Zooarchaeology and Field Ecology

Zooarchaeology and Field Ecology

This book is the only field guide and laboratory manual to combine animal ecology and natural history with the detailed osteology of all the vertebrate classes (fishes, amphibians, birds, and mammals) and all the primary orders native to ...

Author: Jack M. Broughton

Publisher:

ISBN: 1607814854

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 201

View: 831

"The only field guide and laboratory manual to cover both the osteology and the natural history of western North American vertebrates in a single volume This photographic atlas, developed over twenty years of teaching in the field, expedites the work of the zooarchaeologist by integrating both osteology and wildlife ecology into a single volume. Zooarchaeology, the study of animal remains found at archaeological sites, is interdisciplinary in nature, requiring students and researchers to not only master the technical skills of identifying fragmentary bones and teeth but also to develop a deep understanding of the taxonomy, natural history, behavior, and ecology of the species identified. Until now, these topics have always been treated separately. This book is the only field guide and laboratory manual to combine animal ecology and natural history with the detailed osteology of all the vertebrate classes (fishes, amphibians, birds, and mammals) and all the primary orders native to western North America. Skeletal images are shown at a variety of magnifications and views and are accompanied by photographs of the animals in their characteristic habitats"--
Categories: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Ethnozoology

Ethnozoology

We find that ecological research in zooarcheology fits well within ethnobiology, which focuses on human–biota interactions in different cultural contexts, be those spatially or ... Zooarchaeology and Field Ecology: A Photographic Atlas.

Author: Romulo Romeu Nobrega Alves

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780128099148

Category: Science

Page: 552

View: 322

Ethnozoology: Animals In Our Lives represents the first book about this discipline, providing a discussion on key themes on human-animal interactions and their implications, along with recent major advances in research. Humans share the world with a bewildering variety of other animals, and have interacted with them in different ways. This variety of interactions (both past and present) is investigated through ethnozoology, which is a hybrid discipline structured with elements from both the natural and social sciences, as it seeks to understand how humans have perceived and interacted with faunal resources throughout history. In a broader context, ethnozoology, and its companion discipline, ethnobotany, form part of the larger body of the science of ethnobiology. In recent years, the importance of ethnozoological/ethnobiological studies has increasingly been recognized, unsurprisingly given the strong human influence on biodiversity. From the perspective of ethnozoology, the book addresses all aspects of human connection, animals and health, from its use in traditional medicine, to bioprospecting derivatives of fauna for pharmaceuticals, with expert contributions from leading researchers in the field. Draws on editors’ and contributors’ extensive research, experience and studies covering ethnozoology and ethnobiology Covers all aspects of human-animal interaction through the lens of this emerging discipline, with coverage of both domestic and wild animal topics Presents topics of great interest to a variety of researchers including those in wildlife/conservation (biologists, ecologists, conservationists) and domestic-related disciplines (psychologists, sociologists)
Categories: Science

Theodore E White and the Development of Zooarchaeology in North America

Theodore E  White and the Development of Zooarchaeology in North America

Paleoecology In his historical overview of the previous fifty years of paleontology, Romer (1959:918) emphasized what he took to be his chosen field's highest callings: “We are dealing with the life of the past—with once living ...

Author: R. Lee Lyman

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803290525

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 296

View: 589

"Theodore E. White and the Development of Zooarchaeology in North America illuminates the researcher and his lasting contribution to a field that has largely ignored him in its history. The few brief histories of North American zooarchaeology suggest that Paul W. Parmalee, John E. Guilday, Elizabeth S. Wing, and Stanley J. Olsen laid the foundation of the field. Only occasionally is Theodore White (1905-77) included, yet his research is instrumental for understanding the development of zooarchaeology in North America. R. Lee Lyman works to fill these gaps in the historical record and revisits some of White's analytical innovations from a modern perspective. A comparison of publications shows that not only were White's zooarchaeological articles first in print in archaeological venues but that he was also, at least initially, more prolific than his contemporaries. While the other "founders" of the field were anthropologists, White was a paleontologist by training who studied long-extinct animals and their evolutionary histories. In working with remains of modern mammals, the typical paleontological research questions were off the table simply because the animals under study were too recent. And yet White demonstrated clearly that scholars could infer significant information about human behaviors and cultures. Lyman presents a biography of Theodore White as a scientist and a pioneer in the emerging field of modern anthropological zooarchaeology. "--
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Multispecies Archaeology

Multispecies Archaeology

As nascent science in the 1950s, a large body of research has been produced in the last seven decades that combines aspects of zoology, biology, and ecology with archaeology. This field may still be overlooked as specialist by many ...

