You Can Paint Vibrant Watercolors in Twelve Easy Lessons

You Can Paint Vibrant Watercolors in Twelve Easy Lessons

From learning how to mix colors on a palette to adding highlights and shadows to produce depth, Nagayama offers all the essential techniques, along with numerous helpful tips and tricks, that make this guide an ideal reference for painters ...

Author: Yuko Nagayama

Publisher: Harper Design

ISBN: 0062336320

Category: Art

Page: 104

View: 747

Create Beautiful Watercolor Paintings in Twelve Easy Lessons You Can Paint Vibrant Watercolors in Twelve Easy Lessons by leading Japanese watercolorist Yuko Nagayama reveals the artist's unique and highly successful process for creating beautiful paintings. Complete with step-by-step illustrations and detailed instructions, Nagayama's approach makes learning the medium simple and fun for beginning painters—and serves as an invaluable resource for more experienced painters as well as those who are looking to refresh their skills. From learning how to mix colors on a palette to adding highlights and shadows to produce depth, Nagayama offers all the essential techniques, along with numerous helpful tips and tricks, that make this guide an ideal reference for painters of all levels.
Categories: Art

American Artist

American Artist

Selfanalysis and drawing language are also discussed to help you develop a vibrant drawing style . ... A skillfully programmed series of twelve lessons conducted by an experienced teacher of drawing , watercolor , and oil . You'll find ...

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ISBN: UOM:39015007246187

Category: Art

Page: 1536

View: 462

Categories: Art

New York Magazine

New York Magazine

But just what does this woman have to fret about, you wonder. After all, she is a remarkable presence onscreen, a combination of girlishness and radiant sensuality, with eyes simultaneously vibrant and eerily deep.

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Page: 112

View: 511

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.
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Indianapolis Monthly

Indianapolis Monthly

Among them: Caroline Mecklin, known for bold figurative paintings (see above); Stutz Artists Association president Wendell Lowe, ... You know that a world-class money manager can make the difference between a good life and a great one.

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Page: 216

View: 663

Indianapolis Monthly is the Circle City’s essential chronicle and guide, an indispensable authority on what’s new and what’s news. Through coverage of politics, crime, dining, style, business, sports, and arts and entertainment, each issue offers compelling narrative stories and lively, urbane coverage of Indy’s cultural landscape.
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An Uncommon Mission

An Uncommon Mission

This book depicts Tupa's work as unique in that his goal was not to promote California or to recreate the missions, rather, he was intent on his own artistic interpretation that combined a physical and spiritual element.

Author: Holly Rarick Witchey

Publisher: Welcome Books

ISBN: UOM:39015050283939

Category: Art

Page: 104

View: 541

The bandw photographs of the 21 California missions depicted here contrast the bright and vibrant color representations that Tupa, a Benedictine monk and priest who now teaches at St. John's University, Minnesota, painted in oil and watercolor during the summer of 1997. Witchey, the manager of New Media Initiatives at the San Diego Museum of Arts, provides the text to this book, describing the history of each mission and analyzing Tupa's art. This book depicts Tupa's work as unique in that his goal was not to promote California or to recreate the missions, rather, he was intent on his own artistic interpretation that combined a physical and spiritual element. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Categories: Art

Barcelona the Great Enchantress

Barcelona  the Great Enchantress

Since publication of that book in 1992, Barcelona has become one of the most vibrant and popular cities in Europe; Hughes describes the pre- and post-Olympics reconstruction that sparked the tremendous revival.Hughes begins the book with ...

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: National Geographic Society

ISBN: UOM:39015059240534

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 406

Robert Hughes has been going to Barcelona regularly since the 1960s and was married in its Gothic city hall last year. Although in his new book Hughes is compelling and engaging in describing Barcelona's remarkable culture and history, his first subject is his 40-year love affair with the city. Thus it is a much more personal book than his earlier Barcelona. Since publication of that book in 1992, Barcelona has become one of the most vibrant and popular cities in Europe; Hughes describes the pre- and post-Olympics reconstruction that sparked the tremendous revival.Hughes begins the book with the decision to marry in Barcelona, "Where to get hitched? It ought not to be in Manhattan, where I lived. Neither Doris nor I is a particularly social animal. Neither of us wanted a fearsomely expensive wedding, and in my post-divorce financial blues almost anything from a New York caterer beyond a sausage on a stick and a can of beer seemed extravagant.But there was a solution. It was Barcelona. Doris didn't have strong feelings about Barcelona-not yet-but I most emphatically did. I had been going there at intervals, to work and to disport myself, for more than 30 years. I had written a biography of the city, some ten years before: not a travel guide nor really a formal history, but something like an attempt to evoke the genius loci of this great queen city of Catalunya-and to tell the story of its development through its formidably rich deposit of buildings and artworks." Hughes goes on to describe the wedding, "Not only in Barcelona, but in the Town Halland by Joan, in his capacity as alcalde [mayor]. And not only by him and in the adjutament, but in its most splendid and history-laden ceremonial room, the Salo de Cent," and the party that followed in an ancient farmhouse. "I thought about a lot of things during that party, though with increasing muzziness as the evening lengthened. Mainly about Doris, about happiness, and about the very circuitous route which had led both of us to Barcelona. When I first spent a mildly riotous and sentimental evening at Xavier's [farmhouse], it was easier to imagine being dead than being over 60, and I had no more idea of Barcelona than I did of Atlantis. But if my grasp of Barcelona 40 years ago was lame and slight, so was that of most Europeans and Americans. Not just slight-embarrassingly so. The 1500 years of the city's existence had produced only five names that came readily to mind. There was Gaudi, of course, and the century's greatest cellist, Pablo Casals. There were the painters Salvador Dali, Joan Miro, and Pablo Picasso." Thus begins Hughes's lively and engrossing account of the history, the art, and especially the architecture of "La gran encisera," the name Catalonia's great 19th-century poet, Maragall, gave to his native city-"the great enchantress." He tells how at the end of the 14th century-when Madrid was hardly more than a cluster of huts-Barcelona commanded a trading empire as wide as the Mediterranean. Barcelona was always what a recent mayor called "the north of the south," the part of Spain closest in contact with Europe, technologically advanced, proactive in trade, passionately democratic. Its wealth made it one of the great Gothic cities, filled with architectural treasures of the 13th-15th centuries. Its language, Catalan, was the medium of an enormously vital literature. Crushed and colonized by the Bourbons in Madrid in the 19th century, Barcelona nevertheless entered a period of prodigious industrial and architectural growth (rebuilt by, among others, the genius Gaudi). Repressed by Franco, who hated the Catalans, it has blossomed anew since 1975 and especially in the last decade.At the end of the book Hughes and his wife return to Barcelona for a one-person exhibit of her watercolors. "Once again I was off to my favorite city in Europe, or the world. For the twentieth time? The thirtieth? Long ago, I lost count. You are lucky if not too late in life, you discover a second city other than your place of birth which becomes a true home townSome forty years ago I had that marvelous stroke of luck: Barcelona."
Categories: History