arup Banerji, Writing History in the Soviet Union: Making the Past Work (Berghahn Books, 2008), 146.

Author: Barbara Martin

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350106819

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 213

How was it possible to write history in the Soviet Union, under strict state control and without access to archives? What methods of research did these 'historians' - be they academic, that is based at formal institutions, or independent - rely on? And how was their work influenced by their complex and shifting relationships with the state? To answer these questions, Barbara Martin here tracks the careers of four bold and important dissidents: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Roy Medvedev, Aleksandr Nekrich and Anton Antonov-Ovseenko. Based on extensive archival research and interviews (with some of the authors themselves, as well as those close to them), the result is a nuanced and very necessary history of Soviet dissident history writing, from the relative liberalisation of de-Stalinisation through increasing repression and persecution in the Brezhnev era to liberalisation once more during perestroika. In the process Martin sheds light onto late Soviet society and its relationship with the state, as well as the ways in which this dissidence participated in weakening the Soviet regime during Perestroika. This is important reading for all scholars working on late Soviet history and society.
Categories: History

Writing History in Film

Writing History in Film

the Soviet Union as its leaders would have it seen and in the second to the Soviet Union as dissent envisages it. For Ferro, then, it is not the past that is “at the controls” of historical representation in film; it is the present.

Author: William Guynn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135204211

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 236

View: 627

Historical film has been an important genre since the earliest silent films. The French Revolution, the American Civil War, the conquest of the New World, World War II--all have been repeatedly represented in film. But how do we distinguish between fictionalized spectacle and authentic historical representation? Writing History in Film sets out the narratological, semiological, rhetorical, and philosophical bases for understanding how film can function as a form of historical interpretation and representation. With case studies and an interdisciplinary approach, William Guynn examines the key issues facing film students and scholars, historians, and anyone interested in how we see our historical past.
Categories: Performing Arts

Historical Archives and the Historians Commission to Investigate the Armenian Events of 1915

Historical Archives and the Historians  Commission to Investigate the Armenian Events of 1915

Ziva Galili, “Archives and Historical Writing,” in Blouin, Jr. and Rosenberg, Archives, Documentation and Institutions of Social Memory, p. 443; Arup Banerji, Writing History in the Soviet Union: Making the Past Work (New Delhi: Social ...

Author: Yücel Güçlü

Publisher: UPA

ISBN: 9780761865674

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 670

This book demonstrates the vital importance of Ottoman and other relevant archives in Turkey for the study of the Armenian question. By turning a modern eye on historical events, Güçlü gives necessary attention to discovering the precise chronology, meaning, and development of the continuing negotiations between Turkey and Armenia.
Categories: History

Jewish Women Writers in the Soviet Union

Jewish Women Writers in the Soviet Union

The struggle between Trotsky and Stalin for leadership of the Soviet Union ended in Trotsky's defeat in 1924. ... In preparation of the text above, also the following resources were used: Shikman, Leaders in National History; Torchinov, ...

Author: Rina Lapidus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136645471

Category: LITERARY CRITICISM

Page: 212

View: 651

This book presents the lives and works of eleven Jewish women authors who lived in the Soviet Union, and who wrote and published their works in Russian. The works include poems, novels, memoirs and other writing. The book provides an overview of the life of each author, an overview of each author’s literary output, and an assessment of each author’s often conflicted view of her "feminine self" and of her "Jewish self". At a time when the large Jewish population which lived within the Soviet Union was threatened under Stalin’s prosecutions the book provides highly-informative insights into what it was like to be a Jewish woman in the Soviet Union in this period. The writers presented are: Alexandra Brustein, Elizaveta Polonskaia, Raisa Bloch, Hanna Levina, Ol'ga Ziv, Yulia Neiman, Rahil’ Baumwohl’, Margarita Alliger, Sarah Levina-Kul’neva, Sarah Pogreb and Zinaida Mirkina.
Categories: LITERARY CRITICISM

Der Nister s Soviet Years

Der Nister s Soviet Years

This volume reveals how profoundly Der Nister was affected by the destruction of Jewish life during WWII and his own personal misfortunes.