Author: Suzanne E. Pilaar Birch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317480648

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 420

Multispecies Archaeology explores the issue of ecological and cultural novelty in the archaeological record from a multispecies perspective. Human exceptionalism and our place in nature have long been topics of academic consideration and archaeology has been synonymous with an axclusively human past, to the detriment of gaining a more nuanced understanding of one that is shared. Encompassing more than just our relationships with animals, the book considers what we can learn about the human past without humans as the focus of the question. The volume digs deep into our understanding of interaction with plants, fungi, microbes, and even the fundamental building blocks of life, DNA. Multispecies Archaeology examines what it means to be human—and non-human—from a variety of perspectives, providing a new lens through which to view the past. Challenging not only the subject or object of archaeology but also broader disciplinary identities, the volume is a landmark in this new and evolving area of scholarly interest.
Categories: Social Science

Maya Zooarchaeology

Maya Zooarchaeology

2, Archaeology of Southern Mesoamerica, edited by G. Willey and R. Wauchope, pp. 180–194. ... “The Early Preclassic Sequence of Ocos-Salinas la Blanca Area, South Coast of Guatemala. ... Ecology and Field Biology.

Author: Kitty F. Emery

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781938770739

Category: History

Page:

View: 249

A comprehensive work, combining traditional zooarchaeological reports and various state-of-the-art summaries of methods and theoretical perspectives. This combination of detailed discussions of basic zooarchaeological data with reviews of important themes in Maya zooarchaeology emphasizes the central issues that guide our research from basic data collection through final comparative interpretation. The chapters emphasize the newest developments in technical methods, the most recent trends in the analysis of "social zooarchaeology," and the broadening perspectives provided by a new geographic range of investigations. The main focus of the volume remains on fostering cooperation among Mesoamerican zooarchaeologists at the levels of both preliminary analysis and final theoretical reconstruction.
Categories: History

A Companion to Forensic Anthropology

A Companion to Forensic Anthropology

Skill sets Fields involved Osteology, anatomy, physical anthropology Zooarchaeology, paleontology, vertebrate zoology ... vertebrate zoology, biometry Archaeology, surveying (optimal search theory) Geography (archaeology, field ecology, ...

Author: Dennis Dirkmaat

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118959794

Category: Social Science

Page: 752

View: 295

A Companion to Forensic Anthropology presents the most comprehensive assessment of the philosophy, goals, and practice of forensic anthropology currently available, with chapters by renowned international scholars and experts. Highlights the latest advances in forensic anthropology research, as well as the most effective practices and techniques used by professional forensic anthropologists in the field Illustrates the development of skeletal biological profiles and offers important new evidence on statistical validation of these analytical methods. Evaluates the goals and methods of forensic archaeology, including the preservation of context at surface-scattered remains, buried bodies and fatal fire scenes, and recovery and identification issues related to large-scale mass disaster scenes and mass grave excavation.
Categories: Social Science

The Archaeology and Historical Ecology of Late Holocene San Miguel Island

The Archaeology and Historical Ecology of Late Holocene San Miguel Island

Brewer, D.J. 1992 Zooarchaeology: Method, Theory, and Goals. ... Butzer, K. W. 1971 Environment and Archaeology: An Ecological Approach to Prehistory. Second edition. Chicago: Aldine-Atherton. ... Journal of Field Archaeology 5:71–77.