Author: Mikhail Krutikov

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253041906

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 987

A critical look at the later work of the Russian Jewish author in the Soviet Union and its significance to Russian and Jewish history. In Der Nister’s Soviet Years, author Mikhail Krutikov focuses on the second half of the dramatic writing career of Soviet Yiddish writer Der Nister, pen name of Pinhas Kahanovich (1884–1950). Krutikov follows Der Nister’s painful but ultimately successful literary transformation from his symbolist roots to social realism under severe ideological pressure from Soviet critics and authorities. This volume reveals how profoundly Der Nister was affected by the destruction of Jewish life during WWII and his own personal misfortunes. While Der Nister was writing a history of his generation, he was arrested for anti-government activities and died tragically from a botched surgery in the Gulag. Krutikov illustrates why Der Nister’s work is so important to understandings of Soviet literature, the Russian Revolution, and the catastrophic demise of the Jewish community under Stalin. “Krutikov’s book on Der Nister will serve an important function, offering a strong, well-researched, and well-organized analysis of six significant periods in Der Nister’s writing. I expect it to inspire a great many new readers of Der Nister, inside and outside of academia.” —Amelia M. Glaser, author of Jews and Ukrainians in Russia’s Literary Borderlands: From the Shtetl Fair to the Petersburg Bookshop “Among Soviet Yiddish writers, Der Nister occupies a unique place in literary history. Mikhail Krutikov’s meticulous analysis follows the transformation of the writer under the pressure of the Soviet ideological environment.” —Gennady Estraikh, author of Yiddish in the Cold War
Categories: Literary Criticism

Protest Reform and Repression in Khrushchev s Soviet Union

Protest  Reform and Repression in Khrushchev s Soviet Union

3 (September 1968), 814-26 Gilligan, E. Defending Human Rights in Russia: Sergei Kovalyov, Dissident and Human Rights ... 'Writing History and the End of the Soviet Era: The Secret Lives of Natan Eidel'man', Kriti/ea: Explorations in ...

Author: Robert Hornsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107311336

Category: History

Page:

View: 180

Protest, Reform and Repression in Khrushchev's Soviet Union explores the nature of political protest in the USSR during the decade following the death of Stalin. Using sources drawn from the archives of the Soviet Procurator's office, the Communist Party, the Komsomol and elsewhere, Hornsby examines the emergence of underground groups, mass riots and public attacks on authority as well as the ways in which the Soviet regime under Khrushchev viewed and responded to these challenges, including deeper KGB penetration of society and the use of labour camps and psychiatric repression. He sheds important new light on the progress and implications of de-Stalinization, the relationship between citizens and authority and the emergence of an increasingly materialistic social order inside the USSR. This is a fascinating study which significantly revises our understanding of the nature of Soviet power following the abandonment of mass terror.
Categories: History

Contested Memory

Contested Memory

The first official history of the Great Patriotic War appeared in the Soviet Union in 1960-1965.

Author: Yan Mann

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:966672412

Category: Electronic dissertations

Page: 428

View: 960

The first official history of the Great Patriotic War appeared in the Soviet Union in 1960-1965. It evolved into a six-volume set that elicited both praise and criticism from the reading public. This dissertation examines the creation of the historiographical narrative of the Great Patriotic War in the decade following de-Stalinization in 1956. The debates historians, Party and state representatives engaged in, including the responses they received from reviewers and readers, shed new light on the relationship between the government, those who wrote state-sponsored narratives, and the reading public. The narrative examined here shows the importance and value placed on the war effort, and explores how aspects of the Stalinist period were retained during the Thaw. By focusing on previously unexplored archival material, which documents debates and editorial decisions, an examination of how officials sought to control the states explanation of events, motivations and consequences of the war can be examined in-depth. To date, the periodization, terminology and areas of concentration that define the course of the Great Patriotic War are fixated on topics that Stalins war narrative favored, assigning significance to events according to Stalinist preferences rather than objective analysis. My study of the war's historiography shows how contentious its memory became at every level, making it difficult to clearly discern who represented and opposed the party line throughout Soviet society. The author argues that the collective memory of the war, as propagated by the state, became so all-encompassing that it was often the preferred version, infiltrating individual memories and displacing or blending with personal recollections and factual documentation. Because the war touched the entire population of the Soviet Union, its story became the foundational myth of the USSR, replacing the October Revolution, and was used as a legitimizing tool by Nikita Khrushchev and Leonid Brezhnev. Most recently, it has experienced a revival in the post-Soviet period by Vladimir Putin as a way to unify Russia and build popular support for his administration. Viewing how the public interacted with representatives of the state over the creation of the official history of the war suggests that like no other event, war compels any state, even a totalitarian state, to reexamine its foundations, historical memory, foreign and domestic policies and views on censorship.
Categories: Electronic dissertations

History for the IB Diploma The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 1924 2000

History for the IB Diploma  The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 1924 2000

The new president took a much more hardline approach to the Soviet Union. Soviet—US tensions increased even further a month later, ... What are the other two main areas in which bias might be a potentialproblem when writing history?