Author: Torben C. Rick

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781938770319

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 981

California's northern Channel Islands have one of the longest and best-preserved archaeological records in the Americas, spanning some 13,000 calendar years. When European explorers first travelled to the area, these islands were inhabited by the Chumash, some of the most populous and culturally complex hunter-gatherers known. Chumash society was characterised by hereditary leaders, sophisticated exchange networks and interaction spheres, and diverse maritime economies. Focusing on the archaeology of five sites dated to the last 3,000 years, this book examines the archaeology and historical ecology of San Miguel Island, the westernmost and most isolated of the northern Channel Islands. Detailed faunal, artefact, and other data are woven together in a diachronic analysis that investigates the interplay of social and ecological developments on this unique island. The first to focus solely on San Miguel Island archaeology, this book examines issues ranging from coastal adaptations to emergent cultural complexity to historical ecology and human impacts on ancient environments.
Categories: History

Applied Zooarchaeology

Applied Zooarchaeology

All three fields collectively form historical ecology and can complement one another with important areas of overlap. Moreover, data from each field are often not available for all geographic areas and biological topics, ...

Author: Lisa Nagaoka

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781733376969

Category: Social Science

Page: 130

View: 151

During the last two decades, zooarchaeologists have increasingly focused aspects of their work on conservation biology. Zooarchaeological data represent an empirical record of past human-animal interactions, which provides conservation with a deep temporal perspective. There are many challenges that face the archaeologist as conservation biologist, however, that have little to do with deep time, faunal remains, and zooarchaeological method and theory. In this book we use a series of case studies with which each of the authors has relevant personal experience to explore the types of interdisciplinary challenges that zooarchaeologists face when crossing into the world of environmental management and animal conservation. Never has there been a greater need for multi-vocal perspectives in conservation biology. This book shows zooarchaeologists how to use zooarchaeological perspectives to help meet those needs, while crossing traditional academic disciplinary boundaries.
Categories: Social Science

Zooarchaeology

Zooarchaeology

As a consequence of these developments, zooarchaeology became a recognized field with a greater role in archaeological studies. ... Meighan and his colleagues (1958a, 1958b) published a two-part series proposing a number of ecological ...

Author: Elizabeth J. Reitz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139467742

Category: Social Science

Page: 558

View: 140

This is an introductory text for students interested in identification and analysis of animal remains from archaeological sites. The emphasis is on animals whose remains inform us about the relationship between humans and their natural and social environments, especially site formation processes, subsistence strategies, the processes of domestication, and paleoenvironments. Examining examples from all over the world, from the Pleistocene period up to the present, this volume is organized in a way that is parallel to faunal study, beginning with background information, bias in a faunal assemblage, and basic zooarchaeological methods. This revised edition reflects developments in zooarchaeology during the past decade. It includes sections on enamel ultrastructure and incremental analysis, stable isotyopes and trace elements, ancient genetics and enzymes, environmental reconstruction, people as agents of environmental change, applications of zooarchaeology in animal conservation and heritage management, and a discussion of issues pertaining to the curation of archaeofaunal materials.
Categories: Social Science

Economic Zooarchaeology

Economic Zooarchaeology

Its life history, ecology, and management, 172–185. ... H., Kintigh, K. W., Kruse, M., Morehouse, K. and Schollmeyer, K. (2006) Why ecology needs archaeologists and archaeology needs ecologists. ... Journal of Field Archaeology 28,

Author: Peter Rowley-Conwy

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: 9781785704468

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 962

Economic archaeology is the study of how past peoples exploited animals and plants, using as evidence the remains of those animals and plants. The animal side is usually termed zooarchaeology, the plant side archaeobotany. What distinguishes them from other studies of ancient animals and plants is that their ultimate aim is to find out about human behaviour – the animal and plant remains are a means to this end. The 33 papers present a wide array of topics covering many areas of archaeological interest. Aspects of method and theory, animal bone identification, human palaeopathology, prehistoric animal utilisation in South America, and the study of dog cemeteries are covered. The long-running controversy over the milking of animals and the use of dairy products by humans is discussed as is the ecological impact of hunting by farmers, with studies from Serbia and Syria. For Britain, coverage extends from Mesolithic Star Carr, via the origins of agriculture and the farmers of Lismore Fields, through considerations of the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Outside Britain, papers discuss Neolithic subsistence in Cyprus and Croatia, Iron Age society in Spain, Medieval and post-medieval animal utilisation in northern Russia, and the claimed finding of a modern red deer skeleton in Egypt’s Eastern Desert. In exploring these themes, this volume celebrates the life and work of Tony Legge (zoo)archaeologist and teacher.
Categories: Social Science