Author: Allan Todd

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107693449

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 240

View: 766

An exciting series that covers selected topics from the Higher Level options in the IB History syllabus. This coursebook covers Higher Level option 5, Topic 9, The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 1924-2000. The text is divided into clear sections following the IB syllabus structure and content specifications. It offers a sound historical account along with detailed explanations and analysis, and an emphasis on historical debate to prepare students for the in-depth, extended essay required in the Paper 3 examination. It also provides plenty of exam practice including student answers with examiner's comments, simplified mark schemes and practical advice on approaching the Paper 3 examination.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Red Legacies in China

Red Legacies in China

For the politics of writing history in the Soviet Union, see Karen Petrone, Life Has Become More Joyous, Comrades: Celebrations in the Time of Stalin (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2000). On the Ten Great Buildings, ...

Author: Jie Li

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9781684171170

Category: History

Page:

View: 461

What has contemporary China inherited from its revolutionary past? How do the realities and memories, aesthetics and practices of the Mao era still reverberate in the post-Mao cultural landscape? The essays in this volume propose “red legacies” as a new critical framework from which to examine the profusion of cultural productions and afterlives of the communist revolution in order to understand China’s continuities and transformations from socialism to postsocialism. Organized into five parts—red foundations, red icons, red classics, red bodies, and red shadows—the book’s interdisciplinary contributions focus on visual and performing arts, literature and film, language and thought, architecture, museums, and memorials. Mediating at once unfulfilled ideals and unmourned ghosts across generations, red cultural legacies suggest both inheritance and debt, and can be mobilized to support as well as to critique the status quo.
Categories: History

Everything was Forever Until it was No More

Everything was Forever  Until it was No More

Drawing on diaries, correspondence, interviews and memoirs, and applying historical, anthropological and linguistic analyses, this text explores late Soviet period (1960s-80s) through the eyes of the last Soviet generation.

Author: Alexei Yurchak

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691121178

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 742

Drawing on diaries, correspondence, interviews and memoirs, and applying historical, anthropological and linguistic analyses, this text explores late Soviet period (1960s-80s) through the eyes of the last Soviet generation.
Categories: History

The Dream that Failed

The Dream that Failed

In The Dream that Failed, Laqueur offers an authoritative assessment of the Soviet era--from the triumph of Lenin to the fall of Gorbachev.

Author: Walter Laqueur

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190282899

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 669

Walter Laqueur as been hailed as "one of our most distinguished scholars of modern European history" in the New York Times Book Review. Robert Byrnes, writing in the Journal of Modern History, called him "one of the most remarkable men in the Western world working in the field." Over a span of three decades, in books ranging from Russia and Germany to the recent Black Hundred, he has won a reputation as a major writer and a provocative thinker. Now he turns his attention to the greatest enigma of our time: the rise and fall of the Soviet Union. In The Dream that Failed, Laqueur offers an authoritative assessment of the Soviet era--from the triumph of Lenin to the fall of Gorbachev. In the last three years, decades of conventional wisdom about the U.S.S.R. have been swept away, while a flood of evidence from Russian archives demands new thinking about old assumptions. Laqueur rises to the challenge with a critical inquiry conducted on a grand scale. He shows why the Bolsheviks won the struggle for power in 1917; how they captured the commitment of a young generation of Russians; why the idealism faded as Soviet power grew; how the system ultimately collapsed; and why Western experts have been so wrong about the Communist state. Always thoughtful and incisive, Laqueur reflects on the early enthusiasm of foreign observers and Bolshevik revolutionaries--then takes a piercing look at the totalitarian nature of the Soviet Union. We see how Communist society stagnated during the 1960s and '70s, as the economy wobbled to the brink; we also see how Western observers, from academic experts to CIA analysts, made wildly optimistic estimates of Moscow's economic and political strength. Just weeks before the U.S.S.R. disappeared from the earth, scholars were confidently predicting the survival of the Soviet Union. But in underscoring the rot and repression, he also notes that the Communist state did not necessarily have to fall when it did, and he examines the many factors behind the collapse (the pressure from Reagan's Star Wars arms program, for instance, and ethnic nationalism). Some of these same problems, he finds, continue to shape the future of Russia and the other successor states. Only now, in the rubble of this lost empire, are we coming to grips with just how wrong our assumptions about the U.S.S.R. had been. In The Dream That Failed, an internationally renowned historian provides a new understanding of the Soviet experience, from the rise of Communism to its sudden fall. The result of years of research and reflection, it sheds fresh light on a central episode in our turbulent century.
Categories: History